How to Ask for the Toilet in Several Foreign Languages

This public lavatory (WC cottage) in Pond Square, London, United Kingdom was photographed by MattHucke on August 26, 2006.
This public lavatory (WC cottage) in Pond Square, London, United Kingdom was photographed by MattHucke on August 26, 2006. | Source

Bathroom or Toilet?

I traveled to England with a friend several years ago. It was her first visit outside the United States. I had been to England a number of times. We had rented a self-catering service flat—a small apartment with cooking facilities and some maid service. We were in the middle of checking in and signing some papers when my friend Joanne needed to use a restroom.

Joanne interrupted the building manager and asked “Where is the bathroom?” The building manager had a look of horror on her face, which caused Joanne to have a look of puzzlement on hers. I found myself serving as an interpreter, translating American English and British English. In the middle of our renting the apartment (flat), my friend had asked where the room in which one took a bath was located.

To clarify what had happened…

In the United Kingdom (UK), there are usually two separate rooms—one room contains the bathtub and sometimes a shower, and a second room contains the toilet. In the United States (US), the bathtub, shower, sink, and toilet are almost always in the same room, although many homes have an additional room with just a sink and toilet in it.

Where is...?

I have traveled to more than 30 countries, island nations, and island dependencies. One phrase I find essential to know when traveling is “Where is the toilet?” or “Where are the ‘facilities’?” or “Where is the ladies room?” or “Where is the restroom?” or "Where is the lavatory?" or—when I want to get the dirt and dust and grime of traveling off me—“Where is the bathroom?”

This bridge, staircase, and public toilet in Kitzbühel, Austria were photographed by Leitzsche on May 6, 2012.
This bridge, staircase, and public toilet in Kitzbühel, Austria were photographed by Leitzsche on May 6, 2012. | Source

How to Ask for the Location of the Toilet

Where is the toilet?

I have compiled a list of ways in which one can ask in several foreign languages for the location of the toilet when traveling. If you have any translations to add to my list, please post them in the Comments section. Thank you.

Arabic

aynal-hamam

British English

Where's the loo?

Catalan

On és el lavabo? *or* On són els serveis?

Chinese

Cèsuo zài nali?

Croatian

Gdje se nalazi WC? (phonetically pronounced "Gdyeh seh NAH-lah-zee VEH-TSEH")

Czech

Kde je zachod? (phonetically pronounced "Gde ye zaakhot")

Danish

Var ar toaaletten? (phonetically pronounced Vahr ay twa-LETT-en)

Dutch

Waar is het toilet? (phonetically pronounced WAHR is hut twah-LET)

Finnish

Missä on vessa? (phonetically pronounced "MEES-sa ohn VEHS-sah")

French

Où sont les toilettes? (phonetically pronounced "OOH sohng lay twa-LEHT")

German

Wo ist die Toilette? (phonetically pronounced "voh ist dee twak-LET-uh")

Greek

(phonetically pronounced "poo EE-ne ee too-ah-LEH-tah")

Hebrew

aynal-hamam

Hungarian

Hol van a mosdó? (phonetically pronounced "hol vån å MOSH-doa")

Italian

Dov'è il bagno? (phonetically pronounced "doh-VEH eel BAH-nyoh")

Indonesian

Dimana Toiletnya? (phonetically pronounced "DEE muh-nuh TOY-leht-nyuh")

Norwegian

Hvor er toalettet? (phonetically pronounced "Vor ær toa-lett-et")

Polish

Gdzie jest toaleta? (phonetically pronounced "g-jeh yest twa-leta")

Portuguese (Brazil)

Onde é o banheiro?
(phonetically pronounced in Rio de Janeiro "OND-je eh o bahn-YAIR-row")

(phonetically pronounced everywhere in Brazil except Rio de Janeiro "OND-de eh o bahn-YAIR-row")

Portuguese (Portugal)

Onde é a casa-de-banho? (phonetically pronounced "OND eh a KAH-sah de BAH-nyoo"

Russian

GDYE too-ah-LYET?

