34 Macrophotography / Microphotography of Spiders; 34 Macrophotographic Images plus Videos of Spiders

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Macrophotography of spiders allows us to view details about spiders that we would not normally see; and for some people like me, views that we don't necessarily want to see.

Spiders have long fascinated me and repelled me all at the same time. I have had a long love hate relationship with spiders.

I am fascinated by their ability to build webs, and how quickly they are able to wrap up a prey. At the same time, I abhor walking into a web especially in the dark! I find them fascinating to watch as they go about their daily lives as long as it is at a time and place of my choosing. Heaven forbid that a spider should surprise me - I don't like those kind of surprises! And I don't like how far some of them can jump, especially when jumping toward me!


I am told that the spider above is a Peacock Spider, and was provided this video to share concerning their mating behavior. This video shows some fascinating footage of spiders performing an amazing courtship dance. I have never seen anything like this before.


Click thumbnail to view full-size
On the right side (top) of the spiders head the location of the 4th set of eyes can be seen. This spider has some of the fur rubbed off of the top of its head.This spider looks interesting with a head that appears to be square in shape and the little furs that are covering its body so up well against the contrasting color.This spider has some very vibrant colors; even the legs are faintly striped with several different colors.The delicate nature of this spiders legs has an eery appearance when viewed through  the use of macrophotography making the minute hairs visible.An atypical stance for a spider, as viewed from the side.This spider has an interesting pattern on its body in the shape of a cross. The cross is flanked by two dimples which are normally invisible to the naked eye.
On the right side (top) of the spiders head the location of the 4th set of eyes can be seen. This spider has some of the fur rubbed off of the top of its head.
On the right side (top) of the spiders head the location of the 4th set of eyes can be seen. This spider has some of the fur rubbed off of the top of its head. | Source
This spider looks interesting with a head that appears to be square in shape and the little furs that are covering its body so up well against the contrasting color.
This spider looks interesting with a head that appears to be square in shape and the little furs that are covering its body so up well against the contrasting color. | Source
This spider has some very vibrant colors; even the legs are faintly striped with several different colors.
This spider has some very vibrant colors; even the legs are faintly striped with several different colors. | Source
The delicate nature of this spiders legs has an eery appearance when viewed through  the use of macrophotography making the minute hairs visible.
The delicate nature of this spiders legs has an eery appearance when viewed through the use of macrophotography making the minute hairs visible. | Source
An atypical stance for a spider, as viewed from the side.
An atypical stance for a spider, as viewed from the side. | Source
This spider has an interesting pattern on its body in the shape of a cross. The cross is flanked by two dimples which are normally invisible to the naked eye.
This spider has an interesting pattern on its body in the shape of a cross. The cross is flanked by two dimples which are normally invisible to the naked eye. | Source

Macrophotography brings the small details into focus. We are able to see their eyes, even the very small ones. We can see the segments in their legs, and their invasive mouth parts.

We are able to see that many spiders are very hairy, while others only have a few spikes of hair on their legs.

Macrophotography opens up the world of spiders to us in a way that is exciting, while at the same time sending chills through someone who has a strong dislike for these eight-legged creatures.


Insects have large compound (faceted) eyes. Spiders, on the other hand, have simple eyes - generally 8 of them.


In the picture below, you are able to see the two main eyes of the spider, and a secondary pair also. The fur on its legs is striped.

The spider in the middle picture is on its web. On the part of the web that the spider has woven a pattern into, notice how many strands of web were used. Macrophotography makes it easy to see that many strands were used, not necessarily one larger strand.


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In the grouping of spiders below, look at the different kinds of fur or hair a spider has, and the locations that it occurs on. Even some spiders that have a furry down on them, can have some of the longer coarser hair coming through those areas, especially on the legs.

Look at the different sizes and locations of eyes.


