The Bunya Pine - A Strange and Useful Plant

An especially large example of a bunya pine cone - huge and very heavy!
An especially large example of a bunya pine cone - huge and very heavy! | Source

What is a Bunya Pine?

The bunya pine, or Araucaria bidwillii, is famous for its huge cones and its delicious seeds. It's a relative of the monkey puzzle tree or Chilean pine. Like its relative, the bunya pine is an evergreen conifer and has an unusual branching pattern, strange leaves and edible seeds inside a large cone. Even the smaller cones of a bunya pine are the size of a bowling ball. Some can be as large as a person's head, or even bigger. It's dangerous to be under a bunya pine when it's dropping its cones!

The bunya pine is native to Queensland in northeastern Australia and belongs to the family Araucariaceae. The family was widespread in the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. Its members existed in both the northern and southern hemisphere and coexisted with dinosaurs. Today the family is restricted to the southern hemisphere, except for cultivated specimens, but its members still have unique features that are sometimes described as "reptilian".

The bunya pine grows slowly and lives for a long time - perhaps for five hundred years or more. There is a lot that is still unknown about the plant, however. The tree grows in the wild and is also used as an ornamental plant.

A bunya pine tree
A bunya pine tree | Source

The Unusual Trunk and Branches of a Bunya Pine Tree

Trunk

A bunya pine tree may reach a height of 45 meters (almost 148 feet) and a diameter of 1.5 meters. (a little over 4 feet). The thick and sturdy trunk is very straight and has a horizontally furrowed bark. It's often said to resemble the leg of an elephant or a dinosaur in appearance.

Branches

The branches of the bunya pine are arranged around the trunk in whorls. The immature tree is shaped like a pyramid. As the tree matures, it loses some of its lower branches and develops a dome-shaped crown at the upper part of the trunk.

After the lower branches drop, shorter whorls of branches often develop from dormant buds below the domed crown. This sometimes gives the tree a two-tiered appearance.

The branches of a bunya pine have a strange appearance. They are bare except for a dense tuft of small branches at their tips, which bear spiky leaves.

Leaves of an Araucaria (possibly Araucaria angustifolia) showing their prickly points and their  overlapping form; the leaves are sometimes likened to a reptile's scales
Leaves of an Araucaria (possibly Araucaria angustifolia) showing their prickly points and their overlapping form; the leaves are sometimes likened to a reptile's scales | Source

The Leaves of a Bunya Pine

Like the trunk and branches, the leaves of the bunya pine are unusual. The tree's leaves are arranged in multiple rows that overlap and completely surround a branch. The leaves are stiff and pointed. The prickly points can be very painful when they jab into the skin. On younger branches the leaves are arranged in two rows instead of multiple rows.

The leaves of a bunya pine resemble those of a monkey puzzle tree but aren't identical. The leaves of the monkey puzzle tree are roughly triangular in shape with a pointed tip and a wide base. Those of the bunya pine have a pointed tip and a tapered base. The monkey puzzle tree is also an unusual plant and belongs to the same family as the bunya pine.

Based on its name, we might assume that the bunya pine is a type of pine tree. This isn't the case, however. Both the bunya pine and the monkey puzzle tree belong to the family Araucariaceae. Pine trees belong to the family Pinaceae. Both families belong to the order Pinales, so they are distant relatives.

Bunya pine cone
Bunya pine cone | Source

Bunya Pine Cones

The bunya pine produces a high quality wood. This wood is useful for making furniture and for constructing musical instruments such as acoustic guitars. For many people, though, the value of the bunya pine depends on its cones and seeds.

A tree bearing mature female cones is potentially very dangerous. The cones weigh ten to fifteen pounds, or sometimes even more. They are often said to resemble dark green pineapples. Bunya pine cones are generally larger and heavier than pineapples, however, and they have the added danger of falling to the ground from a height.

Unlike the female cones, the male cones (which produce the pollen grains) are long and slender. They have a much smaller mass than the female cones.

Some public gardens that contain bunya pines barricade the area around the trees when the female cones are dropping, since a blow from a cone could be deadly for visitors.

Bunya pine nuts
Bunya pine nuts | Source

The Nuts and Seeds of a Bunya Pine Cone

The cone of a bunya pine contains fifty to a hundred and fifty "nuts", although these don't have the same structure as the nuts of a flowering plant. Each nut is enclosed by a thin covering of tissue, or husk, which can be easily removed. Once this is done, the seed coat or shell of the nut must be opened with a nutcracker or hammer to reveal the large and very tasty seed inside.