Spanish

Dónde está el baño? (phonetically pronounced "DOHN-deh ehss-TAH ehl BAH-nyoh")

Swedish

Var är toaletten? (phonetically pronounced "Vahr ay twa-LETT-en")

Turkish

Tuvalet nerede? (phonetically pronounced "Too va let ner eh de")

Reader-Submitted Translations

Many thanks to my readers who were kind enough to provide me with additional translations of Where is the toilet? Your assistance is greatly appreciated.

Tamil

Mohan Kumar (Docmo), who was born in Tamil Nadu, India, submitted these Tamil translations. Tamil is the official language of the state of Tamil Nadu.

Toilet Enge ullathu?
or
Podhu kalipperai Enge ullathu?

American English Slang

Linda Bilyeu (Sunshine625) has contributed Where's the can, man? to the list of translations.

Thai

quicksand has provided the following Thai translations.

Horng Naam Yoo Tee Nai?
You add Khrap at the end if you are a male addressing any gender, and Kha at the end if you are a female addressing any gender.

Japanese

Kymberly Fergussen (nifwlseirff) from Leipzig, Germany has provided Japanese phonetic translations.

The simplest translation is Toire wa doko desu ka?

A more polite translation is Otearai wa doko desu ka?
(The 'o' makes 'teari' more polite.)

Canadian English

Miss Mimi has provided Where's the washroom? as what one says in Canadian English.

Scottish English

James (Jimmy the Jock) Paterson has provided four Scottish English versions of this important question.

  • Where's the the bog?
  • Where's the cludgie?
  • Where's the crapper?
  • Where's the pee hoose (house)?

Tagalog

Thelma Alberts submitted two translations in Tagalog, the the Philippine language.

Saan ang inidoro? ... Where is the toilet?
Saan ang kasilyas? ... Where is the restroom?

When you travel, do you carry a card with you that contains "key phrases" in the languages of the countries you will be visiting?

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Comments 105 comments

KDuBarry03 4 years ago

Language is definitely interesting and thank you for sharing the translations. Yes, I think this would serve as a great guide for anyone who doesn't wish to embarrass themselves in another nation LOL. Great job, Daisy!


Alecia Murphy profile image

Alecia Murphy 4 years ago from Wilmington, North Carolina

This is probably the most important question everyone needs to ask in any language. I didn't know that bathroom in the UK literally meant for a bath and the toilet is separate but it makes sense.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Keith (KDuBarry03),

Thanks for reading my article and being the first person to comment in it.

I was so glad I knew the Spanish phrase several years ago. I was in Caracas, Venezuela on Christmas Day, on a tour organized while the cruise ship I was traveling on was in port.

There was only one souvenir shop open, and the proprietors wouldn't let any of their customers use their "facilities." I saw a government building with a door open. I walked in and asked the armed soldier guarding the entrance "Dónde está el baño?"


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Alecia,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.The looks on the faces on the building manager and my friend were priceless! I wish I would have been able to take some photos.


Janine Huldie profile image

Janine Huldie 4 years ago from New York, New York

Wonderful list for anyone who does travel or will travel. You really covered all the bases here Daisy. Have of course voted and shared all over too!!


Sueswan 4 years ago

Hi Daisy,

A very useful hub. Your story about the building manager with the look of horror on her face reminded me of a story my aunt told me. She and my cousins were in Bristol. My cousin Lorie who was a teenager at the time was asked by the desk clerk at the hotel, what time would she like to be knocked up. She was horrified and said to her mom, "Did you hear what he said to me?

Voted up and interesting

Take care


tipsheets profile image

tipsheets 4 years ago from Philippines

Very useful article! Sharing this.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Sue,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. Thanks, too, for including the anecdote about your aunt and cousin Lorie. There are many differences between British English and American English. At times, they seem like two distinct languages.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

tipsheets,

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading and sharing my article.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Janine,

Thanks for reading my article, commenting in it, and sharing it. I appreciate your continued support of my writing.


Vellur profile image

Vellur 4 years ago from Dubai

Very useful and important to know. Thanks for sharing.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Nithya (Vellur),

Thanks for reading by article and adding your comment. I'm glad you found the information useful.


mjkearn profile image

mjkearn 4 years ago

Hi Daisy

Well presented hub and good video. Some interesting facilities there.

