Interview with Mother Goose

Mother Goose Rhymes Revised

This was not an easy interview to conduct. Yes, I still possess those supernatural powers that enable me to interview undead celebrities like Genghis Khan, Jack the Ripper, and James Dean. And I have retained the ability to talk with weird animals like the Proboscis Monkey, the Star Nosed Mole and the charming Hippopotamus.

But this interview was much more difficult. Like you, I had always believed that Mother Goose was a legend and not a real person. Was I dead wrong, you'll pardon the expression? Please read on to discover the amazing facts.

meMy voluminous, painstaking research has led me to find you. Are both of you really the famous Mother Goose?

Queen Bertrada II of LaonOui, je suis elle. Yes, I am she.

Queen Berthe de BurgundyNon, non, non. Je suis elle. I am Mother Goose.

me – Wait a minute! You are both Mother Gooses . . . er, Mother Geese?

BertradaMais bien sûr, mon ami.But of course, my friend.

me – My French leaves a lot to be desired. May we do this in English?

Bertrada amd Berthe(in unison) Mais oui. But yes!

me – You are both former queens of France and both your names in English are Bertha?


Queen Bertrada II of Laon, wife of King Pepin the Short
Queen Bertrada II of Laon, wife of King Pepin the Short
Charlemagne
Charlemagne

I am Mother Goose

Bertrada That is correct. My full name is Queen Bertrada II of Laon and I married Pepin, the Short, the King of the Franks, in 740 A.D.

The people called him Pepin the Short because he resembled Danny DeVito in stature.

I am Mother Goose. My subjects called me Queen ‘Goose-foot’ because one of my feet was larger and shaped somewhat like the foot of a goose.

But it was not webbed no matter what anyone says. As you can plainly see . . . if I remove my large, oversized shoe.

I have another claim to fame as well. I am the mother of Charlemagne, my over-achieving son, who became the founder and ruler of the Holy Roman Empire.

And he was home schooled . . . by me. I was known as a devoted patroness of children.


Queen Berthe of Burgundy and King Robert II
Queen Berthe of Burgundy and King Robert II

I am the genuine Mother Goose.

BertheAttendez un moment! – wait a minute! Bertrada is always bragging. My name is Queen Berthe de Burgundy and I married King Robert II of France in the 10th century.

I am the genuine Mother Goose. I was known by my subjects as la mère d’oie – Mother Goose – a charming ‘bird-mother’ who spent my days 24/7 sharing enchanting fairy tales and rhymes with the local children.

Bertrada – When one speaks the truth, Berthe, it is not bragging. N’est-ce pas? And speaking of the truth, didn’t you get the nickname of Mother Goose because you gave birth to a child whose head was shaped more like that of a goose?

Berthe – That is a despicable lie, an untruth. It is true that my husband and I were close blood relatives, first cousins in fact, but my child did not resemble a goose. That is one of those urbane legends.

Bertrada – You mean urban legend.

Berthe – Whatever.

me – Your Royal Highnesses, do not be upset. Everyone who has ever enjoyed Mother Goose rhymes owes you both a debt of gratitude.

Since I am privileged to interview you both at the same time, I would like to get your impressions of some of the Mother Goose rhymes that I believe to be rather harsh and sadistic. I’m thinking of “Rock-A-Bye Baby” for example.

“Rock-a-bye, baby, in the tree-top. When the wind blows, the cradle will rock.

When the bough breaks, the cradle will fall. Down will come baby, cradle and all.”

What kind of a sweet lullaby is that to croon to a baby? The child could have nightmares for the rest of its life.

Bertrada I have pondered on that very subject. In fact I rewrote it before I sang it to my sweet Charlemagne. Here is what I sang:

Rock-a-bye, Charlie, in the tree-top. When the wind blows, the cradle will rock.

If the bough breaks, the cradle will fall. But Mommy will catch Charlie, cradle and all.

Berthe – That was very clever, Bertrada. Isn’t this a coincidence? I did something of the same sort when I rewrote “Three Blind Mice” to sing to my sweet baby who passed away before his first birthday.