I've never tasted a bunya pine seed, but it reportedly has a delicious, nutty flavour. The seeds can be eaten raw but are often boiled - sometimes in brine - or roasted. They are also steamed, fried and baked. The roasted seeds taste like chestnuts. The seeds are high in carbohydrates and low in fat.

A tree doesn't produce seeds until it's fourteen to twenty years old. Bunya pine seeds generally take a long time to produce a shoot. The shoot may not appear until several months to well over a year after a seed is planted.

Collecting and Extracting Bunya Pine Seeds

Bunya Pine Nuts - Bushfood or Bush Tucker

Bunya pine nuts are a wonderful food resource which often goes unused. However, a growing number of people are becoming interested in the nuts as bushfood, which is also known as bush tucker. Bushfood was originally collected or hunted in the wild by the indigenous people of Australia. Collecting bushfood is a similar idea to the process of foraging in the wild areas of North America.

When nuts are available, they're sold at roadside stands in some parts of Australia. Bunya pine nuts (or more accurately the seed inside the nuts) can either be eaten whole or ground to make a flour or paste. The flour is used to make pancakes, breads, cakes and other baked products.

Roasting and Shelling Bunya Nuts Outdoors

Bunya Pine Nuts and the Indigenous People of Australia

The aboriginal people of Australia once considered bunya pines to be sacred plants. The trees were so important to their culture that cutting one down was illegal according to their laws.

Every three years, when the yield of nuts peaked, huge numbers of indigenous people would gather to celebrate the harvest and feast on the nuts. They cooked the nuts or stored them underground to improve their flavour.

The gathering was also used for socialization between different groups and for important events, such as trading and the arrangement of marriages. Tribal differences were temporarily set aside during the celebration.

In recent years, an annual festival known as Bunya Dreaming has been held in Australia. The festival is a celebration of all things bunya and is held in memory of older festivals. Many different foods made from bunya nuts are on display. There are also bunya art displays, cone gathering, husking and weight-guessing competitions and music and story telling performances. The Bunya Dreaming festival has great importance to the indigenous people of Australia.

A Tribute to the Bunya Pine, or Bunya Bunya

Bunya Pines as Ornamental Plants

The bunya pine is an interesting and fun tree to grow as an ornamental plant and as a source of food. Since the tree grows slowly, it's sometimes used as an indoor plant. The tree eventually needs to be planted outdoors, however.

Since germination can take so long, some people prefer to buy a bunya pine as a seedling rather than as a seed. There is a special joy in seeing a seed germinate, but this joy may be postponed for a long time when someone plants a bunya pine seed.

The bunya pine prefers full sun but tolerates some cold. It needs to be watered regularly, but the soil in which it's growing must be well drained. The location for a bunya pine needs to be considered very carefully, since it will grow very tall and could eventually produce heavy and potentially dangerous cones. The cones fall in July in the northern hemisphere and in January in the southern hemisphere. The area around a tree needs to be protected so that the cones don't damage property or injure people as they drop. Still, even though precautions are necessary, growing and observing the unusual bunya pine are enjoyable activities.

The Bunya Pine - A Tree Profile for Gardeners

© 2014 Linda Crampton

More by this Author


Comments 96 comments

RachaelOhalloran profile image

RachaelOhalloran 2 years ago from United States

This is an interesting look at a tree I've never heard of before. I like how you pick topics to educate the reader with interesting videos to further illustrate. Voted up, useful and interesting.

PS We need an educational button lol


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much, Rachel. I appreciate your votes and your comment, especially so soon after I published the hub!


billybuc profile image

billybuc 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

My goodness! I'd hate to get hit in the head by one of those if it fell out of the tree. Sheez. I'm quite happy with our small pine cones. :) Interesting as always my friend.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

I agree - the thought of being hit by a falling cone is frightening! Thanks so much for the comment, Bill. I appreciate it.


Venkatachari M profile image

Venkatachari M 2 years ago from Hyderabad, India

It's a wonderful awesome hub. The Bunya Pine, mostly unknown to most of us. Now, I have a clear cut idea of it. So interesting and amazing tree with nutritional seeds. Thanks for sharing.

Voted up and awesome.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for such a kind comment and for the votes, Venkatachari M!


DDE profile image

DDE 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

I like all the beautiful photos and the nuts are quite big. As usual you are the best in writing on so many different topics. Informative and so helpful in many ways. Voted up!


