Henry Ⅱ and the Fair Rosamund: a most mysterious mistress

The love story of Rosamund and Henry Ⅱ

Fair Rosamund as portrayed by John William Waterhouse, an artist deeply influenced by the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.
Fair Rosamund as portrayed by John William Waterhouse, an artist deeply influenced by the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. | Source

Rosamund Clifford: subject of myth and legend

Rosamund Clifford has always been an enigma and as such she has attracted a great deal of interest, and whole lot more controversy, from writers, poets and artists down through the ages.

So, was she just a casual 'loose woman' or was she a woman wronged on a big scale?

The Rose of the World.

Rosamund was born sometime before 1150, one of the six children born to Walter de Clifford and his wife, Margaret. Her father was one of the marcher lords, a knightly title which denoted that he was entrusted by the king to guard extensive tracts of land on the Welsh/English border.

At that time Wales was a wild country in constant rebellion against the English king as it struggled to free itself from beneath the heel of the armoured boot of the English. The king at this time was Henry Ⅱ, a man of limitless energy and fiery nature.

Rosamund herself grew up to have the necessary requisite for all mistresses everywhere, great beauty and seems to have attracted two famous epithets, The Fair Rosamund and Rosa Mundi, Latin for Rose of the World.

Gardeners will recognise that this is also the name of a rose which has a delicate pink and white appearance but it is unknown whether or not this old rose was contemporary with Rosamund. It is tantalising to think that it may have been and that someone, perhaps Henry, teasingly nicknamed her after the rose as she blushed before him.

Little is known of what sort of person Rosamund was and because of this artists and poets have usually shown her as the victim in her long term relationship with Henry and her unenviable position as 'the other woman' to his queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine.

The much-decayed ruins of Rosamund's home, Clifford Castle in the Wye Valley in Herefordshire, England.
The much-decayed ruins of Rosamund's home, Clifford Castle in the Wye Valley in Herefordshire, England. | Source
An initial study of Fanny Cornforth by Dante Gabriel Rossetti for his painting of Fair Rosamund.
An initial study of Fanny Cornforth by Dante Gabriel Rossetti for his painting of Fair Rosamund. | Source
The finished painting by Rossetti ...
The finished painting by Rossetti ... | Source
A less glamourous interpretation of Rosamund in her bower by William Bell Scott
A less glamourous interpretation of Rosamund in her bower by William Bell Scott | Source
Despite being the king of England, Henry has not captured the popular imagination so much as the beautiful but doomed Rosamund. He has inspired no portraits ...
Despite being the king of England, Henry has not captured the popular imagination so much as the beautiful but doomed Rosamund. He has inspired no portraits ... | Source
Fair Rosamund's Well. All that remains of the old palace of Woodstock which was torn down in 1704 to make way for the building of Blenheim Palace.
Fair Rosamund's Well. All that remains of the old palace of Woodstock which was torn down in 1704 to make way for the building of Blenheim Palace. | Source
Pickering Castle, North Yorkshire. One of the towers in this castle is called Rosamund's Tower. As it was not built during Henry Ⅱ's reign its name remains a mystery.
Pickering Castle, North Yorkshire. One of the towers in this castle is called Rosamund's Tower. As it was not built during Henry Ⅱ's reign its name remains a mystery. | Source

Henry Ⅱ, Plantagenet king of England.

Henry had had a hard battle to obtain the crown of England, having continually tried to wrest the crown from his mother's cousin, Stephen, who had seized power on the death of Henry Ⅰ. Finally, an uneasy truce was reached when Stephen's only son, Eustace, died.

Needing an heir Stephen finally named Henry and then died, very obligingly, only a year later. Despite the suspicious timing it would seem that nobody voiced any thoughts of any skulduggery at the time. Unless they kept their thoughts to themselves.

Henry Plantagenet was also know as Henry Curtmantle (presumably as a result of wearing a short cloak) and also Henry FitzEmpress, (trans. son of the Empress) after a title held by his mother Matilda.

Despite being fairly short and stocky with red hair and freckles it is thought he was regarded as an attractive looking man. He was said to have possessed a very piercing stare, a peculiar characteristic which has made its way down to us through the passage of almost a thousand years.