You remember how it goes:

“Three Blind Mice, Three Blind Mice. See how they run. See how they run. They all ran after the farmer’s wife. Who cut off their tails with a carving knife. Did you ever see such a sight in your life? As three blind mice.”

These lyrics are ridiculous as well as frightening to a small child. How could the mice run after the farmer’s wife if they were blind? And if she had cut off their tails wouldn’t they be running from her instead of after her? And why even mention blindness to an innocent babe?

So this is my version: “Three Fine Mice, Three Fine Mice. See how they run. See how they run. They all ran after the farmer’s wife. Who sliced up some cheese with her carving knife. Did you ever see such a sight in your life. As three fine mice.”

Mother Goose Books

Kermit, the Muppets and the Old Woman in the Shoe

meYou are both so imaginative. Thank you for sharing your revised rhymes. I have a few updated Mother Goose rhymes of my own to add. Do you remember this one?

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children, she didn't know what to do;
She gave them some broth without any bread,
She whipped them all soundly, and put them to bed.

Now what kind of a mother is that? Because she is overwhelmed and distraught, she deprives her children of the whole grains they need to grow, whips them and puts them to bed. I prefer my version:

The Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe

There was an old woman

Who lived in a shoe.

She had so many children

She didn't know what to do.


So she sent seven of them to college

To get education and training.

The first is a famous weatherman

Who can tell you when it is raining.


The next went to law school.

Are you now all ears?

He will get you out of jail

If it takes twenty years.


One daughter became a chef

For a spot that is trendy.

Where does she work you ask?

The restaurant called . . . Wendy's.


The oldest is in real estate,

Is there a bridge you'd like to buy?

Oh, wait a moment -

He sold the Brooklyn Bridge

To another guy.


Another son is a doctor,

With a practice that is new.

If you are at death's door,

He will pull you through.


Accounting is what one son chose.

To work he wears a tie and jacket.

How do I know what work he does?

He said he's in the numbers racket.


One son became an entrepreneur.

He started Stop and Shop you see.

Then he merged with the A&P group.

Now the new chain is called Stop&P.


What happened to the Old Woman?

Save your concern and your pity.

She is supported by all seven kids

And lives in a penthouse in the city.


Kermit, the Muppets and Jack and Jill

me – Berthe, Bertrada – your laughter and applause encourages me to share with you my version of “Jack and Jill.” You remember the original:

Jack and Jill went up the hill,
To fetch a pail of water;
Jack fell down, and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.

Was Jack taken to the hospital in time to repair his skull fracture? Was Jill critically hurt as well? Why worry little children with such a sad story? I rewrote it for grownups:

Jack and Jill

Jack and Jill went up the hill

To fetch a pail of water.

Jack ran down and then left town

When Jill said, “I’m with daughter.”

Bertrada – I’m so glad you found me to interview. And I want to add, Berthe, I apologize for my unkind remarks about your baby. Every baby is beautiful to its mother. I am sorry for your loss.

Berthe – I accept your apology and condolences. I know you were not bragging. Charlemagne was in fact a brilliant, exceptional son. (They both embrace)

me Thank you for the interview, Your Royal Highnesses. What do you say we all go to dinner at the little French café down the street – La Vie en Rose? Speaking of 'rose,' I just thought of a dandy 'grown-up' revision for "Roses are Red, Violets are Blue, Sugar is Sweet, And so are you." It goes like this:

Rose's are red . . . Violet's are blue . . . If you swim in icy water . . . Yours will be, too!

Before we say Adieu ... I would like to share with you ... the quote that keeps me sane ... By my hero, the Mark Twain: "Humor is the great thing, the saving thing. The minute it crops up, all our irritation and resentments slip away, and a sunny spirit takes their place."

Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault

Footnote: Most of the rhymes and tales included in any Mother Goose collection are thought to have originated in the distant past as folk stories told to children. If there were an actual Mother Goose, she could have been either Bertrada or Berthe.

Most historians, however, believe that the nursery rhymes and fairy tales were oral narratives passed down from generation to generation by peasant families in France.

