Medical Antiques Displayed: A Historical Reminder of Care

This knowledgeable physician is a gracious and talented listener.

Dr. V.J. Conrad, M.D. who shared her collection of medically oriented items.
Dr. V.J. Conrad, M.D. who shared her collection of medically oriented items.

Whether you are an aged or youthful visitor, enjoy your trip to this historical medical display of equipment and medicinal preparations.

Here is an opportunity for remembering or discovering usable medical items from long ago. Enter these halls of memory, or examine this interesting display of objects newly discerned. Whichever you accomplish because of your own age, just imagine all the magnificent quality of our inherited medical toolery displayed in these photographs.

These items are now exhibited in the current office setting of Dr. V.J. Conrad who has her practice in central Oklahoma. Let me state my appreciative gratitude to this knowledgeable and competent physician for her permission to share these photographs of her antique medical collection.  They do indeed speak volumes of historical importance to those who desire to observe.

A well-used physican's medical bag. It now holds a Christmas cactus in a container.

This is the actual bag of a pioneer physician, Dr. Arthur Ruhl, many of whose medical items are displayed here.
This is the actual bag of a pioneer physician, Dr. Arthur Ruhl, many of whose medical items are displayed here.
Dr. Ruhl's medical bag is stiff and corroded with age but it surely holds a bagful of memories. He carried this bag on many mercy tasks in the early 1900s.
Dr. Ruhl's medical bag is stiff and corroded with age but it surely holds a bagful of memories. He carried this bag on many mercy tasks in the early 1900s.

An interesting array of old-time medical paraphernalia.

Some of the vintage medical items pictured may be well over seventy years old. Most of them were obtained from the elderly daughter of a deceased physician who had passed from this life after the age of ninety, and that more than twenty-five years ago. They now have reigned in prominent display at this physician’s office for about twenty-five years and receive ample interest and comment from those who see them.

Dr. V.J. Conrad, M.D. is the accomplished, intelligent and appreciated physician who has the generosity to share this exciting tribute with those who visit her office. She has practiced in Edmond for about twenty-five years now, and has gained successful expertise in the treatment of chronic illness and allergy, assisting her patients to regain a healthier life status via not only medical management, but whole- life administration of healthy practices. Additionally, Dr.Conrad has recently completed extensive research on several compilations of supplements for specific health conditions and plans to soon be able to offer some of these to her public. These compilations will not contain any fillers or artificial ingredients. This discerning physician practices continuous learning and utilizes research in health areas to the benefit of appreciative patients. But that is another hub.

An old-fashioned elaborate burner and a useful balance scale.

The warmer was typical of a fine medical office or a home necessity. Please see comments below about this item identification.
The warmer was typical of a fine medical office or a home necessity. Please see comments below about this item identification.
The balance scale was useful for measuring herbal and other preparations of all kinds.
The balance scale was useful for measuring herbal and other preparations of all kinds.
This picture draws the attention of those who remember its publication, and those who fear its 'meaning':  "Am I going to get a shot?".  "There?"
This picture draws the attention of those who remember its publication, and those who fear its 'meaning': "Am I going to get a shot?". "There?"

Medical hardware, and fun old-fashioned magazine ads too.

Among her valued antique collection are bottles of liquid medicines, powders, bandaging and wound supplies. There are vintage surgical sutures, cast materials, and common items such as aspirin and merthiolate. There is an elaborate Bunsen burner, a simple balance scale, an electrical healing appliance; a metal/glass syringe with a needle that pierced many ‘buns’, I’m sure; several homeopathic and herbal preparations, just a diversity of useful medical equipment from pioneer years. Several bottles of natural remedies still contain some of their medicines. There are newer beautifully framed pictures of ancient (to some) magazine advertisements bandying their nutritious foods, as well as one particularly popular picture by Norman Rockwell: That one you may well remember!

Framed displays of magazine ads are simple, clearly unassuming invitations directed at YOU!

There are several bright advertisements of cereals, butter, cough syrup - and lastly one fantastic vitamin advertisement by Lucille Ball!

