64 Macrophotography / Microphotography of Flying Insects or Bugs ~ Images of Flying Insects or Bugs

Iridescent wings are displayed beautifully and contrast well against the black of the insect's body. The texture of the wings of this particular insect is very unusual.
Iridescent wings are displayed beautifully and contrast well against the black of the insect's body. The texture of the wings of this particular insect is very unusual. | Source
Source
Source
Mayfly
Mayfly | Source


Through the macrophotography of flying insects, we will be soaring to new heights and observing some of our winged friends, and perhaps enemies, in a way that we are not able to do in our everyday lives.


We have already journeyed to the world of the dragonfly, the butterfly and the moth, so you will not be viewing many of these creatures in the following images.


You will see many bees, wasps, and flies. But more than that, you will be seeing features concerning these insects that you probably did not even know they had. Macrophotography allows us to view these creatures up close and personal.


You will be able to see the wings of these insects, something that is often hard to do with a flying insect. You will see their alien type mouth parts and their hairy bodies. You will be able to view their segmented body, legs and antenna. And let's not forget about their often over-sized compound eyes.


But even more important, macrophotography will provide you a view that is better than you would ever be able to see with the naked eye. And you can take as long at you want to admire the intricate details, because our subjects will not be flying away. So enjoy the journey through the macrophotograpy of flying insects.


Clicking on most images will allow you to view a larger version of that image.



In the images below, notice the different types of antenna that flying insects have. Notice also, the different types and sizes of wings, plus all the different ways and places that they attach to the insects body.


Click thumbnail to view full-size
Male Blue Pansy Brushfooted ButterflyExtracted from above image. I am always amazed at the intricate patterns that can be found on a butterfly's wings.A very interesting insect indeed! It poses with its hind legs encircling its body.  Notice the hairs extending from the wings, and the appendages extending from the legs.Notice the antenna of this midge. A midge is so small people often overlook them, so to be able to see their antenna this detailed is a true treat. This image exhibits the true advantages of macrophotography.Webworm moths (Atteva punctella) feed on stiff goldenrodNotice the practically translucent wings. They look like they have been sprinkled with glitter, and the veining in the wings is apparent despite their translucency. The ribbing that is apparent on its armor-like body behind its wings is a sight provided by macrophotography.It is amazing that wings so small can keep a body so large in the air.The eyes of this wasp looks like a fireworks display.
Male Blue Pansy Brushfooted Butterfly
Male Blue Pansy Brushfooted Butterfly | Source
Extracted from above image. I am always amazed at the intricate patterns that can be found on a butterfly's wings.
Extracted from above image. I am always amazed at the intricate patterns that can be found on a butterfly's wings. | Source
A very interesting insect indeed! It poses with its hind legs encircling its body.  Notice the hairs extending from the wings, and the appendages extending from the legs.
A very interesting insect indeed! It poses with its hind legs encircling its body. Notice the hairs extending from the wings, and the appendages extending from the legs. | Source
Notice the antenna of this midge. A midge is so small people often overlook them, so to be able to see their antenna this detailed is a true treat. This image exhibits the true advantages of macrophotography.
Notice the antenna of this midge. A midge is so small people often overlook them, so to be able to see their antenna this detailed is a true treat. This image exhibits the true advantages of macrophotography. | Source
Source
Webworm moths (Atteva punctella) feed on stiff goldenrod
Webworm moths (Atteva punctella) feed on stiff goldenrod | Source
Notice the practically translucent wings. They look like they have been sprinkled with glitter, and the veining in the wings is apparent despite their translucency.
Notice the practically translucent wings. They look like they have been sprinkled with glitter, and the veining in the wings is apparent despite their translucency. | Source
The ribbing that is apparent on its armor-like body behind its wings is a sight provided by macrophotography.
The ribbing that is apparent on its armor-like body behind its wings is a sight provided by macrophotography. | Source
It is amazing that wings so small can keep a body so large in the air.
It is amazing that wings so small can keep a body so large in the air. | Source
The eyes of this wasp looks like a fireworks display.
The eyes of this wasp looks like a fireworks display. | Source


The images below show close-ups of many different insect's compound eyes. Take time to look at their front legs and their antenna also.