The first book of fairy tales using the name, “Mother Goose,” was produced by Charles Perrault, a French publisher in 1697 and translated into English around 1729.

Sources:

Delamar, Gloria T. Mother Goose: From Nursery to Literature. London: Jefferson: McFarland and Company Inc., 1987

Opie, Iona and Peter. The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes. California: Oxford Press, 1959

© Copyright BJ Rakow, Ph.D. 2011, 2013 Rev. All rights reserved. Author, "Much of What You Know about Job Search Just Ain't So"

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Comments for Interview with Mother Goose 88 comments

Wrath Warbone profile image

Wrath Warbone 5 years ago from Cleveland, Ohio

That is very interesting about the history of Mother Goose. I still love a lot of those rhymes I heard as a child. I like the humor in this article a lot, as well. We all like twisting Mother Goose's verses but some of us are not as polite! lol Thanks for the trip back to childhood.


moncrieff profile image

moncrieff 5 years ago from New York, NY

Interesting. Although I was not brought up by MG rhymes, I've heard references to them in American pop culture. Great to know, thanks.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

C'est Magnifique! I always so enjoy your interviews.


Dexter Yarbrough profile image

Dexter Yarbrough 5 years ago from United States

What can I say? I just love your interviews! Voted up, up and away!


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 5 years ago from United States

This is probably one of your best interviews ever! You have such a wonderful imagination and you manage to put it into words that are just hysterical. Weaving Mother Goose rhymes that I remember so well from childhood into a bit of history is a stroke of genius.

Rated up, funny and awesome.


Paradise7 profile image

Paradise7 5 years ago from Upstate New York

Very cool hub, thank you!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 5 years ago from St. Louis, MO

Wow Drbj - I was just thinking interesting old Nursey Rhymes and stories. They were scary when I was little! Ofmcourse we loved them - this is brilliant! I loved it....votra Fracaise est excellent!

Do you remember Ring Around The Rosy? Very interesting history behind that one too.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 5 years ago from Southern Illinois

Well, You did it again!! Not only is it funny, it's interesting to learn facts about Mother Goose. My favorites, Danny Devito, Death's door, With Daughter. HaHa

YOU ROCK


lmmartin profile image

lmmartin 5 years ago from Alberta and Florida

Hats off to the Mothers Geese. But you got one wrong:

Jack and Jill went up the hill

To fetch a pail of water.

But Jill forgot to take her pill

And now they have a daughter.

Just had to add that. Rated up. Lynda

PS what is Edith Piaf doing here?


The Frog Prince profile image

The Frog Prince 5 years ago from Arlington, TX

What a Hub! 5 Stars and an Up!

The Frog


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 5 years ago from South Africa

Drbj, reading your hubs is always a pleasure. I’m in awe of your amazing talent – to expose serious misconceptions through humor. The paraphernalia you’ve added to this hub are (once again) profound and striking.

You reminded me of the rhyme: Ring-a-rosy…. Also about a horrifying event that should not be brushed aside by playful children. To be honest, most fairy tales and children’s rhymes are horrors in disguise.

I’m thrilled to know that Mother Goose was TWO queens before she became a goose.

Your devotee 4ever-and-a-day,

Martie.


Feline Prophet profile image

Feline Prophet 5 years ago from India

Are you vying to be Mother Goose too, drbj? :D


breakfastpop profile image

breakfastpop 5 years ago

All I can say is you are amazing! I voted that way too. What a fabulous idea you have going for you.


Movie Master profile image

Movie Master 5 years ago from United Kingdom

Hi drbj, your hub got me thinking about some of those really scary nursery rhymes, 'rock a bye baby' was more like a horror story! Great interview, brilliant and voting up.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, Wrath. Me, too. I learned so much about Mother Goose history that I never knew before. And because we learn these rhymes when we're so young, they are often difficult to forget.