Click thumbnail to view full-size
Jumping Spider: This spider has layers of color that is made more apparent in the head-on view.SpiderSpiderMeal Time!This spider has several different hair/fur types and piercing green eyes.This spider has vertical stripes down its legs.
Jumping Spider: This spider has layers of color that is made more apparent in the head-on view.
Jumping Spider: This spider has layers of color that is made more apparent in the head-on view. | Source
Spider
Spider | Source
Spider
Spider | Source
Meal Time!
Meal Time! | Source
This spider has several different hair/fur types and piercing green eyes.
This spider has several different hair/fur types and piercing green eyes. | Source
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This spider has vertical stripes down its legs.
This spider has vertical stripes down its legs. | Source
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This video, made by National Geographic, shows a spider stalking a bee. It contains some awesome macrophotography that is so detailed you are able to see the venom coming from the bees stinger. It's also interesting to see that when the spider jumps from one flower to another, it is doing so while casting out a web-line at the same time.


The vinegaroon is large whip-scorpion that lives in Mexico and the southern United States. It received its name from the fact that it emits a vinegary mist when startled.

The vinegaroon is an arachnid and is related to spiders.

The view of the vinegaroon below, shows the tail in all of its segmented and hairy glory. The segments of the body are also clearly displayed. The site that is referenced below, that shows a vinegaroon feeding, does a great job of showing how the body changes when it has eaten and is plump. Comparing this picture, with one of the pictures on the other site is very enlightening.

Vinegarroon. They are often called uropygids in the scientific community after the former order Uropygi. They are also known as whip scorpions because of their resemblance to true scorpions and because of their whiplike tails.”
Vinegarroon. They are often called uropygids in the scientific community after the former order Uropygi. They are also known as whip scorpions because of their resemblance to true scorpions and because of their whiplike tails.” | Source
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Through the use of macrophotography, the claws of the vinegaroon are clearly displayed in the image above.

To see an interesting narrative and pictures of a vinegaroon eating a worm, click here. This site has excellent photos of the vinegaroon. The photos on that site show what the vinegaroon looks like from the top, and shows the two colors of the vinegaroon.


Another interesting batch of spiders below. Be sure to notice the dimpling on the orb weaver. And on the translucent green spider, next to last, you can see all eight of its eyes.


Click thumbnail to view full-size
The way this spider holds its legs gives it a predatory appearance.White Crab Spider Eating Bee - Notice the dimples.White Crab SpiderOrb WeaverThe colors on this spider are quite striking, especially the yellow. The yellow on the body gives it an almost skeletal appearance (like ribs).SpiderAlthough they are very small, it is easy to see the 8 eyes on this spider.
The way this spider holds its legs gives it a predatory appearance.
The way this spider holds its legs gives it a predatory appearance. | Source
White Crab Spider Eating Bee - Notice the dimples.
White Crab Spider Eating Bee - Notice the dimples. | Source
White Crab Spider
White Crab Spider | Source
Orb Weaver
Orb Weaver | Source
The colors on this spider are quite striking, especially the yellow. The yellow on the body gives it an almost skeletal appearance (like ribs).
The colors on this spider are quite striking, especially the yellow. The yellow on the body gives it an almost skeletal appearance (like ribs). | Source
Spider
Spider | Source
Although they are very small, it is easy to see the 8 eyes on this spider.
Although they are very small, it is easy to see the 8 eyes on this spider. | Source
Source
Lynx Spider on Rose
Lynx Spider on Rose | Source

Through the macrophotography of spiders, we are able to crawl into the world of spiders without the fear that many people have toward these eight-legged creatures. For many people, including myself, I am able to view the intricate detail and fascinating features of these creatures in a way that I would not be able to tolerate in real life. I hope you have enjoyed the tangled web that I have woven to bring the world of the spider to you - up close and personal.


I hope you have enjoyed this journey through macrophotography and will join me again on one of the other hubs about macrophotography:



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Comments: "34 Macrophotography / Microphotography of Spiders; 34 Macrophotographic Images plus Videos of Spiders" 39 comments

Rising Caren profile image

Rising Caren 5 years ago from New York

I went "whoa" when I saw these pictures and my hubby went all "what are you looking at" and he tried to look at my computer screen, so I pulled it away and he starting saying "looking at guys?"

