My Reviews of the Documentary: The College Conspiracy

A Documentary has Gone Viral Exposing College Education

A few of my fans, who want to keep a low profile, have asked me via e-mails have I seen the documentary titled The College Conspiracy on YouTube. I have seen the video, twice; and I must say such a documentary is long overdue. Overall, I agree with up to 90% of the video, however at times I feel the message has a few holes in it that tactful naysayers will be able to exploit. After all, in college they teach you to literally pick people a part at the slightest inaccuracy, especially from those who are considered radical. College graduates are literally littering the channel finding these holes, but they haven't come up with anything substantial to debunk the documentary, let alone prove that it's false.

I'm well aware that the group who created this documentary, the National Inflation Association, has a shady past. I've explained some of their past criminal activity in my article Understanding a Pump and Dump Scheme. When I analyze a documentary, I always pay attention to the message, not the messenger. The fact that the National Inflation Association is most likely a criminal organization doesn't dismiss their arguments, I could actually argue just the opposite. Akin to a drug dealer being an expert on the harmful affects of drugs, I'm certain the N.I.A is qualified experts on the college scam; because college itself is one giant pump and dump scheme. Complaining about Johnathan Lebed doing pump and dumps, while arguing this vindicates the college industry is the same as arguing Bernie Madoff was wrong about calling out the Federal Reserve as one big ponzi scheme. I'll explain more how college is a pump and dumb scheme later in this review.

The College Conspiracy

The Emotional Costs of Higher Education

I will go on to say that many of the rebuttals towards this documentary would be thwarted if the video had more time. The problems with higher education are so convoluted that you could have a documentary spanning for days. What I wished they spent more time on is explaining the why and how a traditional college education makes a horrible learning experience. The monetary concerns involved in attending college are no doubt important, but this isn't everything.

Here are a few of my concerns regarding the poor quality of education offered in a traditional college:

  • Over-emphasis on examinations rather than experimentation: This is a complete disrespect to the scientific model. It also makes it abundantly clear that college isn't about learning, but acquiring monetary capita in grades. If it were about learning, mistakes through trial and error would be applauded, not condemned.
  • A risk-averse environment: You're young and want to discover new things; sounds like the perfect opportunity to take a few calculated risks. . . Unfortunately, due to the very real pressure put on by constant examinations and the very real fear of failure, college simply isn't the environment to encourage risk taking. The result is students develop an incredibly conservative mind. How often have you heard an unemployed, indebted, and broke recent college graduate lament, "I've done all the 'right' things, and I'm still a failure, why?" That is the sort of mind set college indoctrinates. If the key to a successful life was to follow "the right steps" the world would be a boring place. This line of thinking kills innovation.
  • A complete disregard for language skills in everything but language based degrees: Sorry, I don't care how well you're evaluated technically if you can't read, write, and verbally communicate decently on the subject matter. Language skills simply have to count in all fields. Unfortunately, I would go on to say that those who excel in languages are actually punished for their aptitudes rather than rewarded. More on that in my next bullet point. . .
  • A divide and conquer attitude: Unfortunately, college doesn't teach students to share their knowledge amongst the world in a respectful manner. Instead, college instils a superiority thought process to the student. Colleges teach students to become elitists in their fields. The argument is you must make your written reports unnecessarily complicated, using the most anal use of the English language (if you're even allowed to use English at all), and that you must write in a certain fashion that only you and your peers can understand. This is preposterous; I have a lot more respect for a professional who writes material everyone can understand and learn, rather than a professional who writes material only his peers could possibly understand. Let's just say, through personal experience, I've had my share of sub par grades on papers due to writing in the "common tongue," as one of my professors put it. My response was that a prophet is only as good as the number of people that can comprehend his message. The jealousy demonstrated by such a professor was obvious, and I wish I could say he was a unique case. Needless to say, he didn't get my philosophical point and dismissed it as mere heresy. This brings me to my next point.
  • Education is all left brain, no right: The left brain is our ability to analyze a situation. This allows us to look at the finer details and execute precision. The right brain allows us to conceptualize a situation. This allows us to see the entire picture and see the interconnectivity of energy. This is what makes humans creative. My professor in the previous example couldn't see the opportunities in people across all fields being able to understand my work; instead he lambasted my work as being what he saw as imprecise.

College is the Ultimate Pump and Dump Scheme

College fits the definition of a pump and dump. Think about it, you're dumping a huge amount of resources into what is a speculative asset. I wish I could say you're investing in an idea, but college isn't your original idea. Besides, you were granted the freedom to have ideas from the moment you were born. You shouldn't have to pay someone for it.

I wish I could say you're investing in acquiring a skill, but many skills can be acquired without having to set foot in a college environment. Acquiring skills by your own power can be immensely satisfying, especially when you find a way to earn as you learn. Sure, you won't make much at first, but as you get better you'll make much more. Sure beats a mostly static income and having to slowly pay off debt.

What you're investing in by going to college is societal perceptions and emotions. You're paying big bucks hoping people will see value in a college degree. Already, your success is heavily dependant on the perception from others. If your degree is later stereotyped as worthless for whatever reasons; you become worthless. You have no guarantee of finding a job. You have no guarantee of any kind of return. You can't even sell the stock you've invested. Considering approximately 75% of college graduates don't have jobs in their own fields, the value of college is questionable. Anyone, with or without college, can be trained to do a job. Much of it depends on the willingness of employers.

Once you're finished college; you're dumped. The people running the college made guaranteed profit whether you're successful or not. College admissions often create pump and dumb bubbles. For example, four years ago a particular job is hot on the market, so admissions for that trade increase. Once you're finished college, you're then competing with a huge influx of students who took the same degree. Suddenly, this job is no longer in demand, but the job that everyone told you four years ago wasn’t in demand is now hiring. College is simply too slow and inflexible in 2011 to play the market appropriately. Rather than help students, colleges create pump and dump patterns/cycles that impoverish the students and make colleges very profitable.

NIA's college conspiracy explains this process very well; and if you paid attention to their message, you would have detected NIA themselves was trying to pull the exact same pump and dump tactics with questionable stocks. Consider it a good test and your awakening as a human being. Your eyes have been opened to one scheme, and hopefully if you gained any tact, you avoided a second. The key to a great con man is exposing another con man, and then offering the victims your own scheme as a solution to their misery. Society should have taught you this growing up, but you went to college. . .

My only regret I had in watching this video is the individuals involved in its creation are intelligent enough to acquire wealth ethically. They could have been a positive influence on many people. They chose the path of impatience. Instead of choosing to become a millionaire in their late 20's ethically, they choose to become multi-millionaires in their early 20's unethically. Overall, I find the entire situation tragic and such a waste.

-Donovan D. Westhaver

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Comments 3 comments

Charles Torello 5 years ago

Great blog. "What you're investing in by going to college is societal perceptions and emotions." This is your best sentence.


that was bs 4 years ago

okay. that part with agriculture in the movie was so not true. the reason why the number of farmers is going down is because we are getting so productive with farming (new technology, pesticides, miracle seeds, etc). farmers have it bad now, because now they have to go up against the big agriculture cooprperations who have fields that are hundreds of miles. the US is the highest wheat and corn producer in the world. 5%of our population is involved with agriculture.if you are a farmers with your own farm, you are not better off than a lawyer.


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foysal8990 4 years ago

very informative news..........

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