Octopus or Devilfish; Animals that Adapt their Color to their Environment; Using Its Colour for Camouflage

Blue Ringed Octopus
Blue Ringed Octopus | Source
Blending In - http://www.explorerdirect.co.uk/
Blending In - http://www.explorerdirect.co.uk/ | Source
The siphon through which the octopus expels water as it breathes can be easily observed in this image.
The siphon through which the octopus expels water as it breathes can be easily observed in this image. | Source
Source

The octopus, also known as the Devilfish, is an amazing creature! It is able to adapt to its environment rendering itself invisible, or nearly invisible, to escape a predator or to capture its prey!

When I had my marine aquariums, I was often tempted to consider the introduction of an octopus into the underwater world I was creating. Despite my fascination with these wondrous creatures, I was always able to talk myself out of it. One good reason NOT to keep an octopus was that I valued some of the other creatures I had previously decided to keep. They would have made a very tasty, but expensive, meal for the eight armed mollusk. The advice typically given in keeping an octopus in an aquarium is to only keep octopuses in it, and then to only keep one of them. Not very exciting.



Answers.com defines an octopus as: “Any of numerous carnivorous marine mollusks of the genus Octopus or related genera, found worldwide. The octopus has a rounded soft body, eight arms with each bearing two rows of suckers, a large distinct head, and a strong beaklike mouth. Also called devilfish.”

Source

The octopus is a mollusk that has no external or internal skeleton. Because of this, they are able to squeeze through very small openings. So if keeping them in an aquarium, the aquarium must have a very tight fitting lid, or this extremely intelligent escape artist will be out of the aquarium whenever it chooses. And because of their strength, they sometimes use their legs to lift or push the cover right off the tank.

An octopus is able to live for short periods of time out of the water. Some aquarists have reported that their “octopus leaves its own tank, goes across the room, or to a tank beside it, entering that different tank, eats some of the fish or crustaceans, then travels back to its own tank.” That is amazing!

But there are also reports of the octopus drying up on the floor because they didn’t make it back in time! More of the scenario that I would expect!

A White Spotted Octopus hunting for molluscs and crabs in the sea grass at night in Aqaba Marine Park. www.redseaexplorer.com
A White Spotted Octopus hunting for molluscs and crabs in the sea grass at night in Aqaba Marine Park. www.redseaexplorer.com | Source
Octopus in Shell - The small Atlantic pygmy octopus is known to inhabit an empty clamshell.
Octopus in Shell - The small Atlantic pygmy octopus is known to inhabit an empty clamshell. | Source

Physical Characteristics

But enough about keeping them in aquariums, let’s talk about them in their natural environment – the ocean.

In addition to being a mollusk, the octopus is a cephalopod, meaning “head to foot” because the octopus’ feet are attached to its head, like the squid and cuttlefish. Octopuses are very short lived, living only 1-2 years, but most only live to about 6 months. There are approximately 300 species around the world.

The octopus ranges from 1 - 13 feet (0.3 - 4meters) in length. The Giant Pacific Octopus who lives in the coastal waters of British Columbia is the largest octopus in the world. The largest one ever captured weighed about 600 pounds, and its tentacles spanned 33 feet! However, most octopuses are much smaller, with the females rarely exceeding 55 pounds and the male usually averages less than 90 pounds.

The octopus has eight arms with suckers on the full length of them. They use these suckers to attach themselves to objects and to climb. The octopus uses its arms and suckers to catch and choke its prey. The suckers also serve as taste buds. The Giant Pacific Octopus has two rows of suckers on each arm for a total of 1,600 suckers!

Octopuses have a large head and well-developed eyes. However, they are deaf.

The body of the octopus looks like a bag. It moves as the octopus breathes filling with water as the octopus breathes in, and deflating as the octopus breathes out. When the octopus breathes the water out, the water is forced through a tube called a siphon. This expelling of air is what the octopus uses to propel itself.

An octopus has 3 hearts and light blue blood!