Click thumbnail to view full-size
Many insect's eyes are disproportionately large compared to the rest of their head and bodies. Their compound eyes are displayed very well in this image.F. Colletidae: These white bees are holding onto their perch with their mouth parts.Notice the hair on this wasp's body, and the drops of water hanging from its wings.Male Horse Fly: Notice the color stripes across its eyes, its very small antenna and its sucking mouth parts.This fly's eyes appear to be extremely large when viewed head on.Notice the texture on the antenna, the hair on the insect and the U-shaped eyes.It is interesting to note that the bee has sent its antenna down into the flower also.This bee is sprinkled with pollen. It has started its collection on its rear legs.European paper wasp (polistes dominula): This wasp looks intelligent. Notice the barbs on its forefoot and its mouth parts. Its mouth parts seem to mimic what it is currently standing on.
Many insect's eyes are disproportionately large compared to the rest of their head and bodies. Their compound eyes are displayed very well in this image.
Many insect's eyes are disproportionately large compared to the rest of their head and bodies. Their compound eyes are displayed very well in this image. | Source
Source
F. Colletidae: These white bees are holding onto their perch with their mouth parts.
F. Colletidae: These white bees are holding onto their perch with their mouth parts. | Source
Notice the hair on this wasp's body, and the drops of water hanging from its wings.
Notice the hair on this wasp's body, and the drops of water hanging from its wings. | Source
Male Horse Fly: Notice the color stripes across its eyes, its very small antenna and its sucking mouth parts.
Male Horse Fly: Notice the color stripes across its eyes, its very small antenna and its sucking mouth parts. | Source
This fly's eyes appear to be extremely large when viewed head on.
This fly's eyes appear to be extremely large when viewed head on. | Source
Notice the texture on the antenna, the hair on the insect and the U-shaped eyes.
Notice the texture on the antenna, the hair on the insect and the U-shaped eyes. | Source
It is interesting to note that the bee has sent its antenna down into the flower also.
It is interesting to note that the bee has sent its antenna down into the flower also. | Source
This bee is sprinkled with pollen. It has started its collection on its rear legs.
This bee is sprinkled with pollen. It has started its collection on its rear legs. | Source
European paper wasp (polistes dominula): This wasp looks intelligent. Notice the barbs on its forefoot and its mouth parts. Its mouth parts seem to mimic what it is currently standing on.
European paper wasp (polistes dominula): This wasp looks intelligent. Notice the barbs on its forefoot and its mouth parts. Its mouth parts seem to mimic what it is currently standing on. | Source
Click thumbnail to view full-size
Macrophotography allows us to view this moth's antennas with extreme clarity. This view reminds me of a startled rabbit.The hairs on the body of this robber is longer than its antenna. Notice also the segments of the body.Robber: This image shows interesting (toes) appendages on the end of its feet.DragonflyRobber Fly Dining on a MothThe eyes of this Crane Fly is a sight to behold. Notice also the hair on the mouth parts and the texture on the legs.Notice the eyes and the mouth parts on this dragonfly.Notice the changes in the hair's density on different parts of this bee's body.Digger Waso, Ammophila sabulosa nipponica: This insect's slender abdomen, barbed legs, and pointed mouth creates and interesting view.
Macrophotography allows us to view this moth's antennas with extreme clarity. This view reminds me of a startled rabbit.
Macrophotography allows us to view this moth's antennas with extreme clarity. This view reminds me of a startled rabbit. | Source
The hairs on the body of this robber is longer than its antenna. Notice also the segments of the body.
The hairs on the body of this robber is longer than its antenna. Notice also the segments of the body. | Source
Robber: This image shows interesting (toes) appendages on the end of its feet.
Robber: This image shows interesting (toes) appendages on the end of its feet. | Source
Dragonfly
Dragonfly | Source
Robber Fly Dining on a Moth
Robber Fly Dining on a Moth | Source
The eyes of this Crane Fly is a sight to behold. Notice also the hair on the mouth parts and the texture on the legs.
The eyes of this Crane Fly is a sight to behold. Notice also the hair on the mouth parts and the texture on the legs. | Source
Notice the eyes and the mouth parts on this dragonfly.
Notice the eyes and the mouth parts on this dragonfly. | Source
Source
Notice the changes in the hair's density on different parts of this bee's body.
Notice the changes in the hair's density on different parts of this bee's body. | Source
Digger Waso, Ammophila sabulosa nipponica: This insect's slender abdomen, barbed legs, and pointed mouth creates and interesting view.
Digger Waso, Ammophila sabulosa nipponica: This insect's slender abdomen, barbed legs, and pointed mouth creates and interesting view. | Source
Bumble Bee
Bumble Bee | Source


The bee above seems to be cocking its head in understanding.