HIs short stature may have been attributable to his bowed legs, the obvious result of having lived most of his young life in the saddle, honing his warfare skills. He was a formidable warrior and regained large swathes of France that had been English territory during the reign of his grandfather, Henry I.

Henry exuded power and confidence and his nature was fierce and domineering, the sort of qualities necessary to a king of England of the time. Not the sort of person one would like to cross, as Thomas à Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, found out to his cost. Henry's fiery outburst wanting rid of Thomas set in motion the knights who brutally murdered him in Canterbury Cathedral.

Famous for being somewhat rough and ready, even shabby in his dress, Henry seemed to have little time for the vanities of this world. Leading from the front and dressed as a common soldier must have endeared him greatly to his troops.

Despite his intimidating personality Henry was obviously clever. He understood many languages although he only used Latin and French himself as these were the languages of the court and nobility.

He was also an inveterate womaniser and had many mistresses in his life but only Rosamund and Annabel de Balliol became long term loves. This would seem to prove that he was capable of sustaining love, for some women at least.

A lasting love affair.

It is thought Henry may first have met Rosamund in 1163. Rhys ap Gruffydd was leading another rebellion in Wales and Henry was on his way to crush it. It is likely that he would use the route that passed by Rosamund's home, Clifford Castle, and he may even have commandeered a night's lodging for himself and his men. It would have been his right as Walter de Clifford's liege lord.

Was it also his right, one wonders, to take advantage of one of his host's daughters? He was the king, so most likely refusal was not an option. Henry was a well-known seducer of women, how could Walter de Clifford have allowed any of his daughters to be seen by him?

Clifford was either incredibly trusting or, more likely, willing to use whichever daughter caught the king's eye as a pawn in a game to procure yet more power and more land.

So Rosamund caught Henry's eye and the affair began. To his credit it would also appear that he loved her steadfastly, although possibly not exclusively, until she entered a nunnery in 1176. What we can never know was whether Rosamund loved Henry in return.

An unquiet mind?

She died not long after she had entered the nunnery at Godstow in Oxfordshire and we can only speculate on what prompted her to go into such a place. Did she have an overwhelming guilt at the adulterous nature of her affair with the king and if so, why had it taken her thirteen years to get to that state?

It seems more believable that she was already ill when she retired from her role as royal concubine. Her choice of a nunnery could be revealing. Nunneries of the time had infirmaries for the care of the sick, usually their own sisters, and it would have been the place to be both nursed for a physical ailment ... and a spiritual one.

She was buried in the choir of the convent church and her tomb took pride of place before the high altar. It was jointly paid for by her own family and, most tellingly, by Henry. There was also money set aside to pay the nuns to take care of it. These are not exactly the acts of a man who has lightly discarded a mistress.

Enter the queen: Eleanor of Aquitaine

The other player in this historic ménage à trois was Queen Eleanor, Henry's wife. A strong, capable woman she could have been, quite possibly, a dangerous rival for Henry's affections, if any of the legends have a grain of truth in them.

One famous legend has it that Henry built a bower in the centre of a labyrinth at Woodstock in Oxfordshire to hide and protect Rosamund. However by following a silken thread that had become unwound from Rosamund's sewing box, Eleanor found her way in and offered Rosamund the choice of a dagger or poison with which to commit suicide. It is said Rosamund chose poison and so died.

Obviously this story is one of the more fanciful fabrications that surround Rosamund.

A marriage of convenience.

Eleanor of Aquitaine and Henry Ⅱ had the sort of marriage that was commonplace for their status. They allied for the usual dynastic reasons of land and power and as such romantic love rarely intruded on what was in all senses of the word, a business contract.

Part of Eleanor's contract was to produce heirs for the English throne and the many dukedoms their combined lands required. This she did in abundance providing Henry with five sons and three daughters and their large and turbulent family became the stuff of legends, including as it did the crusader king, Richard the Lionheart and King John, who signed the Magna Carta.

The Lion in Winter - 2003 - Glenn Close as Eleanor

Was Eleanor a woman spurned?

Did Eleanor view Rosamund as a threat, a rival? Did she resent the love Henry evidently bore for Rosamund? It could be argued that as theirs was a political marriage and as she was well used to Henry's liaison's d'amour by the time Rosamund appeared Eleanor had no particular feelings at all about the issue. It was, and still is, usual for powerful men to have mistresses.

