In Search of Aesop - historical figure or myth?

Portrait of Aesop ~

Aesop Portrait by Diego Velazquez (1599 - 1660). Portrait is in the collection of the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain
Aesop Portrait by Diego Velazquez (1599 - 1660). Portrait is in the collection of the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain | Source

Writer of fables ~

Aesop, writer of fables, was supposedly born in 619 BCE and died in 559 BCE. He is best known as "The Fabulist", credited with "The Tortoise and the Hare". It is uncertain as to where his birthplace was and some scholars debate if he really existed. Was Aesop really a historical figure or a myth?

There are no writings by Aesop that survived. Numerous fables were, however, attributed to him. In the centuries since Aesop's death -- these attributions have been gathered and set in writing by many scholars as a collection of Aesop's Fables.

In the folk book titled The Aesop Romance, it is written that Aesop wrote down his fables and deposited them in the library of King Croesus -- yet, the book is considered a fiction by an unknown writer, embellished over the years by other scholars or writers. From 560 to 547 BC, Croesus was the king of Lydia. Scholars speculate whether or not Aesop actually wrote the fables. Yet by the time of Classical Greece, the fables were widely known and still attributed to Aesop. The works of Aesop's Fables was transcribed by several writers in both Greek and Latin. Over time many authors made collections of the fables, but they have all been lost.

The Tortoise and the Hare ~

"The Tortoise and the Hare", from an edition of Aesop's Fables illustrated by Arthur Rackham, 1912 ~
"The Tortoise and the Hare", from an edition of Aesop's Fables illustrated by Arthur Rackham, 1912 ~ | Source

Ancient sources ~

Aristotle (384 BCE - 322 BCE) and other early Greek sources indicate that Aesop was born around 620 BCE in Thrace at a site on the Black Sea coast. Later sources from the Roman imperial period claim Aesop was born in Phrygia, a kingdom in the west central part of Anatolia, in what is now modern-day Turkey. Callimachus (310 BCE - 240 BCE) a poet, called the famed writer "Aesop of Sardis". Maximus of Tyre (late 2nd century AD), a Greek rhetorician and philosopher, referred to Aesop as "the sage of Lydia".

Either Aesop travelled a lot, or there was much confusion and speculation about his true life. Aristotle and Herodotus claimed Aesop was a slave in Samos, a Greek island in the eastern Aegean Sea. In the time when Aesop lived, Samos was a particularly rich and powerful city-state.

Aesop reportedly was very intelligent and highly respected by the people who personally knew him, for both Aristotle and Herodotus told of how Aesop must eventually have been freed from his bondage when he argued as an advocate for a wealthy Samian. Plutarchus (46 - 150 CE), a Greek historian, biographer, and essayist, claimed that Aesop was sent to Delphi on a diplomatic mission by King Croesus of Lydia. Also, according to Plutarchus, Aesop dined with the Seven Sages of Greece, as he sat beside his friend, Solon, who was an Athenian statesman, lawmaker, and poet. Aesop, obviously traveled with well known, intelligent, and wealthy people.

Herodotus (484 -425 BCE), the Greek historian known as the "Father of History", was known to have referred to Aesop as the "fable writer".

Throughout Greek and Roman history, Aesop was often mentioned and accredited with a plethora of fables. In modern times, scholars still have no proof that a real Aesop ever existed. Martin Litchfield West, a British Professor known as "the most brilliant and productive Greek scholar of his generation." (source: British Academy: Medals and Prizes, Kenyon Medal), wrote:

The name of Aesop is as widely known as any that has come down from Graeco-Roman antiquity (yet) it is far from certain whether a historical Aesop ever existed ... in the latter part of the fifth century something like a coherent Aesop legend appears, and Samos seems to be its home.