Eating Habits

Octopuses are omnivores, feeding on both animal and vegetable substances. Their mouth is hard like a beak allowing them to tear their food and to crack invertebrate shells to get to the meat inside. Its favorite foods are crabs, mollusks and crayfish.

Octopuses hunt using stealth. They camouflage to match their surroundings waiting for their prey to swim or crawl by. The octopus will then reach out and grab it, secreting a venomous saliva (a nerve poison) that stuns its prey. Octopus venom is poisonous and in some cases can be fatal to humans. Most octopuses are nocturnal creatures therefore do most of their hunting and feeding at nights.

Octopuses are preyed upon by sharks, dolphins, morays and conger eels.


Defensive Strategies

If an octopus becomes upset of frightened it may release ink to camouflage itself from potential predators. Watch this video to see how easy the ink made it for the octopus to disappear.



Another way they camouflage themselves is to adapt their color to that of their surroundings. Using a network of pigmented cells and specialized muscles, the common octopus can almost instantaneously match the colors, patterns, and even textures of its surroundings. It does this much the same way as a chameleon does to hide itself, but better, because an octopus can also change its shape.


Red Octopus Close-up
Red Octopus Close-up | Source


Octopuses are considered the most intelligent of all invertebrates. Experiments show they have short- and long-term memory, that they can distinguish shapes and patterns, and that they may even possess observational learning.

Octopuses are able to mate because one arm of the male is modified into a sexual organ that deposits sperm in the mantle cavity of the female. The eggs are attached to a rock, where the female guards them until they hatch. The average litter size is 80 young.

As they hatch, the young octopuses swim to the surface and float with the plankton for a month or two. After that time, they swim back to the sea floor. Male octopuses die within a few months of mating. Female octopuses die soon after their eggs hatch.

Octopuses are related to: chitons, abalone, snails, nudibranchs, sea hares, limpets, scallops, oysters, clams and mussels.




An octopus is able to take care of itself, as you will see what happens when it encounters a 5 foot shark, in the following video.


Other Sealife Articles by this Author:


Getting Lost - A very good example of how an octopus changes color to blend in with its environment. www.redseaexplorer.com
Getting Lost - A very good example of how an octopus changes color to blend in with its environment. www.redseaexplorer.com | Source

How to Prepare, Cook and Eat Octopus

Several comments have discussed the issue of preparing, cooking and eating octopus. If you are interested in this topic, visit this article: How to Prepare, Cook and Eat Octopus.

More by this Author


Comments: "Octopus or Devilfish; Animals that Adapt their Color to their Environment; Camouflage using Its Colour" 92 comments

Cloverleaf profile image

Cloverleaf 5 years ago from Calgary, AB, Canada

The Caribbean Reef Octopus is quite beautiful, I have seen them many times while snorkeling in shallow water around Grand Cayman. They move gracefully and change colors a lot. They usually have a "buddy fish" swimming around with them - it's like the Odd Couple!

Cloverleaf.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

cloverleaf - I bet it is beautiful. I have not been blessed to see an octopus in the wild and being able to swim freely. An aquarium is somewhat confining. I can only imagine. Thank you for stopping by and sharing your wonderful experience.


lundmusik profile image

lundmusik 5 years ago from Tucson AZ

wow,, I shared this on facebook.. fantastic pictures, great info,, pretty hub!!!!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

lundmusik - thank you so much. I am tickled that you found it nice enough to want to share. I am very happy that you enjoyed it. Thank you!


tlmcgaa70 profile image

tlmcgaa70 5 years ago from south dakota, usa

another awesome hub! i got to see a wild baby octopus down in rocky point mexico. these people had caught it and were going to take it home and put it in their aquarium. it was tiny and pink and cuter than a button. thanks for the great info and video experience.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

tlmcgaa70 - thanks for the compliments. I hope if they got it home they knew what they were getting into. In addition to some of the drawbacks that I mentioned to keeping them in an aquarium is how large they can get! There many more that I did not even want to get into in this hub. But they certainly can be a challenge. Maybe some day I'll see one in the wild. Thanks for sharing your experience. For now, I will have to experience it through your eyes.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 5 years ago from America