There are stories that she too took lovers. She was a beautiful and spirited woman, she was often alone in her castle in Aquitaine and she was a woman who, like Henry, did not feel it necessary to play by the rules. But eventually even she appears to have had enough of Henry, his temper and his moods, his mistresses and his illegitimate children, who perhaps presented some sort of threat to her own.

Her own sons were grown and as warlike as their father and so she supported Young Henry, their eldest son, in a revolt against his father. The revolt failed and Eleanor was imprisoned for her support of it. She was only released on the death of Henry in 1189 by her son Richard, when he took his deceased father's place as the king of England.

Eleanor was imprisoned in 1173, the year the revolt started. Rosamund did not die until 1176. A fact that would seem to further disprove the story that Eleanor forced suicide on Rosamund.

So just why was Henry so loyal to Rosamund?

The very fact that Rosamund is such an unknown personality must surely be due to her nature which must have had a sort of retiring quality to it. Such a lack of detail could mean that she was simply a gentle, pliant, even loving woman content to remain hidden. This could explain why Henry had such a long lasting affection for her. She may well have been a much-needed antidote to the energetic, tumultuous and ultimately scheming Eleanor.

Perhaps with her Henry found the peace and calmness that he needed. Perhaps she became his sanctuary from the constant turmoil that was his life.

Postscript.

Rosamund's tomb was removed from the nunnery church at Godstow and placed in the graveyard on the express orders of the zealous Bishop of Lincoln, who was outraged that the 'harlot' had been buried in the church. (Notably that this was in 1191, two years after Henry's death).

The tomb was mostly destroyed during Henry Ⅷ's dramatic purge of Catholicism during the Dissolution but one of its Latin inscriptions was still partly legible in 1599 and it read:

Let them adore ... and we pray that rest be given to you, Rosamund.

Was this inscription Henry's idea? Does it hint at her unquiet conscience as a king's mistress?Had she begged to be released from her position so that she could enter a nunnery and try to redeem her immortal soul? We will never know ...

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Comments 34 comments

diogenes profile image

diogenes 4 years ago from UK and Mexico

Interesting article. Most of these scum were womenisers or homosexuals. That they stayed with one, superficially, was more to do with political expediency. It was considered an honor for a lesser mortal of the court to have his wife or daughter serviced by the king. We saw this right up to today as Charles conducted an affair with Camilla right under her husband's nose; he then readily consented to her divorce.

It's the old game of money power and sex. The long line of bastards who have ruled Britain played it like all in Europe.

Women so readily fall for the sexuality of power and postion.

Bob


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 4 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

Many thanks for your comment, Bob, though not so sure about your last line ...

Agreed some women do fall for power, notably poor Marilyn Monroe but today men are just a likely to be told to 'naff orf' as the Princess Royal once so memorably put it.

But things were more difficult for women in history. Usually seen as the goods and chattels of their conniving families they could hardly refuse the King if he wanted them as there would have been dire consequences, with the possibility of Death being one of them. An unenviable position if you happened to take Henry the Eighth's fancy! Eeuugh!

Sadly there are still a lot of men today who have the same overweening sense of entitlement, for instance, ex-IMF chief, Dominic Straus-Kahn.


Charlotte B Plum profile image

Charlotte B Plum 4 years ago

Wow this was very fascinating. I felt almost like I were watching a movie! Enjoy your writing a lot!


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 4 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

Hi Charlotte ... thanks for stopping by to leave your kind comment!

I must admit I love history and spend probably too much time reinventing the lives of historic characters in my head.

Trying to work out what makes people do what they do has an especial fascination for me.


Jools99 profile image

Jools99 4 years ago from North-East UK

Angie, a very interesting hub. I had no idea that Henry had what sounds like a real relationship with Rosmanund (albeit not exclusive - quelle surprise!); the big story has always concentrated on Eleanor of Aquitaine and the power she seemed to be able to wield over Henry but of course, we have gotten the stories passed down through the centuries and nobody can ever know the actual facts, fascinating nonetheless. Voted up and shared - I do love a good historical hub :o)


brewskitimeguy profile image

brewskitimeguy 4 years ago from Maine

I can tell that you truly enjoy history and all its intricacies. I enjoyed reading


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 4 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

@Jools ... thanks for pitching up here. I guess we'll never know the real story as in whether of not he kept her in one place such as Woodstock or whether she travelled with him. As he always seemed to be fighting somewhere she really could have been quite neglected. My gut feeling is though that the tomb thing suggests she was something more to him than just an 'easy lay'.