Thank you for 'liking my humor.' The trip back to childhood is on me.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Happy you found these Mother Goose rhymes interesting, moncrieff. I know that many folks like yourself may not have heard these tales as chilren but find many references to them as you grow up. And no thanks are necessary, it was entirely my pleasure.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

'C'est magnifique' backatcha, Susan. Thank you not only for stopping by but for enjoying my interviews. Nice to have you here.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, Dex, for loving my interviews and voting up, up and away! Wouldn't that be a great title for a song? Wait a minute, I think it already was.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Wow, Pamela - 'wonderful imagination and hysterical words' all in one sentence. What lovely fulsome praise! And oh, yes, 'stroke of genius.' I am partial to that one. It's ironic that you mentioned this was one of my best interviews because I almost didn't publish it. I did the research but then had to figure out how to make the hub even more interesting. Fortunately, I had an 'aha' moment to add revised rhymes. Thank you m'dear for the up, funny and awesome.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, Paradise, for the 'very cool' appellation. And thanks for the visit and cool comment.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

So you were thinking about old nursery rhymes, too, Kelly? What is it they say about great minds? These stories were scary when we were small but not frightening since we knew they were make-believe. Except for ogres, of course. They lived in the closet.

Thanks for the 'French' compliment - I often mix my francaise phrases with espanol explanations.

Yes, I do know the interesting history behind 'Ring around the Rosy.' If I decide to do more rhyme revisions, I'll incude that one, too.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, Ruby, for the gracious comments. Delighted I tickled your funnybone with Devito, the door of Death and my revised Jack and Jill. I would admit to laughing insanely while typing those 'bon mots' but then I would have to go back to the institution.

What a coincidence, m'luv, that you said, 'YOU ROCK.' Rocky was the name of my late husband but most folks just called him Rock.


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 5 years ago from St. Louis, MO

I love the old rhymes and I was thinking about how my kids haven't ever heard a lot of them. Of course, I lived with my college aged uncle too and he loved to tell us scary stories too. Like, Bloody Bones and Butcherknives! LOL we loved it and would beg for more.

I love the way you weave the French in. It really makes it lots of fun too! Also got a chuckle about you cleverly correcting yourself:)


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

I like your 'Jill' rhyme, Lynda, very creative. Thank you for the visit and the 'up.' I included Edith Piaf because I admire her tenacity to become a singer, her plaintive voice, and love that song. And 'La Vie en Rose" was the name of the imaginary cafe where we had our tete-a-tete-a-tete.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Hey, Frog, '5 Stars and an Up!' - what more could I ask? Thank you and a Ribit to you and yours.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Oh, Martie, you always say the nicest things. Utterly true, of course. (Written while evincing expression of humility.) I'm delighted that you find reading my hubs pleasurable and will attempt to maintain that level of gratification.

Like you, I am fond of using humor to make a point or emphasize a principle. Yes, Ring-a-rosy commemorated a terrible, horrible time in English history.

You mentioned you were thrilled to know that Mother Goose was TWO queens before she became a goose. Love that line. Reminds me - So unlike so many of today's leaders who seem to become a goose AFTER they are elected.

Stay well and happy.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Feline, my dear, Don't tell anyone else but I AM Mother Goose . . . in disguise. Also the Queen of France . . . twice . . . and, oh, oh, here they come again with those nasty meds!


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, bp, for the 'amazing' comment and your vote. I kinda like my 'fabulous idea,' and plan to follow Yogi Berra's famous quote: "When you come to the fork in the road, take it."


always exploring profile image

always exploring 5 years ago from Southern Illinois

HAHA, You do ROCK me friend and make me laugh out loud.

Cheers


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Welcome to my slightly skewed world, Movie Master - nice to meet you. You are spot on - many Mother Goose rhymes like 'Rockabye Baby' were downright frightening. Thank you for your kind comments and the up rating.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

You make a valid point, Kelly, as children we enjoy the scary tales when they are told by someone familiar who loves us. Imagine how frightening those 'bloody bones' stories could have been if told by someone with ulterior motives.