Great hub loved reading about the Octopus.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

moonlake - so glad you enjoyed it. And thanks for stopping by!


amazingchild profile image

amazingchild 5 years ago from Phoenix, AZ

What a wealth of information! I had no idea that an octopus could be strong enough to lift a lid off an aquarium. Wow!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

amazingchild-that's right. Their body is mostly all muscle. Since they don't have any bones, all their support and movements occur because of their muscular strength. Thanks for stopping by.


adrienne2 profile image

adrienne2 5 years ago from Atlanta

Homestead you have done it again other beautiful hub! Great pictures and wonderfully written article. Thank u for sharing.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

adrienne2 - thank you for your kind words. I really do find these creatures facinating. And the videos that I was able to go with this one I really enjoyed. Thank u for stopping by!


jami l. pereira 5 years ago

I Loved this Hub ! AND i voted up all the way across the board , even funny , as the trip to the next aquarium was funny and amazing ..not so funny for the other occupant ,but you know what i mean :) have a wonderful evening:)


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

jami l. pereira - I am glad that you enjoyed this hub. I hope you have a great week and I'm sure I'll be seeing you around. Thanks for stopping by.


carriethomson profile image

carriethomson 5 years ago from United Kingdom

Hi!! The hub is just great and the octopus is such a fascinating creature :)) loved the way it camouflaged. Superb and vote up!!

Carrie


Gypsy Willow profile image

Gypsy Willow 5 years ago from Lake Tahoe Nevada USA , Wales UK and Taupo New Zealand

What a great hub! i thoroughly enjoyed it. I saw a BBC film about them recently showing how intelligent they are. Thanks for the excellent education.


bethperry profile image

bethperry 5 years ago from Tennesee

What is it about octopuses I find so adorable? I think the only thing about them I don't like is their taste.

Loved this article, full of cool facts!


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

This is one of my favorite of all the sea creatures... they are so intelligent and clever. A great photo selection here too HSB and I love how you present your information... its RICH. Voted up and sharing.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

carriethomson - wasn't that a great video showing how they camouflaged. I loved it! Thank you so much for stopping by and for commenting!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Gypsy Willow - from what I been able to read and watch on TV, they are very intelligent. They are so unique and unusual also. I am glad that you enjoyed the read. Thanks for stopping by!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

bethperry - I did not know that you could eat them! Squid is called calamari. What is octopus called?

There is something about the octopus - maybe it's their intelligence that intrigues us, I don't know. Thanks for stopping by! I hope you answer my question.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - I am pleased that you enjoyed it. They are really intelligent, which is displayed quite well in their behavior of seeing "food" in another tank and crawling out of their tank, getting the "food" and then crawling back. It's amazing that they just didn't stay in the tank where the "food" was. Why bother going back, except to confuse their owners about the lose of fish in the other tank, or to have some type of homing instinct. It's really quite fascinating!


PDXKaraokeGuy profile image

PDXKaraokeGuy 5 years ago from Portland, Oregon

always found octopi to be very fascinating and, once again learned a lot of new information here. Do you have any idea why they have such short lifespans?


Ahydz profile image

Ahydz 5 years ago from Philippines

Cool photos of this amazing creatures! :)

Hmm...this is the best prey my father used to dive back then. His favorite seafood. Maybe it's more on the challenge he gets in chasing them (or being chase by them) rather than the taste. I ate dried version of this one and din't like it. But I just found them beautiful.


dungeonraider profile image

dungeonraider 5 years ago from United States

Here there be monsters!

I think you do a great job here for our misunderstood sea friends - they are awesomely intelligent and curious. Voted interesting.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

PDXKaraokeGuy - I agree with you that the octopus is a very fascinating creature. I do not know why its lifespan is short, but then I don't know why humans live as long as we do. It is because it is. I don't understand why parrots can outlive humans, but they can. What can I say?