Enjoy these actual advertisements of persuasion for butter, cereal, cherry cough syrup. Breakfast food advertisements have been around a long time...but my have they changed! And multiplied!

Many the young man who sees this Norman Rockwell publication and wonders if it is a portrayal of what is coming...for himself?

And dear poor Lucy...somebody forgot the sugar flavoring! But she tried, she tried! She really did try to NOT give that look!

Magazine advertisements were bright, catchy, and void of explicit sexuality or innuendo. Most portrayed cheery identifications of their simple ingredients.

Anyone for a delicious bowl of nutritious cereal this morning?
Anyone for a delicious bowl of nutritious cereal this morning?
Graham crackers have been eaten for almost forever!
Graham crackers have been eaten for almost forever!
Puffed cereal.  Nutritious cereal advertised for children, a new inventive way to delight.
Puffed cereal. Nutritious cereal advertised for children, a new inventive way to delight.
Butter.  Really fresh butter!  No preservatives, no artificial coloring.
Butter. Really fresh butter! No preservatives, no artificial coloring.
Ohhh, he loved this cherry cough syrup! Do you suppose it made his hair grow better too?
Ohhh, he loved this cherry cough syrup! Do you suppose it made his hair grow better too?
Poor, poor Lucille Ball.   She just couldn't....uhhh....YUK!!
Poor, poor Lucille Ball. She just couldn't....uhhh....YUK!!

A rare antique 'X-Ray Outfit' machine!

Perhaps the rarest of items is this beautifully finished cabinet type X-ray Outfit. It is called such because it was too ‘young’ to be designated what we currently call an x-ray ‘machine’; it is an actual predecessor to our modern method of producing x-ray films to determine fractures, tumors, lung disease, etc.

Front view of the X-Ray Outfit.
Front view of the X-Ray Outfit.
Right side view of cabinet where the 'power' dials were.
Right side view of cabinet where the 'power' dials were.
Top view of cabinet where 'something' extruded the mystery-ray electrical system. Perhaps it was the holder of the film to be exposed to the mystery ray.
Top view of cabinet where 'something' extruded the mystery-ray electrical system. Perhaps it was the holder of the film to be exposed to the mystery ray.

And now...Surgical suturing supplies. No cats needed!

Here are several types of surgical sewing threads, mostly catgut, which is not actually from cats. The intestines of sheep, cattle, horses, pigs or goats was treated with preservatives such as phenol or sulfur compounds or formalin, and the fibrous cords remaining were stretched and formed into thin threads for suturing wounds and surgical procedures. Amazingly, some are silkworm gut and silk twist sutures. Some are preserved in formalin type liquids as that was one main process of sustaining sterility. Others are packaged individually in paper. (Note: The sutures of today are stronger, finer and formed of fine synthetic materials; no more intestines!  Like the absorbable catgut and silkwork threads, some of the modern sutures are also absorbable by the body. Either type could possibly cause a sensitivity/allergic response.  That has not yet been fully overcome by modernized technology.)

Catgut.  Surgical sutures preserved in paper packaging.
Catgut. Surgical sutures preserved in paper packaging.
Surgical sutures in vials for sterile preservation.
Surgical sutures in vials for sterile preservation.
Silkworm gut and silk twist surgical threads.  Wow!
Silkworm gut and silk twist surgical threads. Wow!

Many bottles still contain some medications.

There are large and small amber bottles of varied herbal, homeopathic and chemical type remedies necessary for a full family type medical practice. Cough medicines, malaria or grippe remedies, and as you may decipher, other commonly used treatment preparations are shown.

It might be particularly exciting to think of an injection with the displayed sturdy metal and glass apparatus. You’d hope the needle had been recently sharpened? I'm sure this item pierced many a 'bun'!  Did you break a leg jumping off the wagon? An old-time competent physician could get your bones encased in no time! No matter the cast seemed to weigh a ton or two.