— Martin Litchfield West

The Fox and the Crane ~

Statues of the Fox and the Crane, in the labyrinth of Versailles
Statues of the Fox and the Crane, in the labyrinth of Versailles | Source

Fables built with truths ~

Fables are fiction, originally told orally. Over the centuries since Aesop lived, the fables have been told with variations, depending on the individual storyteller's own interpretations.

However, the fable will always be built upon truths. Even though Aesop fables are usually told with animal characters, such as The Beaver, or The Lion and the Mouse, they contain truths for humans to take note of and learn. In the Life of Apollonius of Tyana, Book V:14, by Lucius Flavius Philostratus (c. 170/172 - 247/250) an ancient Greek philosopher, credited Apollonius of Tyana (c. 15 CE - c. 100 CE), another ancient Greek philosopher, with saying about Aesop:

" ... like those who dine well off the plainest dishes, he made use of humble incidents to teach great truths, and after serving up a story he adds to it the advice to do a thing or not to do it. Then, too, he was really more attached to truth than the poets are; for the latter do violence to their own stories in order to make them probable; but he by announcing a story which everyone knows not to be true, told the truth by the very fact that he did not claim to be relating real events."

Fables have been used for centuries by parents and other elders as lessons for children. 'The Boy Who Cried Wolf' is a perfect example to teach children not to lie, especially when it comes to danger. The boy, probably from boredom, intended to play a joke on the village folks by shouting in a scared voice that the wolf was attacking the sheep. He thought it quite funny to see the villagers come running to save him and the sheep and repeated the joke a few times, each time laughing at his trick. When the wolf really did come to attack, the villagers did not believe his cry for help was real, so did not come to help. Therein lies the moral: do not joke around and lie about danger or you will not be helped when danger is really about to happen.

Another example for children, and adults as well, is the story of the 'Ant and the Chrysalis', which teaches that appearances are often deceptive. The ant feels that the ugly chrysalis is pitiful and makes fun of its appearance and inability to travel as the ant does. A few days later, the ant sees that the shell is empty and notices that the chrysalis had become a beautiful butterfly. The butterfly gracefully floats away in the summer breeze, never to be seen again by the ant. The ant did not see the beauty within the chrysalis and therefore lost sight of it forever.

This is much like the disdain and laughter Aesop received from others because of his appearance. They did not look beyond the appearance to see the beauty within, which was a clever and creative mind that could tell interesting stories with a lesson to be learned.

The Boy Who Cried Wolf ~

Francis Barlow's illustration of The Boy Who Cried Wolf, 1687
Francis Barlow's illustration of The Boy Who Cried Wolf, 1687 | Source

Depictions of Aesop ~

Many drawings of Aesop show a man of stubby physique, with short legs,a humpback, an enlarged head and over-sized upper torso, with a concave chest. His face is distorted and ugly, with a protruding lower lip. He is shown with a mass of thick curls covering his head. Artistic depictions of him were not kind to Aesop. There is one portrait by Diego Velazquez (1599 - 1660) of Aesop that shows a kindly face and a more normal physique, showing no physical deformities.

This description of the lost painting portrays Aesop as well-loved and honored by his fable characters. Many early scholars, such as Himerius, a 4th century Greek sophist, who said that Aesop was laughed at "not because of his tales, but on account of his looks ..."

It is probable that the artist of the lost painting could see Aesop as the animals did, rather than laugh at him as people did.

Maximus Planudes (c. 1260 - c. 1305), a Greek monk and scholar, wrote a biography of Aesop in which he states that Aesop's complexion "was black, from which dark Tincture he contracted his Name (Aesopus being the same with Aethiops)". Later scholars, Gert-Jan van Dijk and Frank Snowden refute the account that Aesop was a black African from Ethiopia. It is interesting that the biography written by Panudes was based on The Aesop Romance, which is known to be a fiction.

Portrait of Aesop ~

If you could paint a portrait of Aesop, what would he look like?