Maybe someone will come along and be able to answer this question for us.

Thanks for stopping by and making me have to think a little harder today!


PDXKaraokeGuy profile image

PDXKaraokeGuy 5 years ago from Portland, Oregon

perhaps. Do they generally die of natural causes or is that the average lifespan when you take predators into account?


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Ahydz - maybe you know the answer to an earlier question - squid is called calamari, what is octopus called when it is cooked?

I found what you said about your father chasing and being chased to be amusing!

Thanks for stopping by!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

dungeonraider - I am really pleased that you enjoyed the article. They are really wonderful creatures. They are interesting.Thanks for stopping by!


Ahydz profile image

Ahydz 5 years ago from Philippines

I don't know exactly what's it called...maybe "dried octopus"...


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Ahydz - I was not able to find recipes for dried octopus. I have now included many different ways to prepare octopus in the above article.

Thanks for stopping by!


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

not many things eat them... there is a youtube video of one killing a 5 foot shark...


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - I have now included the video that you mentioned. Thanks for the info. And thanks for visitin'!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

PDXKaraokeGuy - After the response from davenmidtown, I included the video that he mentioned. Obviously very little causes an adult octopus to meet an untimely death.

Thanks so much!


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

mmm HSB you should find the one of the octopus escaping from its tank...


PDXKaraokeGuy profile image

PDXKaraokeGuy 5 years ago from Portland, Oregon

i think it's called "tasty"


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Sorry, davenmidtown. I looked for some time and did not find a video that got my seal of approval. But if I run across one I will be sure to add it.

Thanks so much!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

PDXKaraokeGuy - have you eaten octopus before? I have added several videos that show how to eat and prepare octopus. One of the videos, they actually eat them alive! Yuck!


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

It may be gone now... it was old... it was a video of an octopus in a lab and at night it would open is tank, go across the lab floor, get in the other fish tank, eat all of the fish and then crawl out, close the lid and go back to its tank, get in and then close its own lid.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - that's what I was looking for. That would have gotten my seal of approval. I viewed several, but none like that. Too bad! That would have been perfect!

Thanks for stopping by and making me want something I can't have! Darn!


Ahydz profile image

Ahydz 5 years ago from Philippines

Oh! Homesteadbound, I guess only in our country you can find dried octopus, dried squid, and that also goes with dried salted and non-slated fish, dried mangoes, dried pineapple...etc..


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Ahydz - I bet if I found a market that specialized in food from the Philippines that it would probably be there. It is probably a cultural food, because I would have a hard time eating an octopus. But I also have never had sushi. I don't like raw oysters either. I don't like anything that tastes fishy. I know stores where I can get the dried fruits you mentioned and love them. Thanks for sharing.


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

I have eaten octopus... its sweeter then calamari...


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - That's interesting. I would not have thought anything that was essentially muscle and from a marine environment would be described as tasting sweet.

I have seen small octopus cooked up at Chinese buffets, but I was never that adventurous. Can't even say that I was tempted.

I do however, like calamari, but maybe I didn't know what I was eating before I ate it the first time.


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

The worse thing that I have ever eaten... which turned out to be quite good... were soft shelled crabs... they look like spiders when they are all fried up.... but MMM once I tried them I just love them...but trust me I thought about shopping for shoes while eating them.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - As bad as I hate spiders, I probably would have never made it past that thought, and I'd have been using my shoes to kill something - possibly some spider looking crabs - just to assure myself that they were dead and to help them not look like spiders anymore. YUK!

I have never eaten these things, but... when they are eating the live eels, monkey brains, and scarab beetles on the Indiana Jones movies, that was way over the edge for me, and almost too ... to even think about.

But that's what I was talking about - it's a culture thing. I'm sure there are things that I eat that would gross other cultures out.