It takes a woman to ask for something sensible as my first thought would be to ask for directions to the nearest coffee shop.

Good job. Voted up and ticked.

MJ.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

MJ (mjkearn),

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.

I was surprised that I found the names of the architects of some of the facilities. One usually doesn't think of a public toilet as having an architect.


Sally's Trove profile image

Sally's Trove 4 years ago from Southeastern Pennsylvania

Very neat hub. Loved seeing the public facilities from around the world...some of them are indeed works of art.

When my mother was teaching my adult daughter Polish, the first phrase my daughter wanted to learn was, "Please give me a beer." My mother thought it quite fitting that the second phrase to be learned must be, "Where is the bathroom?" The two ladies had a huge chuckle over that exchange.

Up, interesting, and useful!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Sherri (Sally's Trove),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I, too, had a chuckle over the exchange between your mother and daughter. Thanks for sharing the anecdote with us.


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

When my daughter and SIL traveled through Europe this summer they were a bit shocked that toilets were as conveniently located like they are in the states. Oh my, count me out of traveling to Europe.

My addition to the list is "where's the can man"


quicksand profile image

quicksand 4 years ago

... and in Thai, it's "Horng Naam Yoo Tee Nai?" You add "Khrap" at the end if you are a male addressing any gender. If you are a female (addressing any gender) you add "Kha."

It's as simple as that! - Thai Airways flies to Bangkok from all major cities in the world.

(: --- Smiling ---:)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Linda (Sunshine625),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.

Thanks, too, for contributing your American English Slang version of this very important question to my article. I have revised my Hub to include your "translation."


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

You really did add it! Well it is a translation that's been around for many years:)


Mike Robbers profile image

Mike Robbers 4 years ago from London

quite interesting article ,, enjoyed it a lot :)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

quicksand,

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and providing the Thai translations.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Linda,

Thanks for visiting again. My articles are read by people all over the world. Including an American English Slang translation is culturally important.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mike,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting. I'm glad you enjoyed my Hub.


Stephanie Henkel profile image

Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

This sounds like a useful list to keep handy when traveling internationally! My very worst experience using a public restroom was on a ferry while traveling in Europe. After having had a few drinks on the long ride, I suddenly needed to use the ladies room. Once inside, I encountered a hole in the floor that you were supposed to straddle (standing up) and aim for while the boat rocked. By some miracle, I missed my shoes. Not fun!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Stephanie,

Thanks for reading my article and sharing your anecdote with us.

I spent six months living and working in Sweden several years ago. Some of the facilities there are unisex. The restrooms have a row of stalls with floor-to-ceiling doors and a row of sinks. It was an unusual experience standing at a sink washing my hands and seeing a man walk out of one of the stalls.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida

This is really helpful. I lived in Japan for four years in the seventies. And truthfully I do not recall how I found the potties there. I guess I followed everyone else and looked for the little international signs that directed me. I did have a few embarrassing moments...I was dining out with my husband one evening and had to go to the restroom. When I opened the door there was Japanese man right there using the restroom. O my. I hurried past to the next door and used the facility. Thank goodness he was gone when I had to emerge.

I know those who travel a great deal will find your hub helpful


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

pstraubie48,

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and including your anecdote in the comments.

When doing the research for my Hub, I found a list of phrases in phonetic Japanese that would be helpful to a tourist, but unlike other such lists, "Where is the toilet?" was not included.


rcrumple profile image

rcrumple 4 years ago from Kentucky

Daisy - Another great hub. I remember traveling around Europe many years ago finding this to be a necessary phrase to know. Many cities, at that time, simply had stalls in alleys for men to use. Not being a female, I don't remember anything for them. Bed and Breakfast sleepovers became difficult at times as one bathroom would service all of the rooms on that floor. Great Job!


Sharkye11 profile image

Sharkye11 4 years ago from Oklahoma

One of the most useful and interesting hubs ever! It is indeed an important question. Another useful thing fro travelers to know is how to read "mens" or "women's". I've heard some funny traveling stories about that too.