Anti-malaria medication.  The homeopathic Ferrum Phos is considered a 'polycrest' remedy in homeopathic medicine today.
Anti-malaria medication. The homeopathic Ferrum Phos is considered a 'polycrest' remedy in homeopathic medicine today.
Caripeptic for a 'sour stomach'.  Wonder what it tasted like?  Not cherry, even with the aromatic oils added.
Caripeptic for a 'sour stomach'. Wonder what it tasted like? Not cherry, even with the aromatic oils added.
For La Grippe, classical symptoms of colds, fever, achiness, chills.  Its main components are useful today for those same symptoms. Gelsemium is a typical polycrest remedy for those who insist on having their feet uncovered while in bed.
For La Grippe, classical symptoms of colds, fever, achiness, chills. Its main components are useful today for those same symptoms. Gelsemium is a typical polycrest remedy for those who insist on having their feet uncovered while in bed.
You'd hope this syringe needle had not only been sterilized, but sharpened! Recently!
You'd hope this syringe needle had not only been sterilized, but sharpened! Recently!
The bottom level shows cast materials, one for an arm or hand.
The bottom level shows cast materials, one for an arm or hand.
Pictured on the right side area is more casting material among the variety of medicines and bottles.
Pictured on the right side area is more casting material among the variety of medicines and bottles.

Here are more of the amber bottles in varied sizes, and healing liquids they held, till needed for the doctor’s prescription. Need to relieve an itch or rash? Some of these old-time medications are very similar to the basis of currently available medications.

Cathartic.  For to do you know what for...spring cleaning?
Cathartic. For to do you know what for...spring cleaning?
Ointments and salves for various needs. Note the 'silloid' ointment.  This silver creme was then and is now a valid antiseptic.
Ointments and salves for various needs. Note the 'silloid' ointment. This silver creme was then and is now a valid antiseptic.

Here are more of the then commonly-used medications in their aged containers. Note several of the stated ingredients have been utilized in healing preparations even today. How far have we come – or not? There is continuing argument today about the authentic use of many old-time medications and treatments, particularly in the homeopathic realm. But they must have worked well enough and the experienced wisdom of the general practitioner – Doctor of everything – served that day in compassion and often with sacrificial necessity in times of hardship for patient and/or doctor.

Some further discovery of how/why certain chemicals work to heal or work to detriment, is ongoing research today – and should continue to be explored, as the technology of today’s science and technology is vastly superior to what was available fifty or a hundred years ago. But also there must continue to be the compassion and wisdom of ‘family medicine’ in propagating our new medical treatments, for the patient’s total health should be vitally held as no. 1 priority.

Various items for many disorders shown.

Headache powders, tabs, camphor and boric acid too.  Utilitarian.
Headache powders, tabs, camphor and boric acid too. Utilitarian.
Got an upset tummy?  This one is not so aged as most other items.
Got an upset tummy? This one is not so aged as most other items.
A mixture of prominent medications for varied purposes including heart/blood pressure.
A mixture of prominent medications for varied purposes including heart/blood pressure.
A healing antibacterial/fungal combination for female problems.
A healing antibacterial/fungal combination for female problems.
Lumbago? Gout? Rheumatism?  Take note!
Lumbago? Gout? Rheumatism? Take note!
Pineapple flavored morphine.  And with squill!
Pineapple flavored morphine. And with squill!

 

Of course to help yourself stay healthy, you need your vitamins and minerals...and if you have a ....rash, the solution might be here.

Each era of medical treatment has its wax and wane, and as new discoveries of methodology or disease causation occur, many changes are assimilated into ‘orthodox administration’ sometimes found to be not for the good of the patient as treatments evolve: Possibly as history unveils future developments, neither for the betterment of the general medical society.  Often, seeming progression basically garners increased monetary values rather than furthering genuine health values.

"palatable...for potent reconstruction".  I'll bet it did!
"palatable...for potent reconstruction". I'll bet it did!
Kollesol, a surgical antiseptic containing 'creosote' portion. There were none/few antibiotics as we know them today, then available.
Kollesol, a surgical antiseptic containing 'creosote' portion. There were none/few antibiotics as we know them today, then available.
It sounds good. It has echinacea and saw palmetto; imagine!
It sounds good. It has echinacea and saw palmetto; imagine!
Iodine and Chlorox, valued basics then and now.
Iodine and Chlorox, valued basics then and now.
For baby's diaper rash - or just to 'comfort his skin'.
For baby's diaper rash - or just to 'comfort his skin'.