Ahydz profile image

Ahydz 5 years ago from Philippines

I have never eaten sushi or raw oysters. I guess we're on the same page when it comes to that HSB. hahaha! I never really like them. Especially that I saw a picture of an Asian man with his brain being infested with white crawling maggots. It's said that through out his existence, he has eaten sushi on a daily bases. Yuck! I guess you can still view the photo on google but It's super gross.

If there's one cultural food I ate, it was rice field frogs??? That was when I was still a toddler. I don't think I can still eat frogs now that I know what gross means. hahaha!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Ahydz - that does sound nasty - maggots on the brain!?! Are you saying that this was caused by eating sushi? You might want to check out http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/bl-brainworm... - this is considered to be an urban legend.

I did find that you can get anisakiasis from eating sushi at: www.straightdope.com/columns/read/399/can-you-get-worms-from-eating-sushi.

I do know people who catch and eat fried frog legs.

Thanks for adding richness to these comments by your comments.


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

Actually that is true... parasites can infest the brain when eating under-cooked pork, fish, or raw shellfish.


PDXKaraokeGuy profile image

PDXKaraokeGuy 5 years ago from Portland, Oregon

never had soft shell crabs. looks like maybe I should?


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - I was specifically addressing the maggots that were mentioned and that has been found to have been an urban legend. However, as I stated, a person could come down with anisakiasis, which are small worms that can cause infections. Thank you for the clarification. Trichonosis is the worm that can be contacted by eating undercooked pork.

Thanks for your comment and for stopping by!


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

just various forms of different bugs... thankfully... spiders do not pupate!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

PDXKaraokeGuy - i like crab meat, but anything that looks like fried spiders I will have to pass on.

Have fun! Hope you enjoy your spider crabs! ewwwww!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - why do you say that? What do spiders have to do with octopuses?


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

the worms... HSB... you will never get worms in your brain from eating spiders because they do not pupate....


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - sorry I thought we were talking about octopuses, not spiders! But there is no telling what would happen if you ate raw spiders ... I'm really trying not to think about it.


Ahydz profile image

Ahydz 5 years ago from Philippines

HSB and Davidmidtown are just so funny arguing about spider crabs.. hahaha!

HSB, Thank you for clarifying my worm issue. hahaha! I've read what you've suggested. I never believe at first about it, but whether true or not, the thought of having live parasites in my brain is just so unthinkable. The only raw thing I am fond of eating is Ceviche with lots and lots of spices to make sure the fish is cooked with it.


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

Ahydz: HSB is a natural dancer... all you have to say is look... there is a spider and she starts Tap Tapping, Tapping...


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Ahydz - davenmidtown and I do chide each other a bit. You will see it happening on many of our hubs. Just enjoy the friendly banter! Because it is friendly ... (biting my nails) at least I think it is ...

Did you know that maggots are used as a medical treatment ... eating the dead tissue on people who have gangrene? The maggots do not eat the living tissue, only the dead tissue. That is pretty amazing.

I like ceviche also. In fact I haven't had it in a while, maybe even a couple years, and I think it's time. Looking forward to it. It's the lemon and lime juice that cooks the seafood in ceviche.

Have a great weekend!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - ssshhhh! You're giving away my secrets!


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

I did not even mention Newton's Balls!


Ahydz profile image

Ahydz 5 years ago from Philippines

You're right about the maggot thing. I've seen on TV about maggots eating dead tissue on a mans leg with diabetes. Yup, I guess that's what I've seen long time ago.

You too have a great week end!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - that's a whole different hub still waiting on your reply. You are going to have to wonder over there for a while. That hub is feeling neglected!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Ahydz - I imagine that you also saw the doctored up picture for the maggots on the brain that you mentioned much earlier. Thanks for stopping by!


Ahydz profile image

Ahydz 5 years ago from Philippines

You got it right HSB. And I can't help stopping by at your hubs. It's fun here.

Davenmidtown -- I guess you were a naughty boy back then. It shows here now. Hahaha! (peace)


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Ahydz - davenmidtown just can't help himself. Sometimes the naughty in him just oozes out!


