How to Count from 1 to 10 in Korean

So there are basically two types of Korean numbers for everyday use.

The first one is called native Korean numbers which are from Korean native origin.

The second type of Korean numbers is called "Sino-Korean numbers." As in "Sino," it obviously means the numbers were originated from China.

The usage varies according to the context.

Native Korean Numbers 1-10

  • 1: 하나 [hanah]
  • 2: 둘 [dhool] pronounced kinda like in the middle of [dool] and [tool]
  • 3: 셋 [set] (if pronounced alone) pronounced [seh] if it's used before another word
  • 4: 넷 [net] (if pronounced alone) pronounced [neh] if it's used before another word
  • 5: 다섯 [dhasot] pronounced in between [tasot] and [dasot]
  • 6: 여섯 [Yosot]
  • 7: 일곱 [ilgob]
  • 8: 여덟 [yodol]
  • 9: 아홉 [ahob]
  • 10: 열 [yol]

Note: the ending consonant [t] in the pronunciation guide is silent.

Usage: Native Korean numbers are used for counting objects and persons (mostly proceeded with counter words), years, hours, month, or just plain counting.

Let's try practicing it with native Korean speaker in the video below. (Credit: TalkToMeInKorean)

Sino-Korean Numbers 1-10

This one is easier:

  • 1: 일 [il]
  • 2: 이 [ee]
  • 3: 삼 [sahm]
  • 4: 사 [sah]
  • 5: 오 [oh]
  • 6: 육 [yook]
  • 7: 칠 [chil]
  • 8: 팔 [pahl]
  • 9: 구 [khoo] in between [koo] and [goo]
  • 10: 십 [shib]

Note: the ending consonant [k] in the pronunciation guide is silent.

Usage: Sino-Korean numbers are used for minutes, seconds, money, math, measurements (kilometers, grams etc.), phone numbers etc.

Watch another video below to know more clearly how the actual pronunciation is (credit: TalkToMeInKorean)

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