Choose a Career Path - Major Pains!

Who would DO that?

One semester in college I was a paid note-taker for the Disability office. I realized then, sitting in a Business Economics class, I would never become an accountant. How could anyone get into a subject like that? Yet there were people asking questions, jotting down answers and even leaning forward in their seats! They were actually interested in what was being said. Hold on business majors…don’t get angry yet. What I learned that day is how utterly wonderful it is to have you in this world! Without people like you, this world would be in a very economically unsound condition.

I’ve heard so much lately about declaring a major. For those who are still undecided I sympathize. Picking a major seems to be like picking out a car. Pick the right style and the choice brings forth self-esteem and confidence. You may suddenly be dreaming of the most exotic places you can visit in life. But pick a lemon and you will most likely stagnate along the side of some dirt road and never get to where you know you should be. I am just incredibly thankful that there are so many makes and models! Think about it…could you really be satisfied letting someone else pick a car out for you if you were the one paying the price?

Going around the room in a smaller class of mine, I was amazed to see how many different majors were being pursued. Out of about thirty students there were only three that had decided on the same one. This educational diversity is what the real world is made of and though I would never aspire to be an agriculturist, I am nutritionally indebted to those who have.

When I first got into college I was overwhelmed by the thought of having to make a decision like picking a major. I didn’t get to attend college until the age of 38 so I wanted to do everything! Yet, once narrowed down, the ultimate decision was based on the question, “What skills do I have that can be of the most benefit to others?”

Sounds like a terribly noble question, doesn’t it? My real insight came when I began to understand that the definition of “benefit” is open to a broad spectrum of interpretation. Who can say whether the man at the bank who gave the architect his loan is more or less beneficial to him than the brick-maker that provides him with his means to create his masterpiece? Who is more important, the dancer or the person who creates the machine that plays the music? The electrician or the lamp designer? The inventor or the one using the invention?

If you are still undecided I suggest you enjoy the ride. Get as much of an education as you can. You don’t have to choose a major. If you wait, one will choose you. You’ll be intensely engrossed in something someday and someone will tell you, “You know, you’re really good at that! You ought to do it for a living.” Suddenly your college direction will have more meaning. After all, the greatest job in the world is when you find out what you love to do and then get someone else to pay you for doing it!

Life is filled with wonderful variety. Variety of choice, of opinions and of dreams. We are a culture of invention because we are a culture of intense interaction. Our reliance upon each other for the culmination of all that we are as individuals is both ironic and endearing. There is nothing unethical in sharing what you know you already are rather than sharing what you think you should be. A Major will come to you. Finding out where you’re going when you aren’t even sure why you’re here is a major pain (pun intended).

Take a Career Exploration class. Go to a job fair. Talk to people you admire. Find the career counselor’s office, at the University of your choice and hook up with a computer program on career discovery. Investigate the possibilities. “Fogwalk” (as my career counselor, Dr. Maw calls it). Don’t major in a subject. Major in yourself.

 

 

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