And if you have someone who is in the Navy, then you may be asked if you need the "head". That was a confusing moment.

Voting up and more!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Jayme (Sharkye11),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. There's usually some sort of symbol on the door in addition to the word, but a few times in my travels I've had to guess which room was which.


Jools99 profile image

Jools99 4 years ago from North-East UK

A useful guide; maybe THE most useful guide because there is nothing worse than getting caught short and not knowing how to ask for the 'smallest room in the house'! I could print this off as a useful A4 guide for wherever I am in the world :o)


b. Malin profile image

b. Malin 4 years ago

A very Interesting and Educational Hub... As well as a Useful Hub, Daisy. After all, when you've got to go...and Nature Calls, your've got to know how to Converse in any Language. Voted Up and Sharing!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Julie (Jools99),

Thanks for reading and commenting in my article. This is a bit of a change from the other Hubs in my "language" series, but as important...perhaps more so.

A useful tip if you're ever in Rio de Janeiro...

The toilet paper in the womens' facilities is on a roll just inside the entrance to the room. It isn't in every stall.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Barbara (b. Malin),

Thanks for reading and commenting in my article. Thanks, too, for sharing it.

I've written quite a few articles that could be considered edicational. This one, I think, is the most useful.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Rich (rcrumple),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I appreciate your continued support of my work.

Wikimedia Commons had more than one hundred photographs in the "public toilet" category. Two of the images which I did not choose to use depcted scenes similar to what you described in your comment.


The Frog Prince profile image

The Frog Prince 4 years ago from Arlington, TX

Let me see here Ms. Daisy - Where'd ya hide the can? That work?

The Frog


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Frog,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and commenting. Your American English Slang is very similar to the translation which Sunshine625 contributed.


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD

This is such an important hub. If there is one phrase you need to know when visiting other countries, it is "Where is the bathroom?" Thanks for sharing. I will keep this on hand if I travel outside the U.S.


Docmo profile image

Docmo 4 years ago from UK

I do love these language hubs that are both useful and fascinating to read, Daisy. Thanks for including my contribution. To be fair in India if you just raise your eyebrow Roger Moore style and go ' Toilet?' they will show you where. 'Enge' is phonetically 'En-Gay' means where? cool hub!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Jeannie,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I hope you get to use some of the translations on your travel adventures.


ivanmarginal profile image

ivanmarginal 4 years ago from Jakarta

Have you visited Indonesia? If so, kindly tell me now how to say it in Indonesian :)


GusTheRedneck profile image

GusTheRedneck 4 years ago from USA

Daisy Mariposa - There is likely no end (pun?) of funny tales (another pun?) that might come out of this very excellent and helpful article. I was reminded of two funny stories that have a certain kinship to your hub's subject.

The first will be quoting my German-language-speaking friend who, as we were both drinking a stein of beer in a country Gasthaus in Germany, I asked him what those two letters, "WC" above a door meant. He told me that they meant "water closet" (toilet), but "ve say zat like 'Vinston Churchill.'"

The second was part of a reading by our instructor of a class in medical writing. It was a reading of the humorous preamble to his paper by a world-famous surgeon - one who specialized in the surgical repair of hemorrhoids. His contention was that the surgeon must be careful when performing surgery of that sort so close as it was to the anal sphincter. He wrote that the sphincter was a remarkable circular muscle, unique among all of the body's many muscles as it, alone among all of them, ..."knew when you are alone or in a crowd..." There was considerable more. Our instructor used the surgeon's preamble to a very serious medical paper as an example of how the medical writer could instantly gain the full attention of the reader of what might be a rather "dull" piece of writing otherwise.

Any language that tells you what you need to know and where to do something about it is a good language. You show both wisdom and kindness in your revealing so many all on the same page. Thanks.

Gus :-)))


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mohan (Docmo),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. Thanks, too, for providing the Tamil translations. I appreciate your continuous support of my writing.