There are so many things to see in the photo below. Notice the different types of hair and fur on the legs and body. The antenna and mouth parts are very easily viewed in this image. Look at the ends of its front feet, it almost appears to have toes.


Source
Source


The insect above has a piercing mouth part. Its antenna is very interesting.



Many of the images below allow you to get a good view of the insects' antennas, eyes, legs and mouth parts.


Click thumbnail to view full-size
Wasp: The U-shaped eye is clearly seen in this image. And the cutting mouth parts are also very visible.Fly: The hair on the body of this fly is clearly displayed in this image.Green Bush Fly: Notice the hairs on its body, the coloration of its body, and the veining of its wings.This wasp is grooming itself.Bee: Notice the segmented antenna. It is coated with pollen.The mouth of this insect is very peculiar. Hoverfly: The antenna of this fly is very unique.Bee
Wasp: The U-shaped eye is clearly seen in this image. And the cutting mouth parts are also very visible.
Wasp: The U-shaped eye is clearly seen in this image. And the cutting mouth parts are also very visible. | Source
Fly: The hair on the body of this fly is clearly displayed in this image.
Fly: The hair on the body of this fly is clearly displayed in this image. | Source
Green Bush Fly: Notice the hairs on its body, the coloration of its body, and the veining of its wings.
Green Bush Fly: Notice the hairs on its body, the coloration of its body, and the veining of its wings. | Source
This wasp is grooming itself.
This wasp is grooming itself. | Source
Source
Bee: Notice the segmented antenna. It is coated with pollen.
Bee: Notice the segmented antenna. It is coated with pollen. | Source
The mouth of this insect is very peculiar.
The mouth of this insect is very peculiar. | Source
Hoverfly: The antenna of this fly is very unique.
Hoverfly: The antenna of this fly is very unique. | Source
Bee
Bee | Source


In the photos below, notice the interesting wings and eyes on these insects. Notice the different types of antennae and the hairs on these insects.


Click thumbnail to view full-size
Banded demoiselle damselfly (Calopteryx splendens) - The photographer that took this picture felt that this was the most beautiful insect in his part of the world. The colors are truly breath-taking.Fly: Notice the stripes on this insect's eyes.BeeBeeThought to be a male mosquito.This image clearly shows how insects could be the inspiration for some alien characters we have seen in the movies.This is a face that only a mother could love. This fly has very short antenna.The intricate detail in this insect's wings is truly beautiful. Notice the hair on the wings and the interesting antenna.
Banded demoiselle damselfly (Calopteryx splendens) - The photographer that took this picture felt that this was the most beautiful insect in his part of the world. The colors are truly breath-taking.
Banded demoiselle damselfly (Calopteryx splendens) - The photographer that took this picture felt that this was the most beautiful insect in his part of the world. The colors are truly breath-taking. | Source
Source
Fly: Notice the stripes on this insect's eyes.
Fly: Notice the stripes on this insect's eyes. | Source
Bee
Bee | Source
Source
Bee
Bee | Source
Thought to be a male mosquito.
Thought to be a male mosquito. | Source
This image clearly shows how insects could be the inspiration for some alien characters we have seen in the movies.
This image clearly shows how insects could be the inspiration for some alien characters we have seen in the movies. | Source
This is a face that only a mother could love. This fly has very short antenna.
This is a face that only a mother could love. This fly has very short antenna. | Source
The intricate detail in this insect's wings is truly beautiful. Notice the hair on the wings and the interesting antenna.
The intricate detail in this insect's wings is truly beautiful. Notice the hair on the wings and the interesting antenna. | Source
Source
Source

Interesting Insect - Cloak and Dagger Cuckoo Bee

This a very different and interesting bee. This is a Cloak and Dagger Cuckoo bee. This bee is homeless and rests and sleeps out in the open on a twig just as this one (see below) is doing. This bee does not build a nest or a hive, and they do not collect pollen.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Cloak and Dagger Cuckoo BeeCloak and Dagger Cuckoo BeeTeddy Bear BeeBlue Banded BeeSpotted Cuckoo Bee
Cloak and Dagger Cuckoo Bee
Cloak and Dagger Cuckoo Bee | Source
Cloak and Dagger Cuckoo Bee
Cloak and Dagger Cuckoo Bee | Source
Teddy Bear Bee
Teddy Bear Bee | Source
Blue Banded Bee
Blue Banded Bee | Source
Spotted Cuckoo Bee
Spotted Cuckoo Bee | Source

Their behavior is very similar to their namesake, the cuckoo bird. The Cloak and Dagger Cuckoo bee lays its eggs in the nests of other bees, such as the Teddy bear bee and the Blue Banded bee. The term for this behavior is know as kleptoparasitism, which literally means parasitism by theft.