Many thanks for the vote up and share. I really appreciate that.

@brewskitimeguy - hi! Again, many thanks to you for taking the time to comment. History is definitely a subject close to my heart ... I believe we really can learn from the past. In this case, don't become a king's mistress :)


europewalker profile image

europewalker 4 years ago

Interesting hub. I enjoy reading this type of history. Well done.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 4 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

Angie, my friend, I always have a thrill when I see that you have posted a hub. Your impeccable writing leaves nothing to be desired, either in eloquence, fascinating content or an underpinning of humour and delicious storytelling.

Loved it, and of course, I am rushing up to push some buttons.

Ian


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 4 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

europewalker ... thanks for enjoying my hub. These history hubs take some pulling together ... but it keeps me off the streets.


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 4 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

Hello TL, dearheart - I always, always look forward to your kind comments. A little flattery is balm to an old bat's soul, doncha know?

And of course as hopeless romantics we are both suckers for a sad love story.

Mwah!


writeronline 4 years ago

Before I read this, I couldn't even spell Rosamund.

TBH, Angie, if the piece didn't have you as the author, I probably would have happily gone comfortably on in the absence of that knowledge. But, as usual with your stuff, once I began to read...well, you know how that goes.

I love your line, "Henry exuded power and confidence and his nature was fierce and domineering, the sort of qualities necessary to a king of England....", and couldn't help wondering how a future writer such as yourself would look back on the attributes of the current heir to the throne, who may yet make it...

Probably something like, "Prince Whatsisname: An embarrasingly introverted individual, he enjoyed a special relationship with plants, which presented less of a challenge than those at which he failed, with the three women who ruled his life, as he waited patiently for his turn to rule the land. Avoiding scandal by avoiding responsibility for all but spending his allotted allowance from the public purse, and dutifully seeding at least one future heir."

Anyway, love your work, Angie. Who knew learning could be so enjoyable?


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 4 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

Bless you WOL for your kind comments as usual. Deeply flattering ... and I adore flattery!

But I think I would surprise you with comments about Charles. I am very much on his side. He comes from a highly dysfunctional family with an overbearing father and a cool and distant mother.

Protocol dictated he marry an airhead (don't get me wrong she was a warm and loving mother but she was too young and shallow for him). He would have married Camilla straight off if he had been allowed. I think the loyal love he has always carried for her is exemplary and I'm glad they are together at last. (People always make the mistake of putting beauty above everything else, I find).

He lives mainly off the Duchy of Cornwall which brings in his income and which he supports wholeheartedly. I don't care if he talks to his plants ... he is a gardener like me ... I do it too. He is in an invidious position as the Queen is a control freak (please re-direct all post to the Tower of London) but he has set up so many initiatives to help young people get a start in life and he works tirelessly on their behalf. It's a role he has carved out for himself rather than just going around looking at factories and offering limp handshakes.

There ... now wasn't that a surprise! :) x


writeronline 4 years ago

Consider me gobsmacked! Maybe all he needs is a new press secretary. I understand about protocol et al, but if his love for Camilla is so loyal, could he not have done a Mrs Simpson with her? If true love trumps beauty (with which I wholeheartedly agree), ought it not to be equally capable of overcoming a desire to hold onto one's position, and privilege? (Just an idle thought...)

BTW, no disagreement about plants, some of the nicest living things on the planet, and in my experience, quite responsive to a little vocal encouragement in the early stages, preferably accompanied by a refreshing evening drink (for the plant, Angie, for the plant..).

Cheers, and backatcha with the x.


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 4 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

Re: your idle thought. Charles would have been unable to do an Edward 8th (Edward 8th was a spoilt brat and not very bright at that, poor soul, so he abdicated for his own reasons. It's now believed that Mrs S. lived to regret it).

Charles has been, for most of his life, totally bullied and crushed by his father, at least.