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

Wonderful hub Alicia. You made HOTD with the Monkey Puzzle Tree so should do the same with this. I remember you saying you were in the process of writing about the Bunya Pine. We live only about an hour from the Bunya Mountains where there are more Bunya Pines than anywhere else in Australia. They are going to have a market there every month so we will be checking that out. We already have a bucket full of nuts that we got from pulling a cone apart. Still have to cook them yet. Anyway, well done. Voted up.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you, DDE. I appreciate your comment and the vote!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks so much for the great comment, Jodah! How wonderful to live so near to the Bunya Mountains. The market sounds interesting. So does the thought of getting a bucket full of nuts from a cone!


Buildreps profile image

Buildreps 2 years ago from Europe

Very interesting article, I've never heard of the Bunya Pine tree. And what an amazing seeds! This must be dangerous indeed when they start to fall.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Buildreps. Yes, the cones and seeds are amazing. I certainly wouldn't want to be near a tree when the cones are falling! Thank you for the comment.


sallybea profile image

sallybea 2 years ago from Norfolk

AliciaC

Another fascinating hub about another rather special tree. I saw one of these in the Royal Botanical gardens in Tasmania. Thanks you for sharing.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you for the comment and for sharing the information, Sally!


bdegiulio profile image

bdegiulio 2 years ago from Massachusetts

Hi Linda. Oh my, that's one big cone, would hate to get hit by one of them. I've never heard of the Bunya Pine, very interesting. Thank you for the education, again. Have agreat week.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 2 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

I really enjoyed this Hub. I come from the Pine Tree State of Maine (New England, USA) and thanks to Chinese wooden shipping containers, some of the Maine pines are being ravaged by Chinese bark beetles. Maybe they need to start planting these. Too cold? Easy harvesting, if you live nearby you can just listen for the thud, and feel the floor tremble! lol


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Bill. Thanks for the visit. Bunya pine cones certainly are big! I hope you have a great week, too.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

I'm sorry to hear about the damage to the Maine pines, Perspycacious. Harvesting bunya pine nuts would certainly be easy and fun, as long as the tree was growing far enough away from homes, cars and paths! There are a few bunya pines growing on private property near my home in coastal British Columbia, but we don't get very cold winters. I don't know how the trees would do in Maine!


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

What an unusual, well researched hub, supplemented with so many great resources. Voted way up, sharing and pinning!


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Fascinating tree that I have once again never heard of before, but I can always count on you to educate us. I would love to see one in person, but would not that cone to drop on me! Wow, I am amazed at how huge it is. That is interesting that the seeds are edible.

Great presentation and insight you have here as always. This should be another HOTD!

Voted up ++++ tweeting, pinning, G+ and sharing

Blessings always


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you so much for the lovely comment, Flourish. I appreciate the vote, the share and the pin, too!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Faith. Thank you once again for the kind comment, the vote and all the shares! I appreciate your support very much. Blessings to you, Faith.


breakfastpop profile image

breakfastpop 2 years ago

Once again you taught me something new. I appreciate your work and thanks. Voted up and interesting!


handymanbill profile image

handymanbill 2 years ago from western pennsylvania

Hard hat area. That is an interesting tree. Interesting Hub


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the comment and the vote, breakfastpop!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, handymanbill. Yes, hard hats would definitely be useful around a bunya pine when the cones are falling! Thanks for the comment.


annart profile image

annart 2 years ago from SW England

Lovely tree and the cones are amazing! Will make sure I never stand underneath one of those! You've given us lots of info on the tree and its varied uses. Really interesting, thanks.

Ann


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Ann. Thank you for the visit and the comment. It's a good plan to avoid standing under a bunya pine, at least at certain times in the year!


CMHypno profile image

CMHypno 2 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

Another fascinating hub Alicia and what a beautiful tree. But definitely one to avoid standing underneath when its dropping its cones.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the comment, Cynthia. It is a beautiful tree, even though it can be dangerous at times!


carrie Lee Night profile image

carrie Lee Night 2 years ago from Northeast United States

Looks like a dinosaur laid a troll egg ! :). Looks very interesting and unique. Thank you for sharing something new and bless it for being something to eat if need be.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

I love your description of a bunya pine cone, carrie Lee Night! It is great that the cone can produce so many edible nuts. The tree can be a great source of food. Thanks for the visit.


