Ancient Mayan Calendar

Guatemala Highlands, Maya Bowl with Images of Humans with Bundled Offerings, A.D. 600-900 Ceramic, Slip-painted ceramic, Height: 6 in. (15.24 cm) Gift of the Art Museum Council in honor of the museum’s twenty-fifth anniversary (M.90.168.10)
Guatemala Highlands, Maya Bowl with Images of Humans with Bundled Offerings, A.D. 600-900 Ceramic, Slip-painted ceramic, Height: 6 in. (15.24 cm) Gift of the Art Museum Council in honor of the museum’s twenty-fifth anniversary (M.90.168.10) | Source
Source

Mayan Calendar

According to National Geographic, it will not be necessary to worry about the end of the world as stated by believers in the Mayan Calendar found in Central America. The previously revealed calendar ended on December 21, 2012 giving rise to the belief that the world would end on that date. Much discussion has ensued as to whether the Mayans actually believed the world would end or whether they believed the Age would end and a new cycle of life would begin. Many television programs and historical documentaries have researched in depth the legend of the end of the world as understood by the Mayan Calendar.

A new Mayan calendar dating back to the ninth century; predating the more recent calendar by hundreds of years was found recently in Xultún, Guatemala. The new glyphs discovered in Guatemala were found on a wall in a recently uncovered work room where many calculations were found that date the calendar 7000 years into the future. This contradicts the 2012 Doomsday myth that has concerned many people. The Mayan civilization dates back more than 2000 years and is believed to have disappeared due to drought and starvation. The empire once covered Central America.


English: Mexico, Northern Campeche, Maya Tripod Plate with Mythological Bird, A.D. 550-700 Ceramic, Slip-painted ceramic, Diameter: 14 in. (35.6 cm) Gift of the Art Museum Council in honor of the museum’s twenty-fifth anniversary (M.90.168.13) Latin
English: Mexico, Northern Campeche, Maya Tripod Plate with Mythological Bird, A.D. 550-700 Ceramic, Slip-painted ceramic, Diameter: 14 in. (35.6 cm) Gift of the Art Museum Council in honor of the museum’s twenty-fifth anniversary (M.90.168.13) Latin | Source
Palenque ( Chiapas ) - Museo del sitio. Portrait of a Maya nobleman
Palenque ( Chiapas ) - Museo del sitio. Portrait of a Maya nobleman | Source
Palenque ( Chiapas ) - Museo del sitio. Portrait of a Maya nobleman
Palenque ( Chiapas ) - Museo del sitio. Portrait of a Maya nobleman | Source
Maya stucco head. Classic Period (300-900). Origin: Usumacinta region. Musées Royaux d'art et d'Histoire, Brussels (Belgium)
Maya stucco head. Classic Period (300-900). Origin: Usumacinta region. Musées Royaux d'art et d'Histoire, Brussels (Belgium) | Source

The Mayan Codices

The Mayan Codices were discovered in the 16th Century by the Spanish during the Spanish Conquest Of Yucatan. This took place in what is now known as the Zocalo in Mexico City, Mexico. The Mayan Calendar is part of the Mayan Codices which were deciphered by a man named Constantine Rafinesque who was a Turkish botanist and professor. Professor Rafinesque also deciphered the Dresden Codices in 1832.

The Maya codices are the hieroglyphic writings written in folding book form made from the inner bark of wild fig trees that date to the early pre-columbian era. The Maya were an intelligent and learned people who studied the stars and created their own written language. Most of the codices were destroyed by the Conquistadors and priests during the conquest. The previously known Maya codices did not contain the complete Mayan calendar, but one that ended on December 21, 2012.

However, weeks before December 2012 an archaeologist discovered a new Mayan calendar that went forward in time for 7000 years.

Many researchers believe this was because the calendar predicted a cataclysmic event that would happen on that date. This became so popular many books and movies were made depicting the events that would bring about the end of the world.

Stucco Portraits

The Maya were as interested in pictures and self portraits as we are today. While we have digital cameras, cell phones and smart phones to take our own images to document our lives, The Maya had to make do with an ingenious method of leaving their portrait for posterity. The wealthy noblemen created stucco masks which became portraits of their head. We have many such examples in museums today.

The Dresden Codex

The Dresden Codex is the most elaborate of the Mayan codices. It is kept in Sächsische Landesbibliothek (SLUB), the state library in Dresden, Germany. The Dresden codex is written about Mayan rituals and astrology. It is believed this codex was written just prior to the Spanish Conquest. There is information about the Venus cycles in this codex as well. These Venus cycles were an important part of Mayan life and ritual. The royal library of the court of Saxony purchased the Dresden codex after it was brought to Europe in Dresden in 1739.

New Mayan Calendar

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Smireles profile image

Smireles 4 years ago from Texas Author

Thank you so much, mecheshier, for your kind words. Could not write a word for so long. Then one morning I got up and everything snapped back into place. I am blessed. Thanks for the vote.


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mecheshier 4 years ago

Hi Smireles Glad to know that all is better. Hang in there. I took care of my father during his last illness. It is so hard. I do relate. Oh, great article! Thank you. Voted up


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Pamela99 4 years ago from United States

I am so sorry to hear that but I am glad you are better now. My 88 year old mother lives with me also, so I know it isn't always easy. I am not on here all the time, but I'm glad you're back


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Smireles 4 years ago from Texas Author

Thanks Pamela99. I lost my mother last summer and had been her caregiver during her final illness. But I am better now and back to work. Thanks for reading and commenting.


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Smireles 4 years ago from Texas Author

Thank you Sissy. Glad you enjoyed the article.


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Pamela99 4 years ago from United States

I was so glad to see that you had written a hub. This one is very interesting and the artifacts are beautiful. Up, interesting and beautiful. Welcome back! :)


Mary Kincade 4 years ago

Welcome Back !! Missed your writings !!Enjoyed the articles.


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Smireles 4 years ago from Texas Author

Thank you Tom and lumarie for your comments. This is my first hub in over a year and it is fun to be back writing.


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lumarie 4 years ago from Puerto Rico

Interesting!!


Tom Whitworth profile image

Tom Whitworth 4 years ago from Moundsville, WV

Smireles,

Beautiful artifacts. Thanks for an interesting hub.

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