Thanks for enjoying my self-corrections - I will willingly denigrate my self (to a certain degree) for a laugh. Have an amazing weekend.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Ah, Ruby, my Hubbuddy, making you laugh out loud and ROCK you as well - that makes my day. Cheers and a 'loverly' weekend backatcha.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 5 years ago from Central Oklahoma

drbj, how clever you are! I enjoyed every moment of this "interview" but especially your version of the "The Old Woman Who Lived In A Shoe"!! Definitely a vote UP! ;D


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

I am delighted, JamaGenee, by your visit and your sublime comments. It's super that you enjoyed this Interview and even super-er that you liked my version of the Old Shoe-Woman. So did I! Thank you for the up vote, too.


akirchner profile image

akirchner 5 years ago from Central Oregon

Fascinating as always, Dr. BJ - you lead us down the path of merriment once again both to educate us on where the rhymes actually came from and then to give us a new twist to some old rhymes. To be honest, I never did like the originals on many of these as they were too frightening for kids' ears - I believe you should request them to publish a new version...YOURS~ Fantastic!


Rebecca E. profile image

Rebecca E. 5 years ago from Canada

drbj-- as always well doneand I loved evry moment of it.


saddlerider1 profile image

saddlerider1 5 years ago

Madamoiselle-cete mganifique..Vous parle Francaise tres bien. Je parle uns peu, bein pas ceurament. I knew I couldn't spell a dam word in French, but sounds good to me.

I grew up in Montreal and lived there 26 yrs of my life and spoke it then, but being a Prairie boy now going on 35 years I lost all the French for lack of use.

Oh Doc these are so funny, you are a great story teller and interview of the highest rank. It's interesting to know the history behind these riddles. I am familiar with them all, my mum use to read them to us as kids. But they are so silly and one wonders were they drinking their bathwater or just plain bad wine when they wrote these riddles.

Yet they have been passed from generation to generation and there are not to many of us baby boomers who didn't grow up with them. I always got a charge from them, a few good laughs for sure. Mother Goose has been Iconized, demonized, sodomized and baptized in so many languages. She is one proud goose, just who does she think she is Old Mother Hubbard.

Doc I admire your work, talent and just plain down to earth good sense and great fun to read you. You always manage to put a HUGE smile on this duck's face. Now go lay another golden egg of a gem please. I can't wait to read what you come up with next. he he he.


christopheranton profile image

christopheranton 5 years ago from Gillingham Kent. United Kingdom

You always do brilliant hubs. But this one really stands out. I would like to say which bit of it I most enjoyed, but since I loved all the parts, I cannot do that.

Thanks, and keep them coming.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 5 years ago from Central Oklahoma

Not to rain on the party here, but nursery rhymes were originally coded messages passed along as songs to warn English villagers of impending danger from the Romans and such. That's why they sound so sinister and frightening, because originally they were meant to be. But they were repeated so often and passed down from generation to generation that they became "just songs" and apparently no one thought to change the words to something less frightening to babies and children. Until, that is, YOU came along, drjb! ;D


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 5 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

The excellent Hubs continue!


fashion 5 years ago

Very interesting hub about the history of Mother Goose.

Great interview.

Thanks


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

You are always a very welcome visitor to my hubs, Audrey. Thank you for your considered and considerate comments.

I fervently agree with you. Many of the nurseruy rhymes based on English history in the 17th century were much too frightening to sing to small chilren. I believe the earlier original French tales were more reasonable and much less harsh.

If I ever get around to writing more new versions of Mother Goose rhymes, you know, m'luv, it will be dedicated to you. And thanks for the 'Fantastic!'


acaetnna profile image

acaetnna 5 years ago from Guildford

Brilliant and stunningly interesting. Thank you.


attemptedhumour profile image

attemptedhumour 5 years ago from Australia

One of my feet is bigger than the other and i'm always putting it in the wrong place. I love your rhymes, because they are well thought out and witty. Those rhymes are pretty frightening and your versions are much more suitable.

I've been called a mother and a goose, but not both at the same time.

Mark Twain was a clever guy and you are one of those gals who are continuing to harness his ideals. Love it! Cheers


ReceptionChair 5 years ago

Fantastic and unexpectedly enjoyable read. Thanks!