  • Scholarly and wise, as Diego Velázquez portrayed him.
  • Uniquely different as in the woodcut in Spain.
  • I am not sure how to portray him.
See results without voting

Philostratus the Elder (c. 190 – c. 230), a sophist (a teacher who used philosophy and rhetoric as teaching tools) of the Roman imperial period described a lost painting of Aesop:

"The Fables are gathering about Aesop, being fond of him because he devotes himself to them. For... he checks greed and rebukes insolence and deceit, and in all this some animal is his mouthpiece — a lion or a fox or a horse... and not even the tortoise is dumb — that through them children may learn the business of life. So the Fables, honoured because of Aesop, gather at the doors of the wise man to bind fillets about his head and to crown him with a victor’s crown of wild olive."

A woodcut of Aesop ~

A woodcut from La vida del Ysopet con sus fabulas historiadas (Spain, 1489) depicting a hunchbacked Aesop surrounded by events from the stories in Planudes' ver
A woodcut from La vida del Ysopet con sus fabulas historiadas (Spain, 1489) depicting a hunchbacked Aesop surrounded by events from the stories in Planudes' ver | Source

The Aesop Romance ~

The Aesop Romance is a work of fiction by an anonymous Greek author. It was composed sometime around the second century AD. or possibly in the first century AD. (source: Leslie Kurke, "Aesop and the Contestation of Delphic Authority", in The Cultures Within Ancient Greek Culture: Contact, Conflict, Collaboration, ed. Carol Dougherty and Leslie Kurke, p. 77.).

Over the centuries different writers added to it or changed the original to such a degree that it became contradictory long before it was put in writing.

In the romantic fiction, the beautiful Rhodope is in love with the the slave Aesop. An engraving by Francesco Bartolozzi (based on a painting by Angelica Kauffman) symbolically depicts the two lovers as complete opposites: beautiful and common, light and dark, graceful and awkward. Rhodope reaches to Aesop with her open palm up while Aesop gestures with his palm down to the caged doves. The doves are white, a sign of love and peace. A raven below them is dark, a sign of mystery or ill omen. Aesop, gesturing to the caged doves may be reminding Rhodope that he, too, is caged because he is a slave. Aesop is all in dark, Rhodope all in white.

Eventually, the two lovers part and Rhodope becomes the wife of an Egyptian Pharaoh.

Aesop and Rhodope ~

Aesop and Rhodope, engraving by Bartolozzi, 1782, after Kauffman's original
Aesop and Rhodope, engraving by Bartolozzi, 1782, after Kauffman's original | Source

Aesop and Priests ~

Aesop and Priests as depicted by Francis Barlow in the 1687 edition of Aesop's Fables with His Life
Aesop and Priests as depicted by Francis Barlow in the 1687 edition of Aesop's Fables with His Life | Source

Tragic end ~

Sadly, Aesop came to a tragic end. Around 564 BCE, when on his diplomatic mission from King Croesus, Aesop met with a violent death. Plutarchus said that Aesop insulted the Delphians in some manner. A trumped-up charge falsely accused him of stealing from a temple. Aesop was sentenced to death and thrown from a cliff. In retribution from an unknown source, the Delphians then suffered a pestilence and famine.

Aesop's fables are famous world wide. His short tales portrayed human nature and life's truths. A fable is a short story with a moral -- often using animals or inanimate objects as characters. The moral is to make the distinction between the right way and the wrong way of doing things.

If Aesop did in fact exist, it is easy to imagine why he wrote fables about the truths in life and learning right from wrong. Aesop was not only a slave, but, of abnormal stature and appearance. He was depicted in sculpture, paintings and woodcuts as a dwarfish hunchback with deformed facial features and disproportionate limbs and body. How he was treated in life may have influenced his writings.

If he really had been a dwarfish hunchback with deformed features and still treated with respect and honour, then this could very well have been an inspiration for writing tales of right and wrong and how one should be treated kindly by others.