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

I am a perfect angel...

read this hub by HSB it talks about newtons balls... honestly...

http://hubpages.com/games-hobbies/Magnetic-Fun-Mag...


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - perfect angel ... I just can't touch that one - even with a ten foot pole!

That hub is still waiting for your lovin' touch!


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

Which hub?


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

The very one you referenced above. Santa will be bringing you the Newton's Balls!!!


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

I'd rather have his brain


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

If you don't stop it, people are going to quit thinking you are naughty, and will know it to be a fact!


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

I never said what kind of angel... you people... just assumed...


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

What are you talking about? That zinger flew too high for me to grab hold of it!


PDXKaraokeGuy profile image

PDXKaraokeGuy 5 years ago from Portland, Oregon

ha. U said "balls"


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

I think I was tricked. You have to go to my magnet hub for the rest of the story, and I'm going to go hurt a fellow hubber who will go unmentioned but whose name begins with D and ends with avenmidtown.


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

hahahahahahahahahahahahhaah this is of course a euphemism....


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

You best stop laughing and start running!


Ahydz profile image

Ahydz 5 years ago from Philippines

It shows here that HSB and davenmidtown have aged gracefully. I like that you guys have a great sense of humor.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Ahydz - you do know that this comment will probably get him going again. He likes to stir things up. But he could be hiding out ... somewhere ... afraid that he will get exactly what he deserves.

But yes, we do like to have a little fun!


Kris Heeter profile image

Kris Heeter 5 years ago from Indiana

This hub tugs at my biologist's heart - I love marine life. There's nothing more beautiful than seeing these in the wild. Makes me want to go diving again (haven't been in years)!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Kris Heeter - I love creatures of the sea myself. They are so fascinating and beautiful. It's an environment that is so foreign to those of us who are relegated to live on dry ground. Thanks for stopping by!


PDXKaraokeGuy profile image

PDXKaraokeGuy 5 years ago from Portland, Oregon

I know it's a different medium but I remember watching a special on The Little Mermaid and how difficult that film was for the animators because the water was always moving and all the features of the characters would be moving as well, especially the hair. i find the ocean fascinating. That's why i want to be buried at sea and, hopefully, eating by a shark.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

PDXKaraokeGuy - animation has certainly changed from when it was hand drawn and then slight movements were drawn and re-drawn. That was such a time intensive process.

Being buried at sea and eaten by sharks, humm... interesting.

Thanks for stopping by.


PDXKaraokeGuy profile image

PDXKaraokeGuy 4 years ago from Portland, Oregon

well, if i'm dead, i may as well feed sharks


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 4 years ago from Texas Author

PDXKaraokeGuy - how does your wife feel about that? I don't think I would like to know that I was feeding my husband to the sharks. I just don't know ....


PDXKaraokeGuy profile image

PDXKaraokeGuy 4 years ago from Portland, Oregon

welll, i think she'll be sad enough to see my demise...


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 4 years ago from Texas Author

Exactly ... and then the thought of your body being torn to shreds by sharks ... just don't know. I just don't think I could do that to my husband. But it is an interesting concept. We want to be cremated so that we don't take up space anywhere ... it is basically the same thing.


PDXKaraokeGuy profile image

PDXKaraokeGuy 4 years ago from Portland, Oregon

i'm glad to hear you wouldn't want that to happen to your husband :-)


alocsin profile image

alocsin 4 years ago from Orange County, CA

This is one of my favorite animals, so thanks for highlighting them, though the last section was not the most pleasant surprise ;) Voting this Up and Interesting.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 4 years ago from Texas Author

alocsin - I added the last section because someone asked me to, but after your comment and thinking about it, I believe that I will be separating the two. Thanks so much for bringing it to my attention.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 4 years ago from Texas Author

alocsin - I have eliminated the ending so that you and others will not be so unpleasantly surprised. That will be another hub in the future. Thanks again for letting me know and giving me input on how to improve the hub!

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