LESSONS LEARNED: High School is Hard

My sophomore year photo

Source

High school days for me were for the most part exciting days full of experiences of a lifetime. There is a time that stands out out today as clearly as if I were reliving it today. It was not one of the high points of my high school years.

One in particular stands out for me as the one that caused a period of my high school years to be the hardest, the most difficult of my then 15 years. I was a sophomore the year of my unfortunate experience. Now, as I write about late fall, early winter of 1963, it as is I am watching the young girl who found herself in a most untenable situation.It was a stinky situation that resulted in her being absent from school for about three weeks. To fully explain the circumstances a little history is provided.

There's a big world out there. Bigger than prom, bigger than high school, and it won't matter if you were the prom queen or the quarterback of the football team or the biggest nerd. Find out who you are and try not to be afraid of it.

— uknown

The Summer of 1963

In the summer of 1963 something totally unexpected at my house. The house I lived in had remained the same on the inside and the outside with the exception of fresh coats of paints on the inside and outside, making needed repairs, and normal general upkeep on the place.

Our home had always been heated exclusively with a coal stove that stood about 5 feet high and probably about 45 inches in diameter. That coal stove heated our home well. I have no memories of being cold except first thing in the morning in the winter. At that time the stove had not had time to heat the rooms so we would lay our clothes on the metal frame that surrounded it to get them nice and toasty before we slipped into them.

I'll remember the laughter as we go our separate ways but there's so much we're learning and we cannot be afraid. There's a world outside our door and nothing in our way. But if it's not what we're both looking for, we'll meet again someday.

— unknown

Heating and cooking

We had another cast iron stove that happily sat in our kitchen. It was used to cook special foods like fragrant slices of toast charred just to perfection and puffy, flaky biscuits. Once in a while in a large, fat cast iron pan would be filled with white beans and seasonings and set on that kitchen stove to cook for most of the day. An original slow cooker for sure, the aromas from the contents of that pot wove its way around the corners of our home into each room.

There was a third tiny potbellied stove in our washroom. The wash room was a cold room. It was shut off from the rest of the house so that none of the glorious warmth could escape from the main rooms of the house.

In the wintertime on wash days Daddy would bundle up in his winter coat and long grey work gloves and start a fire early in the morning so that after a few hours the room had heated up nicely and the chill was no longer in the air.

An end to an era

Although the coal stove had seemed adequate to me all of my first 15 years, I guess my parents decided they wanted to bring our home into the sixties. The summer of 1963 work began. Central heating was being installed in our home.

Our house sat on cinder blocks and there was a space of about 12 inches between the sod floor underneath it and the wooden frame of the building. That meant that all manner of animals would come to rest under there whenever they chose.

Work progressed on this big project. It did not take long for the old, familiar coal stove to be removed from the living room. All remnants of it were soon completely erased and it was as if it had never been there.

Was she ever mine?

The little story of the bird who was caged and was set free comes to mind. If it came back, it was mine. If it did not return to me, it was never mine at all. Perhaps my sweet little bird had shared only a few moments with me eagerly awaiting her time to be free.

A bird finds her freedom

During the construction process a tragedy did occur. I had a sweet lemon yellow pet Parakeet named Goldie. It was my job to change her cage each Saturday. When I changed the cage, I always let her fly around in the living room till I was finished. This Saturday was no exception. She was flying around enjoying her infrequent freedom while I took care of sprucing up her little cage. When it was time to return her to her now pristine cage, I could not find her. I looked and looked and called and called. I looked behind the draperies in all of the rooms as she sometimes would cozy up there I believe so she could see outside.

While I was searching frantically for her, I noticed a hole in the floor. It was a little register space with no little grate put over it ---a part of the new heating system. I know I had been told to watch where I stepped because of the danger of falling in one. But I never though about it the day I changed the cage.

I realized she must have gotten outside through the register. I ran outside to look for her and soon spied her high up in a tree. By this time my family was all out there with me trying to calm me down and to help coax her down. All day I sat out there while she flitted from branch to branch seemingly have the time of her life. Darkness came and my Daddy hung her cage as high up in the trees as far as he could get it. The next morning I raced out to see if she was there. Sadly she was not and I never saw her again. But I learned to reconcile her escape. It made me so happy to see her enjoying her freedom flying around totally unfettered.