Statue of Aesop ~

Hellenistic statue claimed to depict Aesop, Art  Collection of Villa Albani, Rome
Hellenistic statue claimed to depict Aesop, Art Collection of Villa Albani, Rome | Source

Aesop - historical figure or myth?

There has not been any concrete evidence of proof that Aesop really existed. Scholars are still debating and researching today to find the truth. Yet, Aesop has been discussed, painted, sculpted, written about by so many well known ancient and modern sources for over 2500 years.

Were all the fables simply a collection of the oral stories from unknown people? If so, it is understandable that a man, a fable himself, would have been created by someone to add purpose and depth to the moralistic fables. Who better than a gentle man who loved nature and sought to teach, in a delightful way, right from wrong?

It would be difficult for many, the world over, to say Aesop was not a real person. Regardless of the many different depictions and conflicting stories of his life, Aesop is a well-loved writer of fables.
~ ~ ~ ~

Aesop ~

Note from author ~

Thank you for reading my article. Your opinions are important to me and let me know your interests. This helps me to offer more of your favorite subjects to read about. Your time and interest are very much appreciated. I hope to hear from you in the comments section below.

I write on several different subjects, all evergreen articles. You can read more about me and see more articles I wrote by clicking on my name by the small picture of me at the top right of this page.

Blessings and may you always walk in peace and harmony, softly upon Mother Earth.

Phyllis Doyle Burns - Lantern Carrier, Spiritual Mentor
~ ~ ~ ~


© 2014 Phyllis Doyle Burns

More by this Author


Comments 44 comments

Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

Another wonderful hub from you Phyllis. I just recently read another hub about Aesop's fables (which I love by the way), but this hub of yours was very interesting and questioning whether he was in fact a real person or fictional. The thought that he may have been a hunchback dwarf reminded me a little of one of my early childrens poems "Grunge the Grump". Voted up as always.


Nadine May profile image

Nadine May 2 years ago from Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

That was truly an interesting read. Story tellers have always been around, I'm sure. Any romantic fiction, like the beautiful Rhodope is in love with the the slave Aesop, reminds me a lot of the fables by brothers Grimm. One of them might have been a reincarnation of Aesop? This kind of article about an individual I had never heard about has enriched my general knowledge repertoire. Many thanks. Voted up!


Frank Atanacio profile image

Frank Atanacio 2 years ago from Shelton

Thank you Phyillis for keeping writing giaints fresh in our minds.. and to some the hearts. We all have a little Aesop in us.. im glad your research made this article a proven literature myth and/or fact voted awesome


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Jodah, always right here with a good word for my newest hub -- thank you so much for your comment. "Grunge the Grump". I would like to read that. Is it here on your HP page? I will go explore. I will also have to go read the other hub on Aesop's fables, thanks for mentioning that. Thank you as always for the vote. I so appreciate you.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Nadine May. You are very welcome for introducing you to Aesop, real or not, he was quite an interesting person. You know, I never thought about it, but, I bet you are right about the Brothers Grimm borrowing an idea from Aesop. Thank you so much for reading and commenting. And many thanks for the vote.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

You are most welcome, Frank. I am so glad you enjoyed the hub. It is really funny that as I was writing the closing paragraph, I thought about storytellers on HP and you and Jodah came to mind as top of the list. Thank you, Frank, for reading, commenting and the vote. I so appreciate you.


Marie Flint profile image

Marie Flint 2 years ago from Jacksonville, FL

I always considered him real without question. The dictionary reference gives his life years as circa 560-620 BC. His sayings rather remind me of Benjamin Franklin's writings in Poor Richard's Almanac.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

Thanks Phyllis. Grunge the Grump is in my collection called "Verse for the Young at Heart". I can't remember who wrote the other Aesop hub Phyllis but I know I read it yesterday. My memory isn't as good as it used to be.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Marie. I always believed Aesop was real, but scholars have been debating about it for a long time -- that really surprised me. I love Aesop's fables. Thanks for the visit and comment, I really appreciate it.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Ah ! Thanks for the follow up. I will go find Grunge. Don't feel bad about the memory thing. I often stand at a door wondering if I was going out or just came in. LOL