While searching Wikimedia Commons for public toilet photographs to use in the video, I found two images from India. They had legal attributions, so I could have used them, but I decided to pass. Both pictures were of "alley type" of "facilities" for men.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

ivanmarginal,

It's nice to meet you. I have never been to Indonesia. If you want to know how to say "Where is the toilet?" in Indonesian, you'll find the translation listed in my article.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Gus (GusTheRedneck),

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and adding your anecdotes.


Robin Oatley profile image

Robin Oatley 4 years ago

Very useful hub! I like to think that I know quite a lot of languages, but I certainly didn't know all of these.

Just a small note: you swapped the Danish and Dutch ones, and the Greek letters are missing ;)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Robin,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. Thanks, too, for noticing that I had transposed the Danish and Dutch translations.

I typed all of the translations into text capsules. The Arabic, Greek, Hebrew, Tamil, and a few other languages were presented as they were because my computer only has an English language keyboard.


ivanmarginal profile image

ivanmarginal 4 years ago from Jakarta

I missed that, sorry.

Di mana Toiletnya? (phonetically pronounced " DEE muh-nuh TOY-leht-nyuh") May I correct it? I'm an Indonesian :)

Di mana must be Dimana, and yes you're right, we pronounce A just like a native Englishman says U in 'UNDER' or U in 'HubPages'. So we simply read Under as A-nder. My English lecturer said that native Englishman may aspirate most words in Indonesian, so they'll always put h and h in every word just like muh-nuh. Thanks for sharing!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

ivanmarginal,

Thanks for visitng again. Thanks, too, for providing the correction to the Indonesian translation.


alocsin profile image

alocsin 4 years ago from Orange County, CA

Talk about a requirement for every foreign traveler! I'll clip this and put it in my travel bag. But what are the chances of adding the MP3 pronunciations for each of these phrases? Voting this Up and Useful.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Aurelio (alocsin),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.

You've made a great suggestion. I'll see if I can find MP3 recordings of this very important phrase.


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 4 years ago

I don't know how you got all the photos for the toilets in your post, but wow, they are pretty interesting. If I go to any of these countries, I will know what to look for now (after I use the right phrase!). Enjoyed your share of how your friend asked for the bath room. Voted up.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Dianna (teaches12345),

Thanks for viewing my video, reading my article, and adding your comment. I appreciate your continued support of my writing.

I've found that Wikimedia Commons is the best source for photographs with legal attributions for my Hubs. I searched on "public toilet" and was rewarded by more than 100 photos of facilities around the world. It's very rare that if I don't have my own images, I'm unable to find the ones I need on Wikimedia Commons.


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 4 years ago from United States

When you are in another country this is the most important question. Clever hub and funny.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Pam (Pamela99),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I like publishing Hubs from which my readers can learn something. It looks as though I've succeeded with this article.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 4 years ago from California

Great hub!


Suzie HQ profile image

Suzie HQ 4 years ago from Dublin, Ireland

Hi Daisy,

What a very useful and interesting subject that we all need to know when travelling or even eating out sometimes. I have had to use a number of your list on my travels. Enjoyed your pic of Kitzbuhel Austria. Brought back great memories as I learnt to ski there. Voted up +++++ shared!


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Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Audrey,

It's nice to "see" you again. I'm glad you liked by Hub.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Suzie,

It's nice to "see" you again. The Kitzbühel photo I found on Wikimedia Commons was recent...taken only five months ago, in May. It's interesting to see the area without snow.


midget38 profile image

midget38 4 years ago from Singapore

Daisy, another well-researched hub. This is important for those who will be traveling as they would need to use these translations! I will share this.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Michelle (midget38).

Thanks for reading my article, commenting, and sharing my Hub. I appreciate your support of my work.

Three days after publication, this is my Hub with the highest Hub Score. I never imagined an article concerned with this subject matter would do so well.


nifwlseirff profile image

nifwlseirff 4 years ago from Villingen Schwenningen, Germany

In Japanese, the simplest is (phonetically): Toire wa doko desu ka?

Or more politely: Otearai wa doko desu ka? (the 'o' makes 'teari' more polite).

pstraubi48 - I found the double rest rooms weird too! I came across two types while living there. Near bars and clubs, you had to go through a section with the pissoir to get to the toilet. No mens'/womens' distinctions made. At my workplace, there was one shared room with a half divider wall - urinals on the left, toilets on the right. Felt extremely odd and at times, more than a little uncomfortable!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Kymberly (nifwlseirff),

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article, adding your anecdotes within your comment, and providing the Japanese translations. I appreciate your support.