Basic foundations of professional compassion should be valued.


As we explore basic simple foundations of the medical past, perhaps we should keep their old-fashioned principles in mind. The interaction of physician and patient in pioneer days was often long term and considerate as an ideal.

Perhaps you might remember generational stories told of ‘how the doctor rode his horse in the middle of the night, through a snowstorm, over the flood waters or muddy roads, spent most of the night caring for a very ill patient who lived miles from assistance’. Or perhaps ‘how great-grandpa had to pay the doctor with chickens or eggs, or corn from the field harvest’. Or 'how the compassionate doctor-friend helped dig the stillborn's shallow grave in the cold of winter'.


Yes, these specific requirements may now be obsolete per se, but the genuine professional consideration of physician for/from patient is still a realistic desirability – and an uncommon achievement in today’s medical forte.

Continued technological discovery is ongoing and necessary. So is integrity, wisdom, and freedom, as they are the basic triad of genuine responsible care.

Then also, ‘Do no (purposed) harm’. Yes, let educational inventive freedoms ring throughout hospitals, medical research foundations, the learning-seeking scientists and students, and even those who would research to assist their own personal health issues however they choose!

Open pathways again to realistic discovery without the interference of overly-governed restraints that may prevent genuine health reforms or treatments. (Re: Explore the Bryzenskis, the Jonathan Wrights, the Linus Paulings, the Royal Rifes, the Albert Sanchezs’, and the other many searchers who cared --yet failed in achieving acceptance and validation of their discovered ‘cures’: Possibilities that never reached the light of public day in orthodox medical practice because of extensive restrictions and excessive governmental or political controls.)

Wow! May God bless America with freedom, as long as He can! And may our world-people be benefited individually and collectively because of it! When integrated self-help, herbal or homeopathic, or electrical medicine, or some yet unknown healing invention is found to assist the general population on an individual basis without extensive financial or physical sacrifice, again we shall celebrate!

More power to those who respect the compassionate findings of history and continue to reach to new heights in the technological inventive world they enter for individual good and for the discovery of heightened health probabilities for all!

Physician's sample of 'mineral oil'.
Physician's sample of 'mineral oil'.
Good for a sore throat, I'm sure.
Good for a sore throat, I'm sure.
An electrical apparatus for pain relief.  Sounds like 'today' doesn't it.  "Let's roll..."
An electrical apparatus for pain relief. Sounds like 'today' doesn't it. "Let's roll..."

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Comments 50 comments

BkCreative profile image

BkCreative 6 years ago from Brooklyn, New York City

Well, this was absolutely wonderful! Wow! Thanks for taking the time to include all the photos. I got a kick out of reading all the ingredient labels. Interesting that homeopathy was accepted - and now it is considered 'new age.'

Brilliant hub! Thanks a million!


Dominique Teng 6 years ago

Thank you for this fantastic hub! Years ago I visited the Museum Of Medicine in Heildelberg, Germany. I was absolutely fascinated. On the one hand you admire people's effort to cure the disease, their ingenuity, and the science and wisdom involved. On the other, you feel, you are really lucky you did not live then.

My dentist had a really sadistic vein. He had an ancient drilling tools displayed in such a way that you had no choice, but to look at them while he was working on his teeth. I saw an ancient, hand powered dental drilling machine in action on a side walk in Karachi, Pakistan. Such tools are in our museums! But people were really lucky that they did not have to lose their teeth right away.

Your article captures the notion between admiration and fear of medical inventions of the past.


ehern33 profile image

ehern33 6 years ago

What a fascinating hub and so detailed. It is scary in a sense but back then, it was the only choice. Some modern day things are scary too, which sometime in the future, someone will say about us now, scary stuff what they used.. LOL


anglnwu profile image

anglnwu 6 years ago

Wow, what an interesting collection of medical items. Very informative and I can't help but think that these medical inventions are ingenious, even by today's standard. Thanks for the lovely hub.


