The Cumbrian Accent

Welcome - Calpol 25 Here

Hi everyone its Calpol 25 here....

I got the idea about this hub from Daniel Carter yesterday about doing a video hub with my accent for you to see that its a very different sort of English to what many of you will be used to hearing.

My accent is Northern English and is Cumbrian therefore it becomes a very complex accent for you to understand so I have linked this hub to the cumbrian colloquial one so that you can refer to that when you hear me speak.

I hope you enjoy and please let me know if you want a second part :)

All the best.

Calpol 25

Stage One - Eh and Gan

Stage One these are excerpts from the colloquial hub so you can understand how these words are used and their meanings :)

Eh - this is tonal as I have mentioned - This word has many meanings and i say word because it is one of the most common colloquial words used in cumbria, and depeneding on what context you use it can decide how you speak to some one, for example EH is used at the end of nearly every sentence when talking some one - so I will explain this mysterious word to you as it has many meanings - for example - When said aggresively - EH! - means what did you say? When said politely usually in a sentence for example - How you doing eh? - the eh means, is there anything wrong? Some times when people are confused they will use EH!! aggresively not always meaning to be aggressive its just trying to understand what you said? And it is this Eh that a lot of cumbrians use, further south of the country in the other counties people will say Ay? and then when you come to cumbria we Eh?. Becareful when using this word, make sure you dont come across aggresive as it can start a fight with someone, as it is a short way of saying Are you wanting a fight? Its a complex word.

Gan - The word Gan is very commonly used here and replaces the word "going". This word is used quite alot by everyone in cumbria, and is pronounced with a gutteral G and the word an added together to form Gan.

A very common sentence in cumbria is "Where ya gan to?" Meaning where are you going?



Stage Two - Meeting & Greeting

Stage Two - Meeting & Greeting

Its pretty simple just try to remember the three way stage as I explain in the video.

My Goodbye Message

I hope that you have enjoyed listening to me ramble on and that you have found this hub useful. please let meknow if you want to learn more as I will bring a part two out to you :)

All the best Calpol 25 :)

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Comments 43 comments

alian346 profile image

alian346 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland

A novel Hub, Callum.

You know that you don't seem to have a broad Cumberland accent! Unlike my cousins (yes, Mabel's sons!). You are very refined!

Ian.


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

Thank you my mum insisted we had elocution lessons as children as to avoid the broadness of the language but I can still do it now and again :)

Thanks for commenting Ian x


JKenny profile image

JKenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

A very interesting hub, Callum. I work with a guy from Wigan and my Nan is from Hartlepool and I can definitely recognise their accents when you speak. Incidentally, apart from your own, what is your favourite accent? and least favourite? My favourites are Lancashire and Geordie, least favourite is Scouse and Essex.


Lord De Cross profile image

Lord De Cross 4 years ago

Neat LOL! I knew the Normans and the Saxons made this mess. I thought there was a Northumbrian too. And Kentish? I feel soory for thie venerable Joda..I mean Bede..! Nice read!

LORD


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

There is a Northumbrian but its more geordie influenced than cumbrian though it does have a slight scottish twang to it too :)


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

@ JKenny my favourite accents are Scottish and Scouser and Southern Irish my least favourites are Brummy and Northern Irish because I cant understand a word :)


INFJay profile image

INFJay 4 years ago from Santa Rosa, California

I enjoyed listening to your hub and insight to the Cumbrian accent. This is quite helpful for me as I watch a lot of British television, the latest series I just watched is Vera. I needed to use subtitles to make sure I understood everything as there are words used that we don't use in everyday American conversation. Good job!!


Ardie profile image

Ardie 4 years ago from Neverland

OOoh what a fascinating Hub idea! I love accents and I always try to mimic them hahah so a part 2 is in demand!!! That said, you should've heard me and my 6 year old both sitting here trying to copy what you said :) Yes, I have dragged her into my weird accent obsession!


alian346 profile image

alian346 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland

The Aberdeen brogue sounds absolutely lovely but I'm afraid I can't understand a word of it and I'm a Scotsman!

Ian.


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

Thanks INFJay

Thanks Ardie I will bring a part two to you tomorrow as I need to decide now the easy words to mimic for you then we can work up from there. Am so glad you enjoyed would have loved to have heard you and the little one trying to mimic it when we relate to a child here in cumbria we say this Bairden - phonetically pronounced as Bare-den to mean child :)


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

Ian you want to hear west cumbrian thats a language on its own and extremely broad even us here in northern cumbria cannot always understand what they mean :)


JKenny profile image

JKenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

Haha! I know what you mean about brummie, I live just south of Birmingham, and even I struggle to understand what they're saying at times :)


Sally's Trove profile image

Sally's Trove 4 years ago from Southeastern Pennsylvania

I LOVE this Hub! It is so neat to hear the Cumbrian accent and also listen to your detailed explanations that dissect the accent into understandable bits (understandable to an American!). The videos of you speaking are a joy...you are very engaging. I think I'd like to see/hear you do a dialogue with a friend, in the usual way and usual speed that you would speak, and then provide a test at the end for Americans to figure out what you said. LOL Voted up and awesome.