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 2 years ago from North Carolina

Used to read a book of Aesop's as a kid and have always wondered about the man or what's known about him. You supplied that in spades. Wonderful subject and write friend, Phyllis.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Thank you very much, Alastar. As a child I imagined Aesop as a larger than life wise man. He is an amazing study. Thanks for stopping by and commenting, Alastar -- I always appreciate your visits. Have a wonderful day my friend.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 2 years ago from The Beautiful South

What a special article! I just love it. You have put so much into it and done a beautiful job. This deserves 100! Voted up and sharing. ^+


DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image

DrBill-WmL-Smith 2 years ago from Hollister, MO

Aesop would have loved HubPages! Thanks for sharing!! ;-)


The Examiner-1 profile image

The Examiner-1 2 years ago

This was amazing Phyllis, I never thought of him as a myth. I cannot believe that there are no photos or records of his life, not even his writing. Sure, I read his stories in childhood but it is as an adult that I cannot believe this. I definitely voted this up+++, shared and G+ it.

Kevin


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Wow, Jackie -- I hope it gets 100. Thank you so much for such a wonderful and kind comment, the votes and sharing. I so appreciate this.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

DrBill, I do believe you are right -- Aesop would be right at home here with all of us. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

My goodness, Kevin -- many thanks for your visit and votes. I am so glad you enjoyed reading about Aesop. I believe Aesop was a real person, but there is no documentation at all on his birth, life or death -- just hearsay. Plus there are so many discrepancies about his life. Thanks again, Kevin.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 2 years ago from Southern Illinois

I do believe Aesop was a real person, his fables live on and it's true, they all teach a lesson of sorts. I hope he was a tall handsome man with no deformities. I really enjoyed reading your hub. Your detailed writing about him makes him believable. Thank you.


James-wolve profile image

James-wolve 2 years ago from Morocco

Well done! Hats off to you!I enjoyed reading this wellwritten and fascinating biography ! Voted up.


sheilamyers 2 years ago

This was an interesting and entertaining hub. While I've read the fables, I never took the time to learn about the who wrote them. Whether he really existed may be one of those mysteries that are never solved.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Ruby. I tend to agree with you that Aesop was a real historical person. You are right, his fables are timeless. -- we all can find meaningful messages in them. Thank you so much for stopping by and commenting.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Wonderful, James -- so glad you enjoyed it. Thanks you so much for you very kind praise, I really appreciate it.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Sheila. I agree the mystery may never be solved -- it has been over 2500 years of research and debate as to whether or not Aesop was a real person. There is one story about him I found intriguing: it says that Aesop was not very intelligent and a poor speaker. But, when he paid devotion and loving attention to a priestess of Isis, he was granted the gift of excellent speech and high intelligence. A lovely story. I have always seen Aesop as a lover of Nature and a gentle teacher to mankind. Thank you so much for reading and commenting.


DDE profile image

DDE 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

I found this hub to be interesting, informative and well researched.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Thank you very much, Devika.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 2 years ago from Dallas, Texas

This was quite an interesting hub, Phyllis. I never questioned if Aesop was a real person or not. If he wasn't, I wonder who wrote all these lovely stories. His stature might have led to ridicule and persecution, in those ancient times. I can see where this might have inspired him to write about moral values.


carrie Lee Night profile image

carrie Lee Night 2 years ago from Northeast United States

Voted useful! :). Never heard of the guy but know his fables. Thank you for teaching me something new and interesting today. I enjoyed the read.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Peg. Thank you for reading and commenting. If Aesop was not real, the stories must have been gathered from different folks, or a common school of thought where there was a need for all the moral stories to come from one person. I prefer to think Aesop was a real person. Thanks again, Peg.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Carrie. You are most welcome. Glad to know you enjoyed the article. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.


manatita44 profile image

manatita44 2 years ago from london

Admirably written, Phyllis. I enjoyed this very much.

