Major Acts of Congress: A Multiple-Choice Quiz and Study Guide for Students and Homeschoolers

Congress Meets at the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C.

Sometimes It Does Take an Act of Congress!

  • How many times in your lifetime have you heard someone say "It would take an act of Congress" to get something done?
  • Well, in many, many cases it did and that is what this quiz is all about. I am going to give you a brief overview of an Act of Congress and give you choices on the official name of the act. Whatever your reason is for wanting or needing to know such information, I hope this helps. Maybe you are just a trivia lover or a student. Give it a try!
  • I hope you will find this quiz and study guide informative and entertaining. Good luck!

Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States managed to lead the country through the Civil War, preserve the Union, and successfully abolish slavery.  He issued a pocket veto on the Wade-Davis Bill in an effort to reunify the nation.
Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States managed to lead the country through the Civil War, preserve the Union, and successfully abolish slavery. He issued a pocket veto on the Wade-Davis Bill in an effort to reunify the nation.

Presidential Veto Power

  • Sometimes, even when an act is passed by both the House of Representatives and the United States Senate, it gets vetoed by the President of the United States and never gets enacted. One such example is the Wade-Davis Bill, which was approved by Congress, but ultimately pocket vetoed by President Abraham Lincoln.
  • The Wade-Davis Bill, which was a program proposed for the Reconstruction of the South, was written by Senator Benjamin Wade of Ohio and Representative Henry Winter Davis of Maryland and it was very harsh on the treatment of the states that had seceded. Both men were considered to be "radical" Republicans and they, along with many others, became outraged over the Presidential veto.
  • Part of the bill dealt with the states that had seceded being able to rejoin the Union. Lincoln, however, felt that the states never had the right to secede, so rejoining the Union was not necessary, as they were considered to be still a part of it. Lincoln favored a much more lenient approach, and apparently convinced many more people that leniency was the best answer as he was re-elected in 1864 with a landslide victory.

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evelynsaenz 2 years ago from Vermont

I like quizzes and though I didn't do as well as I would have liked I did learn a lot.

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