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 6 years ago from Central United States of America Author

Thanks, fellow hubbers for your comments - glad you enjoyed the pics as much as I did! They are indeed fascinating and portray an interesting era of 'where we were'.

Dominique, I think every dentist has a 'big drill', huh! And that's not said with tongue-in-cheek! :-) And I'd like to visit that museum in Germany...got a hub on it?

BkCreative, I'm glad there is currently a lot of homeopathy out there now, and it can be so often helpful!

Ehern33, agreed! I think someday our surgery will look like barbarism! Seems electro-nano healing is slow in coming...

Anglnwu, I agree about the old inventions were truly ingenious; it seems there was so much more focused intent on 'real healings' in that day. Though it seems they had much less to use technologically, they had a lot of wit, wisdom and success!


ethel smith profile image

ethel smith 6 years ago from Kingston-Upon-Hull

Glad I am around today. Scary but interesting :)


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 6 years ago from Central United States of America Author

ethel smith, glad you read and commented. I'm glad for all the technological stuff we have now, but that pioneer wisdom could go a long way then too. Guess medicine will always have new corners to turn. Thanks for sharing comment!


jill of alltrades profile image

jill of alltrades 6 years ago from Philippines

That was a fascinating walk through all those antique stuff! I truly enjoyed that!

It's interesting to note that many of the active ingredients of various medication then are still the same ingredients being used today. Then alcohol seems to be a common solvent for most of them. And there is a pineapple flavored morphine? Fascinating!

Thanks for sharing frogyfish!


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 6 years ago from Central United States of America Author

jill of alltrades, I too thought these items were very interesting - and you mention the presence today of many ingredients used then - isn't that greatly amazing! They must have really worked... :-) (I think so.)


clavin 6 years ago

Loved the pics and info - cute doctor too.


Jerilee Wei profile image

Jerilee Wei 6 years ago from United States

Enjoyed this article very much. The bunsun burner you depicted puzzles me. I used to own an antique shop and once bought an identical one at an auction of stuff from an old hardware store that had closed with it's inventory still intact and the building just sat for years and years. All of the inventory was mostly still in the original boxes. It was marked as an creotsol burner and further research at the time turned up a case with the U.S. postal system (apparently sold via mail also) for fraud. The two I had and resold were very attractive.


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 6 years ago from Central United States of America Author

Jerilee Wei, thanks for your input. Only thing I know about the burner is that it belonged to the pioneer physician - and my use of 'bunsun' was MY term. I am curious as to what postal system fraud occurred - was it not an 'accepted item' to sell via mail? You have me curious...and thanks for your comment here.


Ann Nonymous profile image

Ann Nonymous 6 years ago from Virginia

This was a very, very interesting and unexpected hub! I wasn't sure if I would get squeamish and have to leave –LOL- but I thoroughly enjoyed this look into how Doctors practiced and exactly what knife the patients went under all those years ago. My favorite picture was probably of Lucille Ball...because I do love Lucy!

Thanks for this great hub, frogyfish!


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 6 years ago from Central United States of America Author

Ann Nonymous, my fav pix was also Lucille Ball! I wanted to 'bold' the writing under her pix but capsules don't allow that. Glad you enjoyed the antiques, and thanks for comment!


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa

I really enjoyed this Hub. Must agree with Jerilee. What is labelled a "bunsen" burner is in fact a creosol burner, or rather evaporator. I had asthma as a child and my folks used to put one exactly like that in my room at night and evaporate a tar-like substance to help open the tubes in the lungs. It worked. A Bunsen burner is a gas burner that is used in a chemistry lab. This burner in the pic burnt paraffin.

My maternal grandfather was a pharmacist many years ago and so the pix of medicines here was very nostalgic for me.

Thanks again for the research and writing and putting it all together so entertainingly.