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

Hi Sally

What a fantastic idea, now that could be for part two or three I am thinking about it now :)

Thank you so much for that it has inspired me now lol i will do this then you can see the language in use ;)

Thanks again

Calpol25 x


CASE1WORKER profile image

CASE1WORKER 4 years ago from UNITED KINGDOM

I would imagine that this would cause a stir with those learning the English language for the first time! A great hub


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

Thank you Caseworker - yeah it used to drive my teachers up the wall when we spoke the language but am glad you like x


annart profile image

annart 4 years ago from SW England

I love anything to do with regional accents and dialect words. My grandfather was a Geordie and my grandmother from Durham, so I adore the accents in and around Newcastle - so musical and soft and delightful. My partner is from Birmingham and I'm always teasing him about his accent - not one of my favourites! I'm from near Brighton, Sussex which does have its own accent but not so interesting or distinctive; it does, however, have a few regional words, one of which is 'twitten' - I wonder if anyone out there knows what it means? (Those of you from Sussex who know, please don't give the game away!) Thanks for nudging the brain cells! Voted up and interesting.


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

Your very welcome annart am so glad you liked it, dying to know what Twitten means, although we use it here as a form of complaining about something - The twitten thing was annoying :)


annart profile image

annart 4 years ago from SW England

Clue - think 'snicket'! (Your version is interesting.)


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

I am still stuck :)


annart profile image

annart 4 years ago from SW England

Never mind. I'll be back tomorrow to see if anyone's come up with it - I won't keep you in suspense for too long!


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

Okay annart looking forward to finding out :)


alian346 profile image

alian346 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland

Is it a path? I have visited friends down in Brighton (I'm a Scot) and seem to remember the word.

Ian.


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

Weird one isn't it Ian :)


annart profile image

annart 4 years ago from SW England

You're almost there, Ian, well done! However, it's a particular type of path. I'll give you a little more time......

Ann


alian346 profile image

alian346 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland

A path through a wood?

Ian.


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

A Garden Path?

Calpol25


annart profile image

annart 4 years ago from SW England

No to both! I'm signing out now - will look in tomorrow. See ya!


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

Or is it Twitters evil brother Twitten who has made a pathway to his site and is trying to take over the world using Pinky and the Brain, Dr Evil, Mini Me, and some computer genius called Fred who drinks a lot of Coffee and is a 43yr old virgin who lives in Mini Me's basement?


alian346 profile image

alian346 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland

What, Callum? Methinks you're still being affected by what you described in your latest Hub!

Ann, is it a path between buildings?

Ian.


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

Yeah thats it Ian, I have PMS - Post Morrisons Syndrome what can I say lololololol :)

Callum x


Rosie2010 profile image

Rosie2010 4 years ago from Toronto, Canada

Hiya Calpol25, I love your Cumbrian accent! Now, if only I could understand what you were saying... just kiddin'!!! LOL It's difficult to synchronize the audio and video of a webcam, isn't it? I'm having the same problem. But you did well for your first videos. Congratulations! Cheers!

Have a nice day,

Rosie


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

Thank you Rosie I am sure we will master the audio and sync thingy lol :)

Thank you again it was a first attempt so will definitely try again ;)

Have a great day too ;)

Calpol x


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 4 years ago from Texas

This is a very interesting hub. I would have not thought of doing this, but I don't have an interesting accent at all. Just plain... as Ardie would say!


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

You should do it homestead I love mimicking accents so I would be able to mimic yours :)


Poohgranma profile image

Poohgranma 4 years ago from On the edge

A brilliant idea for a hub! I will now be bored with "just words" and will never again want to write such.

You're voice is as delightful as I'd imagined. I have a Norwegian tie somewhere in my background but I don't know more than that. I so enjoy hearing the different words and uses of words. I'll be following as many of these hubs as you produce!


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

Thanks Poohgranma I will keep producing them till we get to the nitty gritty of the language and you all in America are speaking it lololol!

Thanks for commenting :)


iamaudraleigh 4 years ago

I like your hub. I cannot wait to see part 2!!!


annart profile image

annart 4 years ago from SW England

Yes! Well done, Ian! It's a fairly narrow passage or short cut between buildings, as is the Yorkshire word 'snickett' I believe. You deserve extra hub points for that! Thanks, Callum, for the instigation of this diversion! Best wishes, Ann


calpol25 profile image

calpol25 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (At Home With My Wonderful Partner) Author

Thanks ann I enjoyed the suspense :)


alian346 profile image

alian346 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland

Yay - logic won out!

Thanks, Ann - for the lesson and the fun!

Ian.


annart profile image

annart 4 years ago from SW England

Your welcome, Ian!


Michael 3 years ago

You're very sweet to have posted these lessons. I first looked for Cumbrian because I heard it once and it sounded sort of American. A guy called George Ball who was on HMS Dorsetshire in WWII spoke like an American in interviews. He died last year and I saw he was Cumbrian.

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