To which I replied "if you want to look, you can, but I don't think it's a good idea because of your arachnophobia".

To think he's scared of spiders, but not me.

Also, that vinegaroon really looks like a scorpion! I almost considered showing it to hubby since he's not scared of scorpions.


5 years ago

Well produced hub; voted up.

But I don't like spiders. Ugh! (smile)


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

HSB: The first picture is peacock jumping spider and they are truly amazing to watch. Great hub... the vinegar spider from Mexico is awesome too.


zzron profile image

zzron 5 years ago from Houston, TX.

Pretty scary stuff. LOL.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Rising Caren - you might want to check out the video I added about the peacock spider and its mating display. Totally awesome. I would not have ever thought a spider did what is shown so clearly in this video.

I'm glad you enjoyed the hub. It definitely might not be a good idea to show it to him, but I like the fact that I can look at them this way without having to worry about coming into contact with them.

So pleased to see you here, and thanks for sharing your thoughts with me.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - thanks about the heads up on that video, and yes I did have to add it. That courtship dance is really quite amazing. I have never seen a spider exhibit such behavior. It almost reminded me of a geisha girl waving a fan. Awesome.

Thanks for stopping by and for the share.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - thanks for the votes and for the compliment. I'm not terribly fond of spiders myself, but I managed to overcome it for a short period of time.

I have added a video that you might want to watch.

Thanks for stopping by and for commenting.


5 years ago

Wow, jumping spiders! These creatures sure know how to move!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Thanks, zzron! Pleased that you enjoyed it and came by for a visit.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - yes they certainly have the moves, especially when it comes to courting!

thanks!


5 years ago

Re. your comment: Yes, and not just spiders, either ...

Blessings.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - yes, that is quite true - I just never knew spiders went to so much trouble.


Hyphenbird profile image

Hyphenbird 5 years ago from America-Broken But Still Beautiful

These photographs are amazing. Spiders are too. They work so hard and are so complex. Thanks Homestead for a great look at them.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Hyphenbird - I am pleased that you enjoyed this hub. Spiders really are amazing, that is, as long as I can do it on my terms. Otherwise...

Tanks for taking the time to read and comment.


5 years ago

Amazing is the word, which brings a whole range of qualifiers: from amazingly photogenic, to amazingly ... ugh! (smile).

(PS: Did you get the impression I don't like spiders?)

Blessings.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - I'm with you. I am not crazy about spiders unless I get to pick the time, place and distance. Macrophotography makes it easy!

Thanks for stopping by!


5 years ago

I know what you mean; it's just that with the macrophotography it seems as if the spiders are at the tip of our noses ... (ugh)!

Blessings.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - yes but they are really interesting to look at knowing they aren't going to jump at me. But the macrophotography does take some of their more repulsive features and make them even scarier, don't they!?!


5 years ago

Oh, scary, yes. But maybe the wide diffusion of such photos will cause a revival in insect jewelry. Just as the archeological excavations in Egypt caused a rise in Art Deco style jewelry in the 1920s and 30s, like with scarab beetle brooches, etc. What do you think?

Blessings.


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

f: Don't fret over the closeness of the spiders... a jumping spider can jump more then 40 inches.... so you don't have to really close to get one on you. Then you have the hunters who crawl on the ground at night and up in your bed while you sleep, or wherever. The spiders that are most feared, black widow, and brown recluse are actually pretty sedentary. They don't roam, they don't creep around too much. They sit and wait for food. Most people who are bitten by either spider are bitten because they stuck their foot in a shoe that they did not check first or their and in a glove. Sometimes the bit comes when we put on clothes we have not worn for a long time and they have nested in there. A good rule of thumb is to check first. The thing about spiders is that none of them WANT to be on you. If they knew they were on you they would get right off. the problem is that we are so big they don't really see us as people. Spiders very rarely bite unless provoked or we hurt them. HSB: I may be getting a tarantula as a pet.... yay!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - you never know, it could happen.