Love and peace

Tony


sheila b. profile image

sheila b. 6 years ago

This hub of yours sparked childhood memories for me, of going to the doctor when they were entering the modern world but still had the old stuff around. In those days a doctors office had a specific smell, of some of those old products, and their tools were terrifying.


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 6 years ago from Central United States of America Author

tonymaco4, thank you very much for your correct labeling of that 'burner'! Very interesting indeed - and I do remember the scent of creosol stuff and turpentine used as medicines.

Glad you enjoyed the memories - maybe you should now write your own hub with your Grandpa's info...

Sheila b, glad you also enjoyed the memory lane trip...and maybe it was the tar and turpentine odors you remember.

Appreciate both of your enjoyment-commenting!


Micky Dee profile image

Micky Dee 6 years ago

Very enjoyable. Thank you Frogyfish.


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 6 years ago from Central United States of America Author

Glad you enjoyed your visit, Micky Dee. Hope you 'got' the label under Lucille Ball's pix above - it reminds me of YOU! :-)


restoremyheart profile image

restoremyheart 6 years ago

I love seeing these old pictures, and old packaging of items. That bag is great!


Aisla profile image

Aisla 6 years ago from Norway

This was a pleasure to read. I enjoyed every minute.

Have you read some of the ingredients on the medicine bottles? It's a wonder people survived and i am sure many of our ancestors were walking junkies, high as a kite most of the time. Then there is the Malaria tablets those really creased me up laughing. Take 3 four x daily and 1 on retiring. If you got through that amount the 4th one probably helped you to retire completely.........and i bet they were the size of horse pills.

Great stuff keep it up i look forward to following your very informative hubs.


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 6 years ago from Central United States of America Author

Aisla, certainly some of those medicines did some 'real good' good! I am glad you enjoyed your reading of the hub, and thank you for sharing your comments also. Glad to see you!


Deltachord profile image

Deltachord 6 years ago from United States

Really cool pictures and idea for an article. I especially like the one with Lucy. What life was like in the past always fascinates me. Thanks Frogyfish.


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 6 years ago from Central United States of America Author

Me too Deltachord. Glad you did enjoy the pictures and their 'reality'. And Lucy was always so good at ...yuk! Thank you for commenting!


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 6 years ago from Houston, Texas

Keep in mind that half the effects of medicine working or not is in the mind...thus the placebo effect. Also doctors back then, as you pointed out, were more connected in a personal way with their patients. They took care of the whole patient and family. Those were the good old days!

Really enjoyed this hub!


Deltachord profile image

Deltachord 6 years ago from United States

You're welcome frogyfish.


Cathi Sutton profile image

Cathi Sutton 6 years ago

What a great Hub! Thanks so much for the walk through history! I enjoyed this very much!


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 6 years ago from Central United States of America Author

'The good old days', really nice to travel back...

Thank you Peggy and Cathi for enjoying it all.


habee profile image

habee 6 years ago from Georgia

I think these are things I don't miss about the good old days! Excellent hub and pics!


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 6 years ago from Central United States of America Author

habee, don't you like the thought of having 'catgut' inside you?? Me neither! :-)

Thanks for enjoying the hub and pics!


Micky Dee profile image

Micky Dee 5 years ago

I knew I had been here before! I think I have that dejavoodoo thingy! Or magnesia! It's not too bad losing the memory sometimes. I get to enjoy the same things as the first time I did! Now- how did I get here?


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 5 years ago from Central United States of America Author

Hi Micky Dee. Hey, thanks for your dejavoo-DO thing...I didn't mind at all! You can come back again...! :-)


Ghost32 5 years ago

Wow. Morphine with not merely squill, but with chloroform as well!

My evil twin just whispered in my ear--wants to know if it was ever used as an early date rape drug. Figures if you could knock your date out and make sure she was feeling no pain....

Also: We certainly don't have to go back in time to view fear-inducing medical contraptions. When I saw the size of the core sample my wife's doctor once took out of her flesh, THAT was pretty impressive. The size of the needle used on a monster syringe to suck excess fluid from my shins during my bang-around rodeo days was awesome. And having a stainless steel Maglite forcibly inserted during a "routine" proctology procedure is quite attention-getting (not to mention the 8 ounces of castor oil ingested the previous evening).