ChristyWrites profile image

ChristyWrites 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

What a useful hub Daisy. I can see why you earn so many comments! The words really need to be learned whenever venturing to another country. Vote up and sharing over on Twitter as well.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Christy,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article, commenting in it, and sharing it on Twitter. I enjoy writing Hubs in which my readers learn something new. I'm glad so many people have found this article to be helpful.

I've written a Hub about greeting people and saying "hello" in other countries. I expect to publish it later today.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 4 years ago from Udorn City, Thailand

Daisy,

This is a very useful hub for the globe trotter. When asking for the bathroom, some Chinese Mandarin speakers will say "xishoujian zai nali?" A Taiwanese speaker will say "benso di douwee?" Voted up as useful and sharing.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Paul,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting. Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub. I'm glad you found the information to be useful.


Miss Mimi profile image

Miss Mimi 4 years ago from On the road again

This is an awesome list! Nice work with the phonetic pronunciation guides, I don't know most of these, but the Catalan, Croatian, Czech, French and German are all spot on, and I think figuring out how to write other languages phonetically is quite tricky. It's not a huge deal, because most Canadians also speak American English, but you might add to your list that in Canada it's always called the washroom. Voted up and sharing with my many traveling friends!


jimmythejock profile image

jimmythejock 4 years ago from Scotland

Hi Daisy, In Scotland we have the bog, the cludgie, the crapper and the pee hoose (house) to choose from when we need to go.

loved this hub voted up and all of the others.....jimmy


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Miss Mimi,

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for viewing the video, reading my article, commenting, and providing me with the Candian English version of the question.

Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub. I appreciate it.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Jimmy (jimmythejock),

I'm glad you enjoyed reading my article. Thanks for providing me with the four Scottish English versions of this all-important question.


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 4 years ago from New York

You just keep building on a great and educational idea....these hubs offer so much to the uninitiated! Let's face it, as Alecia said, we all need to use the loo! AND your opening presentation is fantastic!!!

Voted up, useful, and interesting....need an educational button!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mary (tillsontitan),

Thanks for viewing my video, reading my article, and commenting. I appreciate your very kind words.

I was so pleased that Wikimedia Commons had more than 100 photographs of public toilets uploaded to their site. Some of the facilities even had the name of the architect listed in the photo credits!


Thelma Alberts profile image

Thelma Alberts 4 years ago from Germany

Cleaver hub! This is usually the first question I ask when I´m in another country. In Tagalog, the Philippine language, it is " Saan ang inidoro? or "Saan ang kasilyas?" It is spoken the way it´s written...The first is, where is the toilet. The second is, where is the restroom. Thanks for sharing. Voted up and shared.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Thelma,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for viewing the video, reading my article, and commenting.

Thanks, too, for providing the Tagalog translations. I added them to my Hub.


ignugent17 profile image

ignugent17 4 years ago

Thanks for sharing this very useful words. This is really necessary. It is always nice to know the words.

When I first arrived here I always ask the toilet but they usually say bathroom. :-)

I would also add in Filipino. Thelma gave you some but we have so many dialects so you can also use. " Saan ang Palikuran?"

Thanks enjoyed reading your hub.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

ignugent17,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for viewing my video, reading my article, and commenting. If you tell me the name of the dialect, I'll be glad to add your translation.


Louisa Rogers profile image

Louisa Rogers 3 years ago from Eureka, California and Guanajuato, Mexico

Great list! A little off topic, but an interesting fact is, if you happen to be in an English home, and the loo door is closed, that does NOT mean it is occupied. They close the bathroom door rotuinely. If it's locked, it's obviously in use, but otherwise they just close it. More squeamish than Americans, I guess! I've had many an uncomfortable wait that was completely unnecessary until I learned this! Voted up, useful & interesting. Thanks.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Louisa,

Thanks for viewing my video, reading my article, and commenting. I appreciate it.


DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 3 years ago from Oakley, CA

Very interesting, though I have no travel budget these days, and will probably never use any of these, it is fun to learn anyway.

Don't forget there is a multitude of American English slang and jargon as well: young children will often ask for the "pot," or "potty;" (and if you're camping with Girl Scouts, "the biffy,"), also on board a boat, it's the "head," and if you're dealing with former Army folks, you ask for the "latrine." Just some fun additions for you.

Voted up, interesting and useful.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Liz (MsLizzy),

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. When I get a chance, I'll add to my article the military slang versions you provided.

One never knows when the information contained in my Hub will come in handy. I was very glad I knew the Spanish and Portuguese translations while traveling in South America several years ago.


Kathryn Stratford profile image

Kathryn Stratford 3 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

Very handy! Thanks for sharing with us.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Kathryn,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. When I began doing the research for my Hub, I was surprised at how many photographs I found on Wikimedia Commons.


Vinaya Ghimire profile image

Vinaya Ghimire 3 years ago from Nepal

Daisy,

In Nepal people use American as well as British English in spoken and written language. English as a second languages confuses so many people that sometimes the same person uses both language.

I wish you a very Happy Birthday.

Cheers


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Vinaya,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.

Thanks, too, for your birthday wishes.


Vector design profile image

Vector design 3 years ago from California

nice tips for asking about where is the bathroom. i like your hub.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Saim (Vector design),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I appreciate it.


midget38 profile image

midget38 3 years ago from Singapore

Important words for travelers to learn. Sharing again, Daisy!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Michelle (midget38),

Thanks for visiting again and sharing my article another time. I appreciate your support of my writing.

My Hub is probably the type of article which should be bookmarked, That way, readers will have the information readily available when they are planning their next trip.


Sue Bailey profile image

Sue Bailey 3 years ago from South Yorkshire, UK

This is great Daisy. We do sometimes ask for the bathroom in the UK but more often it's the toilet or the loo.


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

Hi Daisy, I know its meant to be serious, but it was funny, especially jimmys and lindas ideas! seriously though, isn't it strange how toilet seems to be in most of the words? even though the pronunciation is different. Over here in England it is usually, bog, loo, wizz or toilet! lol!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Nell,

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment.

The comments by my readers are an important part of this Hub. If the comments added humor to the subject, it's OK with me. I hadn't thought about it until you mentioned it, but you're correct...many of the translations are based upon the word "toilet."


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 3 years ago from Orlando, FL

Where's the can, man? Is still my favorite! :)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Linda (Sunshine625),

Thanks for visiting again. Your American Slang contribution to the list is very helpful.


jenbeach21 profile image

jenbeach21 3 years ago from Orlando, FL

Very useful hub and hopefully I would remember some of it when it was useful!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Jen (jenbeach21),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. What some readers have done is print the text of my linguistics Hubs before they go on vacation. They've brought the papers with them.


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

This is great for anyone who gets 'caught short' lol! our local lingo always says, 'Wheres the bog? haha!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Nell,

Thanks for reading my article another time. I appreciate it.


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 2 years ago from Orlando, FL

When you gotta go, you gotta go and it's good to know how to ask for the potty...


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Linda (Sunshine625),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I was in Caracas, Venezuela on Christmas Day a number of years ago...an excursion from a cruise ship. Very few souvenir shops were open, and the ones that were wouldn't let anyone use their toilets. I couldn't wait until we were back on the ship. I saw a very imposing-looking government building with the main entrance door open. I went inside and asked the armed guard if there was a toilet I could use. Thankfully, he understood my Spanish, and yes, there was a women's restroom I could use.


lambservant profile image

lambservant 2 years ago from Pacific Northwest

Very informative and interesting, and amusing too. I think I loved the Scottish expressions the most.


Paula Atwell profile image

Paula Atwell 2 years ago from Cleveland, OH

Definitely important information to know. :)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Lori (lambservant),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I was surprised I was able to find so many legally-attributable images to include in my Hub.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Paula,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. Knowing how to ask this very important question is a lot better than having to resort to pantomime.

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