The workers continued transforming our home from what many considered outdated, archaic heating arrangements to a more modern heating system. After all construction was completed and all of the rearranging was completed, life returned to normal.

4H Club

I am in the center  on the second row in the white sweater.
I am in the center on the second row in the white sweater. | Source

Flash back to the 60s...my high school years

Overflowing with expectation

School began in September and I was so excited. I had only two more years left after tenth grade and then I would go off to college. Being a sophomore meant being able to join new clubs and participate in new activities that I could not in ninth grade. The 4-H Club and Future Teachers of America were two of my favorites. It was going to be a year filled with many new experiences and I was so ready to tackle each new hurdle that may arise.

Each day was filled with new learning experiences both inside and outside of the classroom. I was taking my second year of French and I loved my French teacher. She made each class period fly by and learning was thrilling in her class. She was also the Mother of one of the girls in the class so that added another dimension to her personality. We attended a number of parties around the holidays at her home.

Everything was going so well. This was proving to be my favorite year in school so far. To top off everything I was very healthy. Up to this point I had had a number of surgeries on my ears and still had repeated ear infections which often caused me to miss long periods from school. This year I was feeling 100% and was filled with so much enthusiasm it was impossible to contain it.

Our 1963 yearbook

Source

Stinky Little Culprits

Source

Unwelcome visitors

This fall was different though. New interlopers came to town that year. They were black and white and had very bushy tails and they were stinky. Our new unwelcome residents under the house were skunks.

We would have never known except like the kitties they needed to establish the pecking order. It seems the skunks wanted the kitties to know that there were some new gunslingers in town and their weapons were very powerful. It was not long till the order of skunk spray permeated our house. It is an acrid and foul and most unwanted odor to have envelope your home.

The next day I was more than a bit anxious to get dressed and leave home hoping that by the time I got home the odor would have dissipated and the skunks would be gone.

A stinky encounter

About the beginning of October the temperatures dropped as they usually did around that time of the year. As usual animals found a way to huddle under our house. There were still a few spots around the perimeter of the structure that somehow the workers had not completely closed in when they installed the new heating unit.

Usually the only animals that huddled under the house were some stray kitties in the area. Their presence under there rarely resulted in any problems. Once or twice we were privy to a few authentic cat fights but once the pecking order was established there was no more scrapping going on under there.

The odor came along

I ran down the quarter mile lane to the bus. Once I was on the bus I found an open seat, sat down for a second and decided to move to one closer to the front and waited, saving a seat for my best friend. Before long I heard kids saying, “I smell a skunk.” It was strange. You could not smell the odor on me. You could smell it where I had been. It was as if I had marked my territory.

I made no comment when the kids said that and no one realized it was me.

When I got to school, I went to my locker and put my purse inside, got my books, and headed to class. When class ended, kids poured into the hallways and as they passed my locker they would say, “I smell a skunk.” I chirped in, "I do too!" Thank goodness the odor was somewhat generalized around the locker area so you could not tell it was my locker from which the piercing distinctive odor was emanating.

High school was hard for me that year especially as I was just finding my own little place in the world. It was not hard because of others but I did see some kids being mean to others to the extent of being able to call it bullying. I did not want that to happen to me.

When I went home, I told my Momma about my narrow escape from being discovered as skunk girl or some worse label. I was mortified and terrified that someone would discover my secret and I would have died a thousand deaths.

Home from school

That night there was another barrage by the skunks, marking their territory. I knew that I could not go to school again and risk being discovered. I would have been totally humiliated if anyone found out I was reeking of skunk odor.

The principal of the school lived at the end of the quarter mile road that I ran down each morning. So my Momma went to see him and explained what had happened. He told her she could keep me at home as long as it took to chase the skunks away and to rid my clothes of the odor. He brought my assignments to me each day and took my work back to school the next day.