davenmidtown - 40 inches!!!! I did not need to know that! That's the thing that nightmares are made of - my nightmares are often about spiders. And the hunter ... thanks a lot! You can have your tarantula. I like to observe them, just followed one across the street a few weeks ago. Watched an amazing youtube video of one carrying a coral snake after it had killed it. But want one for a pet - I think not. I'll stick with the dogs and cats. I want a sugar glider, but hubby says no.


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

HSB: Just to be clear... 40 inches is more then a yard and the jumping spiders rarely get larger then a nickle...They also jump from their knees and not their ankles which allows them to really launch themselves. Fleas use the same method of hopping and jumping. My neighbor has a tarantula he is quite beautiful. I should send you one of his casings. They shed their whole exoskeleton... fangs and all. If I can find a baby tarantula... I will get one. I want to be able to hold it.


brittanytodd profile image

brittanytodd 5 years ago from Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

Wow! I never heard of a peacock spider before. Thanks for sharing another excellent and engaging hub. Voted up, etc.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - you were more than clear the first time. I know that 40" is over a yard, and that is way too far for me.

Good luck on the tarantula. And I won't be needing the skin either. Thanks but no thanks.


5 years ago

Good explanation, but: ... ugh (!)


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - I'm with you... ugh!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

brittanytodd - Hello, good to see you again! I am going to try to make it to the 30 in 30 forum, but I'm trying to get a hub completed. See you there.

Thanks for stopping by.


hazelwood4 profile image

hazelwood4 5 years ago from Owensboro, Kentucky

Oh, my, my, my this is an awesome Hub. It is amazing how intricate spiders are! They are truly amazing creatures of God for sure! Weird and creepy! But are so so amazing! Great share! Thumbs up!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

hazelwood4 - I am pleased that you enjoyed this hub. I personally like some of the other macros better, but spiders are fascinating also, so I could not leave them out. Thanks for stopping by and for commenting.


hazelwood4 profile image

hazelwood4 5 years ago from Owensboro, Kentucky

I noticed you had some other macrophotography Hubs posted too. I will check those out later on today. Spiders, are fascinating for sure.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

hazelwood4 - thanks for stopping back by. Yest I have a few others I have created, and I have several more that I am working on. Thanks for stopping by and I will see you again someplace in the world of macrophotography!


fidencio1 profile image

fidencio1 5 years ago from Louisiana

These, as are all of your photos, are awesome. Great detail.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

fidencio1 - I am glad that you enjoyed them. I wish I could take credit for the photos I cannot. I just had to look long and hard through flickr to find the one I wanted to use to show my subject.

Thanks for stopping by and for commenting.


fidencio1 profile image

fidencio1 5 years ago from Louisiana

It still took effort. Great job.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

fidencio1 - thank you so much. That was so sweet!

Thanks!


Chasing Riley profile image

Chasing Riley 5 years ago from Los Angeles

This is a really cool hub. I love the layout, the amazing photos, the information on macrophotography and the amazing detail you went in to. That being said, I don't ever think I've read a hub that fast. My heart rate is definitely up. No spiders for me :) For you...voted up and interesting!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Chasing Riley - I had a hard time writing this one. I kept feeling like something was crawling on me while working on it. So I understand entirely where you are coming from. I get you would enjoy the flowers though. You might give that one a try.

Thanks for taking the time to stop by and read. Thanks for the votes.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

This was fascinating although I will admit that I would rather have no spiders in the house...rather outside where they belong. 8 eyes! No wonder the jumping spiders are hard to catch if they get inside the house. No sneaking up on them...that's for sure! Up, useful and interesting votes.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 4 years ago from Texas Author

Peggy W - I'm with you. They can be fascinating, but in their place. I'm pleased that you enjoyed this.

Thanks for stopping by!

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