Just to name a few.

Voted Up, Useful, and Awesome.


Online Medical Transcription 5 years ago

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htodd profile image

htodd 5 years ago from United States

Well Explained Hub,Thanks for sharing priceless information


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 5 years ago from Central United States of America Author

Online and htodd, thank you for visiting and appreciating the meaning behind the pictures and history. Glad you came to visit!


kimh039 profile image

kimh039 5 years ago

This is a very interesting and unique hub, frogyfish. I was thinking the dr's geriatric patients would love looking at the displays while in the waiting room! Medicine has come a long way in a short time. It is refreshing to experience both compassion and scientific expertise in today's physicians. I came from your comment on my pain in america hub, and had to laugh when the very last thing I saw here was the "electrical apparatus for pain relief!" It got me wondering... a procedure like ECT but for physical pain! Hmmm. Thank you so much for a very enriching hub. I feel as though I've just toured a medical museum:) Oh. I have.


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 4 years ago from Central United States of America Author

kimh039, glad you enjoyed your visit, and thank you for the interesting comment, thoughts. That 'pain apparatus' is evidently just a precursor of some now being produced by our newer 'techies'. It is amazing!


quotations profile image

quotations 4 years ago from Canada

A wonderful collection of antique medical devices and medications.


Enlydia Listener profile image

Enlydia Listener 4 years ago from trailer in the country

Some of those pictures look just plain scary...but maybe meds were less dangerous then. ???


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 4 years ago from Central United States of America Author

Enlydia, not really certain that some of the meds were less dangerous back then. But at least some were also quite helpful...so we learn and re-learn. Thank you for visiting the 'museum'.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida

What a treasure that these artifacts were kept intact. I am a retired Medical Technologist, and as such I really enjoyed looking at all of these wonderful photos. I remember back before a lot of the equipment we used was not sterilized, just wiped with alcohol and reused. I voted this Hub UP, etc. and I will share so others can read this interesting article as well.


whonunuwho profile image

whonunuwho 3 years ago from United States

Thank you for this bit of nostalgia and in remembering the old days of medicine. Sometimes I wonder if we were all better off, in some ways, with the old methods and medicines of simplicity. All honor and due respect for the workers in the field of medicine who donate and sacrifice their lives so that others may live and in better health.


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 3 years ago from Central United States of America Author

mary615, I worked in a hospital when I had to cleanse and autoclave lots of syringes daily - no such thing as a disposable syringe then! These medical antiques do bring lots of comments from amazed patients. Glad you stopped by and enjoyed your reminiscing.

whonunuwho, there are some of those antiques that could help us today, in my opinion...though glad we have the new technologies too. Your appreciation for those early and present medical workers is appreciated, probably more than we know. Pleased you stopped by!


innerspin profile image

innerspin 3 years ago from uk

What an interesting collection! If Tonsiline is good enough for giraffes, it's good enough for me. Wonder what the use by date is?


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 3 years ago from Central United States of America Author

innerspin, I think that Tonsilline might be expired by now...? Maybe it has smurfed into something magical?? Thanks for enjoying the collection!


wilderness profile image

wilderness 22 months ago from Boise, Idaho

Loved it! Old medical equipment always makes me shudder, particularly old surgical stuff. The fascination always brings me back, though.


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 22 months ago from Central United States of America Author

wilderness, your fascination is understandable, but I do hope your shuddering lessens now - you won't have to use any of 'this'! Glad you came by and commented.


ladyguitarpicker profile image

ladyguitarpicker 14 months ago from 3460NW 50 St Bell, Fl32619

Found your hub to be interesting, and we can see from your hub how far the medical has improved. Stella


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 14 months ago from Central United States of America Author

ladyguitarpicker, medical technology has SO advanced it is mind-boggling isn't it. Yet a few of those old meds are still 'used', though I think a bit differently. Thanks for visiting!

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