My momma moved all of my clothes to the wash room area which was not in the part of the house where the skunks’ spray had permeated. However by the time they were removed they all smelled of skunk.

There was an old tale that washing in tomato juice would remove the odor but it did not work and there were some things that could not be washed like my long wool winter coats.

So all of my clothes were sent to the dry cleaners. When they came home, they were all hung in the wash room area to keep any skunk odor from getting on them.

Lessons learned

The first thing that was done to our was house was to completely close in any openings that still remained open so animals could crawl under the house. The next thing that happened was that Daddy set crab pots around the place with food inside. The skunks were trapped and he drove them to a forested area several miles away to release them. It was a long difficult task but after about two and one half weeks for all of them to be caught and removed.

By the end of the that period of time, our home was back to its normal lovely smell. I was able to return to school. My friends all wanted to know why I had been out of school and I lied. I could not tell the truth. It was too painful. I really do not remember exactly what I said but I imagine I muttered something about being sick which would not have been unusual for me.

High school remained hard for me because I was a worrier at the time. I worried that I would not fit in somehow. Most of my friends came from moneyed families. My family was one of meager means and while no one would really guess that we were not well off, I knew. And in hindsight, I guess I was a bit envious of my friends. Yes, the green-eyed monster game to town. All of my friends had the name brand clothes, shoes, and stereo systems. When they got their driving license at age 15, they got cars.

As I write this I see what a foolish child I was. I was the child of loving parents who doted on me. And they gave me all that could in a financial sense but far more than many received in love and emotional support. I was so blessed to be the child of parents who loved and cherished me.

Lessons learned: life is hard, God is good.

High school is as hard as we make it. Sometimes. Sometimes there are contributing factors to make it hard but often it is our own doing that makes it hard. Such was the case for me.

A New Awareness

The year I had anticipated with such excitement became a year that a new awareness of this complex world that I would enter soon. It was the year that I became more of woman and less of a little girl.

“When we are children we seldom think of the future. This innocence leaves us free to enjoy ourselves as few adults can. The day we fret about the future is the day we leave our childhood behind.”
―Patrick Rothfuss

Life is hard but God is good...

It was a few weeks after my own personal fiasco that our nation lost a leader and caused our country ito be swallowed up in a period of mourning. The death of a President touched the lives of all. It did not matter if you had voted for him or not, he was the President and he had fallen.

I was sitting in my Latin class when the announcement came over the loudspeaker telling us that President Kennedy had been shot and that he had died. An extremely unsettling feeling fell over the class. No one spoke. Our lives were so unfettered with worry and violence that this announcement was almost too much to understand. We left school that day having lost much of our innocence. Awareness of the world outside of our small town, our high school days, did exist and came crashing into our gentle way of life.

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Comments 31 comments

pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Good morning FlourishAnway

High School was a time of challenges for sure. But it was also a time of growing up and learning to be the best me.

And thankfully I had a supportive family who helped me keep my head on straight.

Nice to see you this morning.

Angels are on the way :) ps


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Good morning FlourishAnway

High School was a time of challenges for sure. But it was also a time of growing up and learning to be the best me.

And thankfully I had a supportive family who helped me keep my head on straight.

Nice to see you this morning.

Angels are on the way :) ps


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

Touching story. High school is such a tumultuous time for many. Reasons vary, but I truly enjoyed reading your account. Voted up and beautiful.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Dream on....I can tell you have a lovely, loving family. And you ask how can you be so blessed. I have felt the same all of my life. I had the two most amazing parents who loved me so and surrounded me with a safety net that any time I felt angst of any kind they quickly erased it for me. I continue to this day to be thankful for the way the nurutured me.

The death of Pres. Kennedy was an intrusion into the quiet calm world in which I lived, in which we all lived. I will always remember it and the days that followed and the subsquent events that unfolded before our eyes on television. Our tv was usually off but during this time it was on all the time.

Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts and comments with me. I grow every time I read a comment that comes from the heart.