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, Becca, for your winsome words and your visit. I love you for 'loving every moment of it.'


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 5 years ago from Chicago

Thank you these terrific interviews. I chortled on several occasions. And this is a good and needful thing. Well done!


Green Lotus profile image

Green Lotus 5 years ago from Atlanta, GA

Hi doc - Nice to finally meet Mother Goose! You're never too old to appreciate a good fairy tale rhyme or a good interview! I couldn't help but think of Carrie from Sex in the City who refers to herself as becoming the "old woman who lived in her shoes". What a set up she had. Voted up.


vocalcoach profile image

vocalcoach 5 years ago from Nashville Tn.

Genius! Genius! Genius! Just had the best time with you and Mother Goose. You are beyond clever. I adore these "Interviews". Can't wait for the next one - so get busy! Oh...and, uh, may I be president of your fan club?

Voted up and across the board. Hugs


barbergirl28 profile image

barbergirl28 5 years ago from Hemet, Ca

Alas -- I can now figure out the true words to those Mother Goose rhymes... once again you didn't disappoint. But what about the nice version of Humpty Dumpty!


Mother Goose's Descendant 5 years ago

Pepin the Short was called that because he had short hair, unlike the kings who were his predecessors. Danny DiVito, he was not. ;-)


ar.colton profile image

ar.colton 5 years ago from Vancouver, B.C.

Love the revised rhymes and the bit of history. I wish Pepin did look like Danny Devito. It would have made history more interesting :)


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Like you, Ken, I used to know a lot more French than I do now. Guess the saying is accurate: 'Use it or lose it.' I do use a lot of positive 'Voilas' and negative 'Merdes' though. Some days, a lot more 'Merdes.'

Thank you for your gracious accolades. Being called a 'great story teller and interviewer of the highest rank,' means even more coming from you, a talented and charismatic story-teller.

I have always been fascinated by the harsh and often far from sublime words in Mother Goose rhymes so it was very interesting to learn some historical facts. In fact, I am working on a Part Two to describe how Engish history in the 17th century provided much of the background for these scary-to-children tales.

Enjoyed a good laugh from your description of Mother Goose as 'Iconized, demonized, sodomized and baptized.'

I'm delighted you enjoy my work as I enjoy reading yours, and intend to provide many more smiles, even chuckles, with these 'golden eggs' forever more. Oh, oh, I think I have been fairy tale-ized.

Have a mahvelous weekend. ;)


sheila b. profile image

sheila b. 5 years ago

What a fun read!


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, christopher, for loving all the parts of this 'brilliant' hub. Delighted with your choice of adjective.

Will do as you say and try to keep them coming . . . or is it going?


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

You could never rain on my parade, Jama. I appreciate additional information from comments on every hub I write. It's true that the nursery rhymes brought to America from England often reflected horrible happenings like wars and executions.

For this hub I chose to concentrate on who the original Mother Goose/Geese may have been. For the next one in this series, I'll provide the background for some sadistic favorites like 'Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary' and 'Ring Around the Rosy.' ;)


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, Will, for your salutory, succinct statement of sincerity. I couldn't have said it betterer.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Hello, fashion, nice to meet you. Thank you for wending your way here and finding Mother Goose and her history interesting and the interview 'great.' Come back any time.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Wow! acaetnna, what a gracious comment: "Brilliant and stunningly interesting." Thank you, thank you.

I'm curious: what does your profile name stand for? Just wonderin'.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

I guess, Keith, it's OK if one of your feet is bigger than the other as long as the wrong place you are always putting it is not your mouth.

Thanks for loving my version of the nursery rhymes. I'll see what lunacy I can think of for Part Two of Mother Goose.

I would never ever call you a 'mother' or a 'goose.' Promise. And thanks for mentioning my hero, Mark Twain, who I strive in a small way to emulate. Cheers backatcha.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Pleasure to meet you, ReceptionChair. What an occasion! This is the first time I received a comment from a piece of furniture . . . and literate at that.