As the Cloak and Dagger Cuckoo bee makes its rounds during the day, they observe the Teddy Bear bee or the Blue Banded bee and then follow them back to their burrows. Waiting for the right moment, they then enter the burrow and lay an egg, many times killing the offspring that is already present in the burrow.


A Pairing of Moths
A Pairing of Moths | Source

Macrophotography of Flying Insects

Through the macrophotography of flying insects, we have journeyed into a new world of beauty and have observed flying insects in spectacular ways. Many people fear bees and wasps, some, justifiably, because of their severe allergies to bee and wasp stings. Through the use of macrophotography, we are all able to view these insects safely and even better than we could have done with the naked eye.


I hope you have enjoyed our trip through the macrophotography of flying insects and will join me in another macrophotography adventure:



More by this Author


Comments: "64 Macrophotography / Microphotography of Flying Insects / Bugs ~ Images of Flying Insects or Bugs" 24 comments

RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

Wow, that's closer to buggies than I imagined. :)

I'm interested in the concept of macrophotography, but with flowers. However, the importance of these insect close ups can't be denied. Thanks for sharing the info!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

RTalloni - good to see you. It has been a while. You ought to check out the flower macrophotography hub then.There are lots of lovely flowers in it.

Thanks for stopping by!


5 years ago

Voted up. Impressive photos! Some of the colors almost remind one of evening gowns at the DAR, Washington DC.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - Some of the colors could very well be considered to be opulent, couldn't they?

Thanks for the votes and for stopping by!


carol3san profile image

carol3san 5 years ago from Hollywood Florida

They a beautiful, but scary looking at the same time...voted interesting.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

carol3san - I can tell that you really do not like bugs, do you? They can be really beautiful if they keep to themselves. Thanks for stopping by!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 5 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

Incredible pics! Up and awesome.


Chasing Riley profile image

Chasing Riley 5 years ago from Los Angeles

Really amazing! Funny how it's easier to look at flying insects than spiders. The close up of the wasp is fascinating. The eyes look like they are textured.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

WillStarr - Thanks for stopping by and for the votes. Glad you enjoyed it!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Chasing Riley, good to see you! The eye looks that way because it is a compound eye. I like the way it cocks its head, giving it an almost inquisitive look.

I glad that you are enjoying them.

Thanks for stopping by!


DonnaCosmato profile image

DonnaCosmato 5 years ago from USA

Wow, this is awesome and what a tremendous amount of time and effort you have invested! I kept going back to the close up of the moth's antennae...it was unbelievable. Voted up and shared on my social network.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Donna Cosmato - I'm glad you enjoyed it. It truly is unbelievable in what macrophotography will allow you to see - such as the moth's antenna. Thanks for the votes and for sharing.


5 years ago

Yes; the moth's antenna look like a rabbit's ears! (You can almost hear it say: 'What's up, Doc?')


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f- LOL! That's true!


5 years ago

LOL. Anyway, maybe Walt Disney studied zoology before learning to draw ... .


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - It could have happened that way. Don't know.


5 years ago

I guess I was writing tongue in cheek about Disney, but maybe it did happen that way; I don't know. Blessings.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - I do not either. Thanks!


debbie roberts profile image

debbie roberts 5 years ago from Greece

Wow, some quite stunning pictures. An interesting hub.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

debbie - I am pleased that you enjoyed it. Thanks for stopping by!


kiske 4 years ago

OOOOO MYYYYYYYYYYY GOOOOOOOOOD


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 4 years ago from Texas Author

Thanks kiske! It is pretty obvious that you liked the pictures. Thanks for stopping by!


ingleslenobel profile image

ingleslenobel 3 years ago from Holmbury St.Mary, Surrey, UK

Nice. Cindy, I'm trying to contact you about use of my photo. Thank you


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 2 years ago from Texas Author

Use of your photo? I will check my emails. Thanks so much.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working