Sending Angels to you and yours. :) ps


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Dream on....I can tell you have a lovely, loving family. And you ask how can you be so blessed. I have felt the same all of my life. I had the two most amazing parents who loved me so and surrounded me with a safety net that any time I felt angst of any kind they quickly erased it for me. I continue to this day to be thankful for the way the nurutured me.

The death of Pres. Kennedy was an intrusion into the quiet calm world in which I lived, in which we all lived. I will always remember it and the days that followed and the subsquent events that unfolded before our eyes on television. Our tv was usually off but during this time it was on all the time.

Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts and comments with me. I grow every time I read a comment that comes from the heart.

Sending Angels to you and yours. :) ps


DREAM ON profile image

DREAM ON 3 years ago

I wasn't born till 1964 but all through the years I have heard about the day President Kennedy was shot.So many just talk about the actual shooting and never their mindset and their life at that time.Your writings are wonderful and a combination of historical and hysterical.I can imagine every step of the way.So vivid and clear.So nice of you to share.I learn so much from people who have lived with trauma,fear,depression.My life has always been one of safety and freedom.Thanks to my mother and father who went through many hardships and made sure they provided the two most important things in my life.Love that was stronger than anything I have ever known.A home that was always safe and I never went hungry.Many times I feel that it was not right that so many have suffered during their life and I had no problems at all.Why should I be so blessed.Other people disserve a life of love and endless opportunity and peace that will lead us all to better days.I some how knew what ever happpended in my life never could it be bad because I had I wonderful mom and dad and brothers I could feel safe.God Bless and may each day be more wonderful than the next.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Good evening Alocsin

Yes, it was hard. But thank goodness all of these years later we can look back and say, we survived. We faced the challenges and made it through and some of the lessons learned have probably made us better equipped to handle what we handle today. Thank you for stopping by and am sending Angels your way.

:) ps


alocsin profile image

alocsin 3 years ago from Orange County, CA

I went to high school about 10 years later and can tell you that it wasn't easier. That period is just so hard for everybody because of all the strange changes we're undergoing. Voting this Up and Interesting.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Hi midget...

You are right. I wish I had not been so disturbed by what I thought others would say. But I was and I remained with that albatross around my neck for many years after that. One day I realized that life is too short to carry such baggage and I let go of it. And after that I did not look back. When I made a decision, I learned to live with the consequences.

Thank you for stopping by. Sending Angels to you and your family :) ps


midget38 profile image

midget38 3 years ago from Singapore

Life is really unpredictable. I paused several times to think about this as I was reading.....and another thing I realized was how people judge each other over the smallest of things....I can imagine how uncomfortable the situation was for you then. We really should learn to overlook the trivial and appreciate people for what they truly are! I enjoyed this article, VUMS!


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Thanks for you for your comment, Glimmer Twin Fan.

High school was hard for me because of the pressure I put on myself. I learned much later that what I worried about usually never happened and that worrying changed nothing.

College was where I blossomed too ....thank goodness for that. Sending Angels to you and yours :) ps


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Thanks for you for your comment, Glimmer Twin Fan.

High school was hard for me because of the pressure I put on myself. I learned much later that what I worried about usually never happened and that worrying changed nothing.

College was where I blossomed too ....thank goodness for that. Sending Angels to you and yours :) ps


Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

Glimmer Twin Fan 3 years ago

What a wonderful hub. High school was tough for me. I really found myself in college. Your opening quote is absolutely spot on and I love it. Thanks for a great read.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Lovely reply, Patricia. In fact, all the comments here on your thread are really good. Thank you for sharing.

So you were born when I was graduating from high school! I was born Feb. 2, 1932. My 81st is just around the corner! Hard for me to believe!

