Strange Ants - Zombie, Dracula, Herders and Farmers

A zombie ant holds on to a leaf vein even when it's dead. The fungus that turned this ant into a zombie is growing from the ant's head.
A zombie ant holds on to a leaf vein even when it's dead. The fungus that turned this ant into a zombie is growing from the ant's head. | Source

Ants are impressive insects that have intricate colonies. Some have developed very interesting lifestyles. In tropical rainforests, carpenter ants are invaded by a fungus that enters their brain. The fungus controls the behaviour of the ants, turning them into zombies. The queen of another type of ant feeds on the blood of her larvae, reminding scientists of the Dracula legend.

Ants may also be farmers. Some species herd caterpillars. They “milk” their charges by stimulating them to release a sweet secretion. Other ant species take care of aphid colonies, stimulating the aphids to release honeydew for food. Leafcutter ants bite pieces off leaves and take them to underground nests. Here the leaves serve as food for a fungal colony, which the ants harvest and eat.

A Texas leafcutter ant at work
A Texas leafcutter ant at work | Source

The Ant Colony

Ants live on all continents except Antarctica. The greatest variety of ants is found in tropical regions. All known species live in colonies in a home known as a nest. An ant nest is often a complex underground construction with many tunnels and chambers. There may be a raised anthill above the nest, which also has tunnels.

Ant colonies contain a queen who lays eggs, males to fertilize the queen and non-breeding females known as workers. The workers collect food, maintain and protect the nest, rear the young and take care of the queen. The males have one job – to fertilize the queen – and don’t live for very long.

Some ants form supercolonies. When ants from different nests meet, they are normally aggressive towards each other. Scientists have noticed that in a few ant species, ants from different nests are not only unaggressive when they meet but actually cooperate with each other as though they belong to the same colony. These collections of ants are sometimes huge and have been dubbed "supercolonies". Evidence suggests that the ants in a supercolony are closely related genetically.

A Fungus That Creates Ant Zombies

Zombie Ants

The creation of a zombie ant begins when spores of a fungus named Ophiocordyceps unilateralis enter certain species of tropical carpenter ants. The spores geminate inside the ants, producing the thread-like mycelium which makes up the body of the fungus. The mycelium spreads through the body of an infected ant, eventually reaching the brain and releasing chemicals which affect the ant's behaviour.

Infected ants leave their nest in the trees and fall to the forest floor. The temperature and humidity in this area are ideal for fungal survival and reproduction. Under the influence of the fungus, the ant moves to the underside of a leaf which is about ten inches above the ground. The ant then bites down hard on a leaf vein, attaching itself to the underside of the leaf.

The ant eventually dies but maintains its grip on the leaf. The fungal mycelium produces a reproductive structure that sprouts from the ant's head and releases spores from a spore case. The spores then infect more carpenter ants. Researchers have found that many fungus-controlled ants attach themselves to leaves at the same time, forming an ant graveyard.

Carpenter ants carrying a dead bee
Carpenter ants carrying a dead bee | Source

Zombie ants are carpenter ants whose behaviour has been affected by a fungus. Carpenter ants belong to the genus Camponotus. They build their nests in the wood of trees or buildings, but they don't eat wood. They feed mainly on dead insects and honeydew.

Zombie Ants in North America

New fungi that can produce zombie ants have recently been discovered. These discoveries should enable scientists to learn more about the intriguing relationship between the two organisms.

One species of zombie fungus was found in the United States in 2014. The fungus has been studied by scientists at Pennsylvania State University. They've discovered that it releases a complex mixture of behaviour-altering chemicals when it enters an ant belonging to its host species. When the fungus infects an ant of a different species, however, it doesn't release the chemicals and doesn't alter the ant's behaviour, even though it may kill the the insect.

Somehow the zombie fungus "knows" when it's inside an ant that it can control. As David Hughes, an assistant professor of entomology at Penn State says, "the one without the brain controls the one with the brain".