You discussed in a clever way yet left it open to the reader to decide about Aesops. Great skill here. Since he has survived for so long, it is highly likely that he was real, but embellished no doubt. I would suspect that he was very wise, but also not blessed outwardly. These things have their own way of helping as an catalyst to inspire higher truths

So good of you to write this. Much peace..


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Manatita, it is good to hear from you. I am so glad you enjoyed my writing about Aesop. He was certainly a very interesting figure. I agree with you on your thoughts of the fable writer. The physical portrayal of Aesop is the epitome of the belief that one must look beyond the image to see the truth and beauty within, and as you so beautifully express: "These things have their own way of helping as an catalyst to inspire higher truths."

Many thanks and higher blessings to you. In Peace and harmony ...


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 2 years ago from West Virginia

You know it is funny about him and that of Jesus's teaching and how Rome is all involved in these stories and people's lives. This is a great hub. The reason that I laugh is that a while ago I told some Lay Dominican that the Bible was like Aesop's fables. Boy did I get a load of religious cr*p.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Debbie. Thanks for stopping by, reading and commenting. Glad you liked the hub. Your thoughts on Aesop and the bible are very interesting. Have a great evening.


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 2 years ago

I still love to read the fables I read as a child. They have to much to teach us. As you say, parents can help children build values through the story sharing. You have listed some of my favorites here. Thanks for the enjoyable read.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

You are most welcome, Diana. I am so glad you enjoyed reading this hub. Aesop fables were always a favorite of mine. Thanks for the visit.


Dolores Monet profile image

Dolores Monet 2 years ago from East Coast, United States

Hi Phyllis - since Aesop was mentioned by so many ancient historians and seems to have such a rich life story, why do so many think that he did not actually exit? I remember reading Aesop's fables to my kids when they were young. Imagine creating stories that are told over and over for thousands of years!


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

Fascinating! I never really thought about who Aesop was. Too bad about his tragic end.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Dolores. I agree with you that if so many historians spoke of Aesop, he must have been a real person. I wonder if any of my stories will last so long? LOL Aesop fables are timeless and a joy to read. Thanks, Dolores, for reading and commenting.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Rebecca. Thanks for stopping by and commenting. I was really surprised to find out that Aesop died in such a manner.


RonElFran profile image

RonElFran 2 years ago from Mechanicsburg, PA

Of course Aesop really existed! That's what I want to believe, anyway. Given the human propensity to take as much credit for our work as possible, it would be odd for so many stories to be attributed to a man who never lived.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

I agree, RonElFran. My thoughts are that only one person wrote those fables, for they all have the same purpose: lessons of morality and justice., taught by the use of animals as characters. If others wrote those fables they would not be credited to one man. Thank you for stopping by, reading and commenting. I appreciate this.


MelRootsNWrites profile image

MelRootsNWrites 2 years ago from California

Phyllis, this was fascinating. I guess I never gave it much thought as to whether Aesop existed or not. I supposed the stories could have grown from oral traditions and somehow over time had a name attached to them.

If he was a real person, something strikes me. Since he was a slave, was his abilities as a fablist or story teller what gained him freedom/status? Would this have been a valued skill during those times?


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Melody. I never realized there was any doubt about Aesop's existence till I began researching to find as much as I could about him. It surprised me that scholars much later after his time have questioned whether Aesop was real.

Apparently, Aesop was quite intelligent and managed to gain his freedom by being an adviser to kings and government officials. A good friend of Aesop was Solon, a statesman and lawmaker of Athens. Aesop and Solon dined with the Seven Sages of Greece -- it is believed by some scholars that Aesop was being considered as a member of the Seven Sages.

Thank you, Melody, for stopping by and commenting. I really appreciate it.

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