I'd earned the credits to graduate HS at midterm when I was still 15, but my parents thought it best that I graduate with the class in June, which I believe was wise. I'd started school almost 2 years younger than normal, so was already out of age-step with my classmates, plus being so much younger than siblings, 10-12-&-14 years my seniors, and with older parents, who were 40 and 42 when I was born. I grew up in a world of articulate giants, which surely contributed to the slight limbo I constantly felt as I was trying to know who I really was, not quite 'fitting' roles assigned but not having found the one that fit or the 'voice' to declare or question it. It would be quite awhile before I got it together, really -- at age 40, actually! My siblings never did realize it, but my parents saw it! They both passed on in mid 1970s, about the time I was coming forth from my cocoon. haha. When I married my beloved George at age 53, Ruth beseeched him to not make an adult of me! Subjective perception rules, doesn't it? :-)

I seldom really look at anything as being intrinsically 'hard', though. I'm naturally what I term an optimistic realist & a realistic optimist, of the mind that if something is amiss in 'life', it can be fixed or improved; & that process should start with analyzing the situation to see what part I played in getting it amiss & to remedying that; lessons learned with both anguish & enlightenment. I noticed that 'it' hadn't just happened; that I'd made choices & was responsible for the outcome, 18 years later. That realization empowered me to arise to the outcome.

God's goodness is not in question; life is neutral. But life's can become hard, because it responds to our input & consequences of that. So it can be about as good as we coax & help it to be, which can involve self-examination that is hard. But if we find ourselves experiencing hard consequences, it's our cue that we ought to change whatever we do or did to set them off on that course.

Seems almost obvious that is the lesson & is part of the purpose for our being 'in it'. Ultimately, my faith is that "there is no problem", because God IS good. Meantime we've our life to do, keeping up our 'end' here in life, because it's the best choice available.

I really enjoy hearing about your life and background. I'll bet you're a wonderful teacher! Your growing up obviously fitted you for a good and effective life!


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Good morning Nellieanna. How interesting that is. was born in 1948 and here we are exchanging what has impacted our lives. My Father was in WWI and WWII so I heard about the wars but it seemed unreal to me somehow as my life was never really touched by it. I was blessed. But he taught me to love and care for this nation with any flaws that it has. He would not be surprised by the way the nation is trying to be reborn these years since his death in 1987 at the age of 93. Throughout history nations have gone a rebirth and many times for the better. Change is often painful and confusing but sometimes good things come out of it. One thing is certain: we must all be more aware and pay attention to what is happening and let our voices be heard.

Life is hard but God is good remains a significant mantra.

So glad to see you stopping by....sending Angels your way :) ps


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

It's always interesting and fun to read about someone's experiences 'back when' and think what was happening in one's own life at that time. I graduated High School in 1948, at 16. That was a good year but others of my junior and senior high school years were less good. Though I had an ability to adapt and 'ride with the punches', still, it was a time of trying to find myself & sort out 'things', but happening in what seemed like 'limbo mode'.

By the time you were experiencing the realities of the world when President Kennedy was assassinated, I was married, had two children in school, lived in Southern Indiana, far from my Texas home where the tragedy occurred. It was almost time for my children to arrive home from school off the bus. I was ironing and watching TV when programming switched to Walter Cronkite and the first notification of what had happened. He was even not sure of the details, but it was such an amazingly earth-shaking moment. I felt a special pang, since it happened in Dallas, where I'd finished college 10 years earlier - and where I've now lived for the past 40 years. It somehow seemed to be 'right at my front door'.

An earlier experience which is as deeply etched in my memory, though, was when I was in grade school in my hometown of Del Rio, Texas. We didn't have a radio at home so I hadn't heard the first news on Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, about Pearl Harbor. But the next day at school, I was in music class when the 'loud speaker' interrupted and the school principal came on, saying that we were to hear a radio broadcast by President Franklin Roosevelt announcing that my country was responding to the bombing by his declaring war on Japan. I heard him utter the famous words "a day of infamy".

We'd soon be getting fully into the World War in progress, both with Japan and in Europe. My world was transformed. My older siblings would be involved, with my brother and brother -in-law going into service, and my older sisters' lives changed. Everything at school changed - the 'war effort' left no stones unturned. At home, rationing changed our way of life. Well, it just became a transformed world. I've written some here about its effects, during and following the war, in my "Magnolia" series. Observing it as a kid with much older siblings gave me, I think, a unique perspective from which to store up impressions. As you say, Patricia - innocence can be lost in a split second of realization that life, which may have seemed safe and secure - - is insecure by its very nature. We must base our joy of living on its nature, rather than what is is not. For a kid, that's surely the most difficult of realizations, and one many folks never quite master.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

