Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

In ancient city of Ephesus, the goddess Artemis (Diana) was the goddess of fertility.  Thus, its image has many breasts as interpreted in archaeology.  The site and the few remaining ruins of the temple can now be seen in south of Izmir, Turkey.  The location of the ruins of Temple of Artemis is now a swamp.

The temple of Artemis has many columns and they are fully made with marble, except for the wooden tile roof.  It also housed many works of art made by famous ancient sculptors.  Many fragments of the sculptures displayed in this temple were recovered and rebuilt and can now be seen in “Ephesus Room” in the British Museum.

The Temple of Artemis was built and rebuilt about three times in its history, until it was finally closed down and abandoned due to the rise of Christianity.  First, it was built by an architect from Cretes; Chersiphron and his son, Metagenes.  When it was finished, this temple attracted many worshippers from far off lands during that time.  On the same night that Alexander the Great was born, Herostratus burned down the temple.  Herostratus was determined to become famous at any cost.  Surely, burning down one of the most precious temples of the time will make him well known all over the world.  Herostratus was then put to death through torture by The Ephesians for committing the crime.  Many years later, Alexander the Great offered to rebuild this temple but the Ephesians refused.  It was later rebuilt after his death.  After the second reconstruction, the Goths set this temple on fire together with many other cities they come across.  For the third time, the Ephesians rebuilt this temple.  Years after its reconstruction though, many Ephesians had converted to Christianity, and therefore was closed down along with other temples in Ephesus.   It was later destroyed by a mob and some of its stones were used in construction of other buildings.

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Stamp with image of Temple of Artemis at EphesusAn artist's illustrationStatue of goddess Artemis for whom the temple was built forTemple of Artemis as can be seen today, in ruinsTemple of Artemis as can be seen today, in ruins
Stamp with image of Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
Stamp with image of Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
An artist's illustration
An artist's illustration
Statue of goddess Artemis for whom the temple was built for
Statue of goddess Artemis for whom the temple was built for
Temple of Artemis as can be seen today, in ruins
Temple of Artemis as can be seen today, in ruins
Temple of Artemis as can be seen today, in ruins
Temple of Artemis as can be seen today, in ruins

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Comments 12 comments

quicksand profile image

quicksand 7 years ago

Throughout history the destruction of evidence of various forms of lifestyles and recorded knowledge has been very common. How pitiful indeed. We would otherwise have accurate records of many great events.


BeatsMe profile image

BeatsMe 7 years ago Author

Hi Quicksand, I agree with you on that. I think that ancient historians have recorded history well enough. Unfortunately, time and calamities have destroyed records that were otherwise kept for future reference.


cgull8m profile image

cgull8m 7 years ago from North Carolina

Great Hub and pictures. I am always amazed at Greek architecture and their works. I agree with you guys about lot of history getting lost. But with Google we can be able to save these works forever at least in the form of records and files.


BeatsMe profile image

BeatsMe 7 years ago Author

Thanks Cgull. :) I sure hope it will. I'm just a little worried that nothing is going to last forever, like most people are saying. :D


daytripeer 6 years ago

Your hubs always cause me to use my imagination. You do things for the reader other than just giving out great information. I thank you for this.


BeatsMe profile image

BeatsMe 6 years ago Author

Thanks you, Daytripeer. :)


bob 6 years ago

coooooooool


BeatsMe profile image

BeatsMe 6 years ago Author

Thanks, Bob.


XxJamieLynn143xX 6 years ago

lmaooo the pictures :)) ehh so so information though. could have been better


BeatsMe profile image

BeatsMe 6 years ago Author

Thanks for dropping by, JamieLynn.


katyzzz profile image

katyzzz 6 years ago from Sydney, Australia

very interesting, beats me, history always beats me.


BeatsMe profile image

BeatsMe 6 years ago Author

Thanks, Katyzzz. :)

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