Intense pressure, a sense of duty drilled into him by his mother and the emotional blackmail levied by his beloved grannie, who had a pathological hatred of Edward and Mrs S. because the abdication made her husband have to take the throne (which he really did not want to do). How could a person as gentle as Charles stood up to such intense family pressure? How could he not do the right thing and marry a virgin? Jeeze, how outmoded was that?

You only have to look at his cheery, smiley face nowadays to see how happy he is. He chuckles all the time in interviews and really seems to focus intently on what us 'little people' are saying to him when we speak. He is now full of fun and I think he would make a great king. The politicians would hate it of course ... he tends to roll up his sleeves and 'interfere' as they see it. And that has to be a good thing.

Re: plants - I'm defo, with you on that one. Some of the nicest people I know. The plants and I often have a sundowner, I have wine, they have water because they're underage.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 4 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

Angie, how refreshing to read your thoughts on the Prince of Wales (and OK, Duke of Cornwall, for your sake). I don’t like the man, but I can remember when I watched him at the Investiture at Caernarfon Castle, and my goodness he came over well. I know he was very young for a man of that time... really, just a boy.

(Think of a twenty-year old now: Really grown up men doing really grown up things like burning and looting and... enough of that).

Back to Charles. He really was dedicating his life to the Crown, the Country, the Commonwealth. The guy was openly in tears, and I applaud him for that.

So what happened? I don’t know if many people would be able to show any individuality with a father like the awful Phil the Greek. Loathsome man; as arrogant, meddling, racist and nasty as his uncle, Louis Mountbatten. There was a manipulative and insidious, vain person if ever there was one.

He and the dreadful Queen Elizabeth, mother to our present Monarch were a real pair. She hated David for abdicating and marrying Wallis; he. Lord Louis, apparently never got over his dynastic aspirations when he was informed that Philip and Elizabeth, after the wedding, were not to be Mountbattens, but retain the name Windsor.

Poor Charles, I feel sorry for him, but I feel he has some unattractive qualities, most amusing, so unimportant, among them being his obsequiousness towards a certain type of entertainer; Stephen Fry, that great name dropper, must bask continuously in his arse licking. Wasn’t it Spike Milligan who called him “a little grovelling bastard”? Milligan should have taken up residence in the Tower a long time before you, Angie.

By serendipity, many years ago, I was at Saint Thomas’ Hospital, in a little ward of only four beds. There as a member of the Royal Household in there ay t the same time... not in my bed, may I hasten to add, but in his own. It sounds terribly Posh that I should be in a room with a “member of the Royal Household”, but the guy was a gardener at Windsor Castle

Obviously, when I knew of this, we struck up a conversation regarding Him and Her. This was in the time when no one really knew what was or wasn’t going on between the,

I adored and still do (!), the Princess of Wales, and was most hurt and surprised when the gardener chap told me that in his estimation, and nearly all the staff, that she was a very clever and manipulative woman. He agreed that she might not have been the brightest, but he said that she was incredibly clever, but poorly advised... and this was years ago before all the leaked reports.

He said that he most frequently saw the members of the Royal Family on Sundays after Chapel, when they would walk together back to the main building for lunch. He said that the whole group would be together and that contrary to what we have heard, the Queen is inordinately fond of children and that if there were a child around either staff, guest or Royal, she would make a great fuss of her or him.

But this, also, is a woman who greeted her child when she returned to the UK from some trip to Foreign or one of those other countries; but the sad thing is that she expected it and that he also thought it was the thing to do.

But apparently, Charles would be a distance away from the others, and this guy said he kept up a constant conversation with himself, and only in quiet tones. And he assured me that, like his Whatever grandfather, George the Something, he did talk to the trees and plants, and he heard him, at times, barking and remonstrating with our little green chums.

Oops! I think I went on a bit.


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 4 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

Thanks for this, TL, old bean. I don't have a problem with Chas. having such friends as Stephen Fry ... he has to have friends.

I must say I wasn't surprised to hear that Di was manipulative. She wasn't well educated but she had a natural flair for playing the media which should tell you something ... and of course she looked lovely so it's the beauty thing again isn't it? She's pretty ergo she must be inherently good and innocent.

I applauded her touchy-feeliness in the face of the usual Royal frigidity and think that she has had a civilising influence on them. But although I found her tragic death utterly sad and appalling I didn't really feel anything much about her one way or the other. I'm sure I'm in a minority of one here but there ya go ...