It was 'fantastic and unexpectedly enjoyable' for me, too. Thank you.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

You have made my day, James. Not only because of the 'terrific interview' comment, but because you actually chortled a number of times while reading it. That is the epitome of appreciation. Actual chortling! Thank you, my learned friend.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, Hilary, thanks for reminding me of Carrie of 'Sex in the City' who referred to herself as becoming the "old woman who lived in her shoes." And very expensive high heels, to boot. Get it? Heels? Boot? Sorry - it's been a difficult week.

Thanks for the visit - I always appreciate your stopping by.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Absolutely deighted, Audrey, that you had a good time with Mother Goose/Geese.

Of course you can be the President and Chief Bottle Washer of my fan club - no charge. Now get busy on the membership which already consists of two - YOU and me.

Thank you for adoring my interviews and the three "Genius!" accolades as well as the voted up and stuff. Hugs backatcha, my beautiful Hubbuddy.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Happy to oblige you, barbergirl, with the true words to those Mother Goose rhymes. Delighted I didn't disappoint you.

Since you mentioned it, I will research Humpty Dumpty and find out how the King's horses could have gotten into the act. Will publish the results in Part Two. And dedicate it to you.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Welcome, Mother Goose's Descendent - good to meet you. Would that be from Bertrada or Berthe's side of the family?

Yes, Pepin the Short did cut his hair shorter than his predecessors but he was given that sobriquet by his citizens since he was somewhere between 5 feet and 5 foot 2. I will tell the complete story in Part Two. Stay tuned.


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drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, ar, for loving the revised rhymes and Mother Goose history. No, Pepin did not look just like Danny but he WAS height-challenged. I will provide the details in the next Goosey hub.


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drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, sheila, for finding this a 'fun read.' In case you haven't guessed, that's my favorite kind.


Hello, hello, profile image

Hello, hello, 5 years ago from London, UK

Hello, drbj, you have done another great piece bringing back all that history. It was a joy to read.


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thougtforce 5 years ago from Sweden

Even though I haven't heard of Mother Goose before I found this hub very interesting and as always brilliant! Some of the stories and rhymes you mention here have similarities with Swedish and Scandinavian stories for example; a family living in a shoe and also rhymes that are a bit cruel. I guess old stories and rhymes was supposed to be a bit scary and didn't always have a happy end.

Thanks for writing this awesome interview, I had a great time reading it!

Tina


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drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Hello, Hanna. It's so nice to have you here. I always enjoy your comments and "a joy to read" has got to be one of my favorites. Thank you.


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drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Absolutely correct, Tina. Most of the Mother Goose rhymes reflected actual people and/or events - most of which were horrible or cruel. And which occurred in the 1600s.

I am writing Part Two now which will reveal the history behind some of the most popular rhymes. Stay tuned. I'm delighted you enjoyed reading Part One.


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epigramman 5 years ago

..you're such a joy and a delight - and yes the world famoous legendary interview series - I've told everyone about you - but I must even tell more - oh well another one for the ages and let's start once again with a posting to my Bookface page with a direct link back here.

lake erie time 9:43pm ..but here at your hubspace I have all the time in the world.


CMHypno profile image

CMHypno 5 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

Well what can I say drbj, what an original hub! I didn't realise that there was so much historical information on Mother Goose and what a hilarious interview!


J. Rocco 5 years ago

Drbj, you did it again. What a fantastic and interesting hub on Mother Goose. I look forward to reading everything you write. I always learn something I did not know. Way to go Doc..

Terrific article. Thank you.

J.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

This is another funny and interesting hub, drbj! I enjoyed reading it, just like I enjoy reading all your supernatural interview hubs.


Aka Professor M 5 years ago

Like that Old Adage "Better Late than Never", I have finally had an opportunity to make the rounds and this was well worth the time and effort, drbj.

The Interview concept was handled expertly, my friend. I, for one, thoroughly enjoyed the interaction of the two interviewees, which added to the continuity of the piece.