LifeisLovely...Love this name...life is lovely indeed...and I have done the same thing...judged a hub by the title then reconsidered and gone back and enjoyed it. I thank you for giving it a second glance. I will be over to visit soon. Sending Angels your way...:) ps


LifeisLovely profile image

LifeisLovely 4 years ago from Clearwater, Florida

I had passed this hub a couple of times thinking I wouldn't enjoy it. Much to my surprise it was great well written story. Thanks for sharing.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Hi Eddy

Thank you for stopping by. I had no idea before I wrote it how much it would revise the feelings I had when it happened. All things work together though and it turned out well.

So glad to see you today...just getting on now..have been out shopping for Christmas gifts today. :) ps


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

I so enjoyed this one; thank you so much for sharing and enjoy your day.

Eddy.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Hi MHatter

That is good news. I am glad it turned out well for you..life has a way of equalizing things for us thank goodness. Most of my high school years were filled with questioning and wondering and trying to make sense of things. My college years on the other hand were glorious years of becoming me.

So glad to see you stopped by...I will be visiting you soon. Sending Angels your way, MH, :) ps


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Hi MHatter

That is good news. I am glad it turned out well for you..life has a way of equalizing things for us thank goodness. Most of my high school years were filled with questioning and wondering and trying to make sense of things. My college years on the other hand were glorious years of becoming me.

So glad to see you stopped by...I will be visiting you soon. Sending Angels your way, MH, :) ps


Mhatter99 profile image

Mhatter99 4 years ago from San Francisco

Thank you for sharing. High school was an escape for me. By the time I graduated in 69, I was living with a teacher, who took me in.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

thank you so much for your vote....I think when I write about those moments that really tested me I am able to put it out there so others can experience it. At least that is my intent. So glad to see you stopping by today....sending Angels your way :) ps


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Yes, the principal was awesome. He was a compassionate and fair person who really cared about the welfare of his students. The high school years were filled with angst and euphoria as strange as that may seem. Thank you for stopping by, shiningirisheyes. Sending angels your way :) ps


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

I am glad you found a way around the troubles of high school, Bill ...look at you now...they can't keep a good man down!!! Thank you for your kind words too....I am always delighted when you stop by as I am sure you are busy keeping up with your own commenting. I hope all is good in your neck of the woods...sending Angels your way :) ps


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Thanks Debbie. I am humbled by your comment. This was a time in my life when so much unexpected happened and I was not ready for any of it. But it made me stronger and wiser and for that I am thankful. I learned to go forth and be the real me. Thank you so much for stopping by. ps Sending Angels your way :)


drbj profile image

drbj 4 years ago from south Florida

Your recap of your sophomore high school year in '63 is exceedingly well-written, ps. I felt your pain at both the skunk incident and JFK's death. Your point that life can be hard is well taken. Voted up, m'dear.


Deborah Brooks profile image

Deborah Brooks 4 years ago from Brownsville,TX

this hub has to be one of the best I have read in a long time.. I was 13 ... my father was stationed in Germany when it happened. I remember it like it just yesterday.. I was in the movies watching Dr. Zhivago at the time.. they interrupted the movie and told us to go home.. it was so sad.. I can relate to you.. your life the time of the 60's..

Merry Christmas to you

sharing and pinning

Debbie


shiningirisheyes profile image

shiningirisheyes 4 years ago from Upstate, New York

Such a telling tale of teenage age worries yet you were so fortunate to have an understanding principle. My high school years are best left right where they are. But mine was not marked by such a tragic occasion such as yours with President Kennedy.

Thank you for sharing this part of your younger years. Voting up


billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

I love these looks back into your life that you provide for us. High school was hard on me, but I grew up a lot during that time, and learned to stand on my own two feet despite it all. Kennedy's assassination...I was in math class when the announcement was made...horrible feelings.

I was so glad to move on to college and away from the troubling times of high school. Only baseball saved me as it gave me acceptance from the other students.

Great read PS!

blessings always,

bill

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