The scientific name of the North American zombie fungus hasn't been finalized. It's believed to be a type of Ophiocordyceps unilateralis. This species appears to be a complex of similar but not identical insects rather than a species in the usual sense.

A dracula ant, or Adetomyrma venatrix
A dracula ant, or Adetomyrma venatrix | Source

Dracula Ants

Dracula ants are classified in the genus Adetomyrma and are found in Madagascar. They are believed to be related to the first ants, which evolved from wasps. Their name was derived from their feeding method, which resembles that of Count Dracula, the vampire in Bram Stoker's famous novel.

Dracula ants live underground. The worker ants are blind. Both the queen and the workers bite holes in the ant larvae and then feed on their blood. Although this process sounds dramatic, the wounds and blood loss don't kill the larvae. Researchers refer to this feeding method as "non-destructive cannibalism". An ant’s blood is technically known as hemolymph and is colorless.

The feeding behaviour of Dracula ants may have been the precursor to the trophallaxis seen in some other ants. In trophallaxis, food or fluid is passed from one member of a community to another by mouth-to-mouth feeding or anus-to-mouth feeding.

The caterpillars of Lycaenid butterflies often have a relationship with ants. This is a Large Blue butterfly, or Maculinea arion
The caterpillars of Lycaenid butterflies often have a relationship with ants. This is a Large Blue butterfly, or Maculinea arion | Source

Ants That Herd and Milk Caterpillars

The caterpillars of many butterflies in the Lycaenid family have a special relationship with ants. Lycaenid butterflies are sometimes known as blues, coppers or hairstreaks. The relationship between the caterpillars and ants takes several forms, but it’s often beneficial for each insect. The ants crawl over the caterpillars and trigger them to release a sugary solution by touching glands on the caterpillars’ bodies with their antennae. The ants then drink the solution. The ants are often said to be “milking” the caterpillars.

Some species of ants build shelters for their caterpillars. At night the ants protect the caterpillars in the shelters. At the start of the day the ants herd the caterpillars up a tree so that the caterpillars can feed on leaves. The ants guard their herd during the day.

Ants and aphids on a foxglove
Ants and aphids on a foxglove | Source

Ants That Farm Aphids

Aphids are small insects found around the world. They are most common in temperate areas, where they are major plant pests. Aphids have a wide range of colours. They may be colourless, pink, red, yellow, green, brown or black. The green forms are sometimes known as greenflies.

Aphids have mouth parts than pierce plant veins and suck up the sugary sap that is being transported in the phloem vessels of the veins. Once they have digested the sap, the aphids release a sweet liquid called honeydew from the ends of their abdomens. Some ant species drink this liquid.

An ant colony "farms" its aphids, carrying them around to new plants when necessary. The ants stimulate the aphids to release a drop of honeydew by tapping or stroking them with either an antenna or a foreleg. They also protect their herd from potential predators. Some ant species collect the eggs produced by the aphids and store them in their nest over winter. They take the eggs back to the plant leaves in the spring.

The relationship between ants and aphids that produce honeydew is an example of mutualism. In mutualism, both animals benefit from their association. In this case, the ants receive a regular source of honeydew and the aphids receive protection from predators.

Ant Farmers

Leafcutter Ants and Fungus Farms

Leafcutter ants are found in the tropics and in the southern United States. They cut pieces from leaves or petals with their sharp jaws and then carry the plant pieces to their nest. Leafcutter ants are sometimes known as “parasol” ants, since they travel holding their leaf or petal pieces above their heads. They may travel as far as two hundred and fifty metres to collect plant material for their nest. The ants find their way home by following a trail of chemical pheromones which they deposited as they travelled away from the nest.

The leafcutter ant colony contains several types of ants of different sizes, each with specialized functions. The largest ant is the queen. Next in size are the soldiers, who protect the nest. Smaller worker ants collect the plant pieces. In the nest, the leaf carriers pass the leaves to even smaller ants, who chew the leaves and turn it into a mulch. The mulch supports the growth of a specific type of fungus, which the ants – especially the larvae – eat. The smallest ants of all, called minima ants, take care of the fungal garden.