Many of the other commentors have already stated the obvious, as to the "genius" of the format used. The Way that this hub transported them back to their childhood memories of these well known nursery rhymes.

The way that you chose to enlighten your readers as to the rhymes highlighted as in need of revision and the updated and "improved version provided by yourself.

The Brilliance of the writer has indeed shown throw as the piece itself has all the elements necessary to gather the attention of many of hubPages own luminaries.

Perhaps the use of French complete with the accompanying English subtitles (translations) gave it that added hook of decadence like a foreign film review which was the icing on the cake, drbj!

I do hereby proclaim this piece as a "Gem of Wisdom" and you, drjb, its author, as a true "Hubber of Influence!" Futhermore, It should be require reading for all who are thought of as Self-Professed, Knowledgeable and Notable Writers in the circle Known As "HUBPAGES".

Thanks for the illuminating and engaging presentation, drjb. I have Voted it Up and pushed all the buttons as They are quite applicable here!

Regards Mike ! (Aka Professor M!) ;D


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

The joy and delight is all mine, Colin, when you come to visit my hubs. "World famous," eh? For my "legendary interview series?" You do say the nicest things.

I'm delighted by your visit and that you share this link with others. You ARE the man, my man. Be happy and be well.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

I dunno, CM, for someone who asked 'what can I say,' you did a great job with 'original hub' and 'hilarious interview.' Thank you. Me, too, I had little knowledge before of the plethora (love that word) of historical information regarding the Mother Goose rhymes. Be sure to read Part Two, too.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, J. Welcome back to my corner of Hubville. Delighted you found Mother Goose 'fantastic and interesting.' I always learn something, too, when I do these inrterviews - whether with dead celebrities or weird animals. Speaking of strange animals/insects, be sure to read my latest: "Interview with Banana Spider."

Thanks for your thanks - the pleasure is all mine.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

You are my kind of follower, Alicia, someone who enjoys reading my funny supernatural interviews. Thanks for visiting, commenting and liking my ramblings.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida Author

I do agree with you, Prof. M. Arriving late is so much better than not arriving at all. Thank you for commenting on the interaction that occurs when there are more than two interviewees. I found it a challenge at first but then it just started to flow - almost beyond my control at times. Heh, heh.

It isn't difficult for those of us who have been exposed to nursery rhymes as children to relate to historical information about them and even revisions. They may be part of our 'collective unconscious.'

A hook of decadence, Prof, with the foreign language? That's an unforeseen bonus. I'll take decadence over dogma any day.

Thank you for your sublime words of approbabion and pushing all the buttons. I do appreciate your visits, Mike. And don't forget to visit Part Two.


habee profile image

habee 5 years ago from Georgia

Thanks for the smiles! Love your version of the Old Woman in the Shoe. When all the grands are here, I feel just like she did! Voted up!


Derdriu 5 years ago

drbj: Astute psychology, linguistic finesse and thorough psychology precede the writing of such a humorous, informative article as yours on Mother Goose as the source of beloved stories and as a possibly real historical figure. Your alternative versions had me rolling in the aisles. Thank you!


epigramman profile image

epigramman 4 years ago

....time to revisit a classic and re-post this beauty to our music/cinema group on Facebook: Let's just talk music or cinema - hope all is well with you - I am promoting your interview series there - lake erie time 3:18pm


drbj profile image

drbj 4 years ago from south Florida Author

I can understand, Holle, your feeling like the Old Woman who Lived in a Shoe when all your lovable grandchildren visit. You are most welcome for the smiles and thank you for the Up vote.


drbj profile image

drbj 4 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, Derdriu. What sublime language and fanciful phrasing you included in your comments: 'astute psychology and linguistic finesse' - two of my most favorite accolades.

Thank you for rolling in the aisles with my alternative versions. The pleasure was all mine, m'dear.


drbj profile image

drbj 4 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, Colin, for your persistent attendance on my hubs as well as the very gracious comments you post. And thanks also for reposting my hubs to your music/cinema group on Facebook. It is my honor to have you promote my Interview series there.

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