Cyndi10 profile image

Cyndi10 2 years ago from Georgia

Hi AliciaC, What an interesting tree! How neat that it was so important to the aborigines they would put aside tribal differences to celebrate the harvest. I imagine you have to really scramble around to gather the cones at harvest time, given the unpredictability of falling cones.

Thanks for sharing. Voted up and sharing.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the comment, the vote and the share, Cyndi10. The history of the bunya pine and its meaning to aboriginal people is very interesting. It has been and is a very special tree!


caseymel profile image

caseymel 2 years ago from Indiana

Wow! That is a huge pine cone!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

It certainly is! Thanks for the visit, caseymel.


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 2 years ago

I have not seen cones that big ever! I thought the coconuts here were dangerous! Well, you have written another wonderful and interesting article. THank you for the education.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Dianna. Thank you very much for the visit and the lovely comment!


shara63 profile image

shara63 2 years ago from Delhi

That's really wonderful ...i've never seen or heard of this strange Bunya pine that bears so huge cones...it's interesting and informative hub...Thankyou!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you, shara63! I appreciate your visit.


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 2 years ago from West Virginia

I have never heard of this tree before. Thanks for the interesting information.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the visit and the comment, Lady Guinevere.


Mel Carriere profile image

Mel Carriere 2 years ago from San Diego California

Another outstanding natural history lesson. I wouldn't want to take a nap underneath one of these because I might not wake up. Great hub!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks so much for the kind comment, Mel. I wouldn't want to fall asleep under a bunya pine either!


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

Once again a great read about something I had never heard of before, that is one huge pine cone! fascinating facts and I learned something new! nell


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the visit and the comment, Nell! Yes, the cones can sometimes be amazingly big. They're very impressive.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

I have seen the monkey puzzle tree in my travels but not this tree...at least to my knowledge. Those pine cones are amazing! Thanks for this most interesting post. Pinning to my trees board.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the comment and the pin, Peggy. I appreciate your visit.


mySuccess8 profile image

mySuccess8 2 years ago

There is wealth of information about this plant which I learn from this Hub. Very clearly explained, and congrats on HotD!


BillyZhang profile image

BillyZhang 2 years ago from Sydney, Australia

Interesting read and cool facts. I learnt something new today. Thanks for sharing.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you for the comment and the congratulations, mySuccess8!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the visit and the comment, BillyZhang.


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

I'm back to say Congratulations on HOTD! This was an unusual and interesting hub and very deserving.


heidithorne profile image

heidithorne 2 years ago from Chicago Area

Congrats on Hub of the Day! Well deserved for this beautiful and interesting hub!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the second visit and the congratulations, Flourish!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you so much, Heidi. I appreciate your comment and the congratulations.


CatherineGiordano profile image

CatherineGiordano 2 years ago from Orlando Florida

A well deserved hub of the day. Beautiful pictures, loads of information, great graphic design, an interesting and unusual topic. I rated interesting and useful and awesome.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for such a lovely comment, CatherineGiordano! I appreciate your votes as well.


billybuc profile image

billybuc 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

Congratulations on the HOTD. Very good article!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much, Bill!


MarleneB profile image

MarleneB 2 years ago from Northern California, USA

This is a fascinating article. I learned a lot about the Bunya Pine tree and now I kind of want to grow one for myself, but the fact that they drop such heavy cones and someone could get hurt scares me from trying. Anyway, I really enjoyed reading. Congratulations on receiving the Hub of the Day award.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks so much for the comment and the congratulations, Marlene. I appreciate your visit.


bobtyndall 2 years ago

Those would make great Christmas tree decorations. Paint them up red, green or white. All kinds of possibilities.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks for the visit and for sharing the great idea, bobtyndall!


dragonflycolor 2 years ago

Very interesting. I did not know such a plant existed!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you for commenting, dragonflycolor. The bunya pine is certainly unusual!


SAQIB6608 profile image

SAQIB6608 2 years ago from HYDERABAD PAKISTAN

Excellent Article. I just continuously read it. Well Organised.


Thelma Alberts profile image

Thelma Alberts 2 years ago from Germany

Wow! That´s a huge thing. Congrats on the HOTD award. I have not seen this Bunya pine tree yet. Thanks for sharing this useful information. Happy weekend!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the kind comment, SAQIB6608.