See you in the Tower ... we'll get WOL to bring us a cake with a file in it ...


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 4 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

I have an anecdote, told me by a friend, since dead, which turns everything about Diana on its head. It's not long enough for a hub, but it is a truly touching little tale of a really good and caring young woman.

And when it comes to it, Angie, I do suffer from that condition known as "She's physically lovely, so she must be good and pure."

My goodness, I am shallow.

Lettice has just commented about that. She looked me in the eye and said, "You may be shallow, but your shallowness is only skin deep."

My chum, 'steve of ian fame', maintains that I am so shallow, that of I turn sideways, I completely disappear.


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 4 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

Aw ... I simply do not believe you are shallow ... you are a honey.

Lettice is a cow ... we both know that. I really must dish the dirt about her and what happened in Cornwall that time. So little time, so much gossip.

Couldn't possible comment on steve of ian ... but one wonders.

x


Kathleen Cochran profile image

Kathleen Cochran 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Someone who writes about British history and gardening - how has it taken me so long to find you! I'll be reading more!


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 4 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

Hi Kathleen ... thank you for finding me ... I hope my work doesn't disappoint.

Thanks for popping by to comment.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 4 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

Kathleen Cochran, you have struck gold.

I can assure you that Angie will never disappoint you. She writes with passion, knowledge and soul.


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 4 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

Aw ... wingman! As usual you are being kind ...

From my soul to yours ... x


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

Oh, the drama Rosamund endured. This stuff is so much better than modern soap operas. I love the detail and open questions that you provide. Women throughout history have never had it easy. Voted up and interesting.


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 3 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

Thanks FlourishAnyway, I agree with you wholeheartedly … they lived in hard times for women and had to be beautiful and/or devious to survive. And of course you had to die before you lost your looks … bleak!


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 3 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

Just read this again. I am still/so impressed by it. My goodness, you can write well woman.

You're going to love this little Malapropism that just entered my head as I was looking at the pictures.

I was thinking how mu ch I liked "Postprandial" art.

Could I have meant Pre-Raphaelite, by any chance?


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 3 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

Well, I suppose you could have enjoyed the art after lunch … but my guess is that being a desperate romantic like myself you meant pre-Raphaelite.

Thanks for pitching up here and telling me I can write … your good opinion means a lot to me, wingman. x


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 3 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

I hope the latest novel is going well.

Put me down for a copy, yeah?

I've been told I am not allowed to buy any more of those book things, but I have been given permission to buy one on Kindle.

Mwah!


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 3 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ... Author

Thanks - just don’t hold your breath. I take 1 step forward and 83 back.

:) X


Geoffrey dalton 2 years ago

An English scholar spent seven years researching the story of Rosamond and Henry and has written a book based on extensive research and informed conjecture. He suggests that they had a long relationship from about 1143 until 1174 when she became ill dying in Godstow Priory in 1176. He had a most impressive tomb erected for her there. Only after he had died did Hugh of Lincoln declare her to be a harlot and have her tomb destroyed. He would never have had the nerve to suggest this whilst Henry was alive. If you want the full story read the book " the tigress and the rose" by Cameron Low. It is a veritable Historical Agatha Chrisie!!!


Anne Harrison profile image

Anne Harrison 17 months ago from Australia

An interesting hub - I knew very little of Rosamond. thank you for sharing, and for the detail and research you have obviously put into your hub. I look forward to reading more of them.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 16 months ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

Anne, I am glad that you have enjoyed reading this Hub and that you have been impressed by the research and love of the subject that Angie has put into it. I agree with you wholeheartedly, and strongly recommend that you look into Angie's other hubs. They are well worth the visit.

I have enjoyed reading her works, and as a result, was fortunate enough to know the woman herself, albeit only online and through e-mails et cetera.

Unfortunately, this very talented lady died at her home in Cornwall in October of 2014, and so her stream of really excellent Hubs and other writings, including a really good novel, have petered out.

She is much missed.

Best wishes,

Ian


Anne Harrison profile image

Anne Harrison 16 months ago from Australia

Hi Ian,

I am so sorry to hear of Angie's death last year, my thoughts to you all,

Anne


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 16 months ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

Thank you.

A great loss, but at least, her wit and intelligence are still there; in her Hubs, her novel and other writings.

Ian

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