The ants tend their fungus crop carefully, removing debris and even destroying invading fungi of a different kind. Bacteria live on the surface of the ants. These bacteria produce antibiotics, which rub off the ants’ bodies and on to the fungus crop, killing the invading fungi.

Leafcutter Ants at Work

Fascinating Ants

About 10,000 species of ants have been identified, but scientists think that around twice as many species actually exist. According to the AntWeb website run by the California Academy of Sciences, more than one thousand trillion individual ants are thought to exist on Earth.

It's true that some ants can be annoying and that some are harmful for plants, other animals or humans. I think that ants are interesting insects, though. Who knows what strange ant behaviors are still waiting to be discovered!

© 2011 Linda Crampton

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Comments 26 comments

IsadoraPandora profile image

IsadoraPandora 5 years ago from Florida, PCB

Love this Hub! Ants are such awesome creatures.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you, IsadoraPandora. I think that ants are fascinating creatures too!


A.A. Zavala profile image

A.A. Zavala 5 years ago from Texas

Love the research! Ants are completely fascinating to me, their organzied behavior amazes me. Completely efficient.


thougtforce profile image

thougtforce 5 years ago from Sweden

A very intresting article, I am amazed over the ants structured societies. The zombie ants and the dracula ants are new to me, how fascinating! Thanks for this well written article filled with great information. Tina


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida

Now this is really antsy research and fascinatng to read. Thank you. I'll have to learn more about the zombie ants - I think I know some.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, A.A. Zavala. Yes, researching ant behavior is very interesting! Thanks for your comment.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the visit and comment, Tina. I am interested in all ants, but I find dracula ants and zombie ants especially interesting.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, drbj. Thanks for the visit. I'm hoping that scientists will soon discover more details about how the fungus controls the zombie ant's behavior - it certainly is a fascinating topic!


b. Malin profile image

b. Malin 5 years ago

Alicia, as usual a Wonderful Hub. You can see the research and time that you took to cover the topic of Ants as only you can! Thanks for sharing.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you for such a kind comment, b. Malin!! I appreciate it very much.


Mrs. Menagerie profile image

Mrs. Menagerie 5 years ago from The Zoo

This is fascinating! I find bugs in general to be so interesting.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Mrs. Menagerie. Thank you for your comment. I agree with you - I think all animals are interesting!


epigramman profile image

epigramman 5 years ago

.....incredible world class research here and such a fascinating (and perhaps a little known) hub subject - and one which should be installed into every virtual classroom in the cyber universe .....


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you so much for the visit and your wonderful comment, epigramman!! I enjoy studying ants, especially the stranger species.


prasetio30 profile image

prasetio30 5 years ago from malang-indonesia

Nice information. I had never knew about this before. These animals so scary. Thanks for writing this and share with us. I love all videos above. Rated up!

Prasetio


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Prasetio. Thank you very much for the visit and the rating!


OBAT ALAMI PAPUA 5 years ago

ant plants Myrmecodia pendans of Wamena in Papua Indonesia


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the information about ant plants, OBAT ALAMI PAPUA.


MarkMAllen15 profile image

MarkMAllen15 5 years ago

I never heard about Dracula ants and zombies before. Unique and interesting hub, AliciaC.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks, MarkMAllen15. It's nice to meet you!


fooo 4 years ago

ants=ausome


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

I agree, fooo - ants are awesome! Thanks for the comment.


6th grade science student 4 years ago

OMG Thank you so much!!!!!!!!!!!!! I had to do an Endangered animal project for science(Hence the name) Then I came to this link and I saw the wonderful Dracula Ant! Thanks to you guys I got an A+ on my project.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

I'm glad that your ant project was so successful, 6th grade science student! Thanks for the comment.


Vlad Real History profile image

Vlad Real History 2 years ago from Bucharest, Romania

It is interesting to find that there are ants named Dracula. :)) Maybe Prince Vlad would not have been proud of this...but this is the science.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks for the visit and the interesting comment, Vlad Real History!

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