RNMSN profile image

RNMSN 2 years ago from Tucson, Az

what an interesting hub Alicia and way to go on editors choice/hub of the day!!!but ouch...don't let chicken little get near this tree or the warning cry of the sky is falling will never be heard again :)


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you for the comment and the congratulations, Thelma. The cones are definitely huge! I hope you have a good weekend, too.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks for the visit and for the kind and funny comment, RNMSN!


Rhonda Lytle profile image

Rhonda Lytle 2 years ago from Deep in the heart of Dixie

That's by far the largest pine cone I ever saw. I love how you included the information on the indigenous people and how the plant factored so highly in their culture. I found this highly informative, interesting and a beautiful page. Well done!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you for the lovely comment, Rhonda! I appreciate it very much.


WriterJanis profile image

WriterJanis 2 years ago from California

This is the first I've heard of this. What an interesting plant this is. It sure would be practical for cooking.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, WriterJanis. Yes, the bunya pine is an interesting plant that can provide a lot of food. Thanks for commenting.


poetryman6969 profile image

poetryman6969 2 years ago

If you could just get your enemies to walk under the tree when the pine cones fall you could take them out!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

This wouldn't be very nice, but it might work! Thanks for the visit, poetryman6969.


thoughtfulgirl2 profile image

thoughtfulgirl2 2 years ago from East Coast

I had heard of this tree before, but this hub brought it all together. A very interesting and informative hub


ladyguitarpicker profile image

ladyguitarpicker 2 years ago from 3460NW 50 St Bell, Fl32619

Alicia I never heard of this tree, but found this information very interesting and I like to learn something new. I enjoyed my visit. Thanks Stella


Heidi Vincent profile image

Heidi Vincent 2 years ago from GRENADA

I LOVE your introduction photo! This is a very interesting plant. I am truly amazed at how big the cone is and how long it lives. Thanks for sharing! Congratulations on wining Hub of the Day, too!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much, thoughtfulgirl2.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you, Stella. I appreciate your comment.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the comment and the congratulations, Heidi! I agree - the bunya pine is a very interesting plant.


stuff4kids profile image

stuff4kids 2 years ago

Awesome hub! An extraordinary tree, indeed. I was especially interested in the aboriginal regard for the Bunya and the fact that it isn't a pine, despite the name. I think that applies to Koala bears, too, doesn't it - that they're not actually bears?

Voted up - and congrats on HoTD! :)


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the comment, the vote and the congratulations, stuff4kids! Yes, the koala bear isn't really a bear. Common names for plants and animals can be very confusing!


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

Such a beautiful and unusual tree. I certainly have never seen cones that large or as weighty. Those seeds are nothing to sneeze at either. Nice work, Alicia. I always look forward to your unusual, educational material.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the comment, Deb. Yes, both the cones and the seeds of the bunya pine are impressive! It's an interesting tree.


Lady Lorelei profile image

Lady Lorelei 2 years ago from Canada

I have always lived around pine trees but have never heard of this one. That is a pine cone find that would send our Canadian squirrels into heaven lol. What a delightful taste of tree trivia.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

I love the image of a squirrel trying to eat a bunya pine seed! I appreciate your visit and comment, Lady Lorelei.


Nancy Hardin profile image

Nancy Hardin 2 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

Now I want to eat some of the seeds of the Banya tree! I'd also like to grow a tree as an indoor plant and see how it does, before putting it out in our harsh summer heat. I've always loved finding out about unusual things from other countries, and this was a top enjoyment for me.As an ironice footnote, AliciaC, the largest and oldest trees in the world (Sequoia sempervirens) have a tiny little pine cone you could hold in the palm of your hand, close your hand and it would never be seen. Odd things really pique my interest it seems.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Odd things interest me too, Nancy! Thank you very much for such an interesting comment.


VioletteRose profile image

VioletteRose 2 years ago from Chicago

I have never heard of this before, its very interesting. Thank you :)


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you for the visit, VioletteRose. I think that the bunya pine is very interesting, too!


Henk Lottering 5 months ago

Hallo. I'm living in a town called Polokwane in the Limpopo proven ce of South Africa.As toddler our nabour had two of these trees in his yard.They were chopped down to make space for office buildings about 30 years ago.I was excited when about two months ago I

I saw a nother tree in our town.Sad to say this week I found this beautiful tree also being chopped to make space for new development.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 5 months ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

I'm sorry to hear about the destruction of the trees, Henk. I wish humans could find a way to construct buildings without chopping down trees or that they planted new trees once the building is completed. Planting sometimes happens, which is great. The problem is that some trees take many years to grow.

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