The Dissolution of The Hohokam Tribe

Intoduction

Arizona's history is inspired by ancient tribes who used their resources to farm, and make unique crafts. The Hohokam tribe is one of the most talked about tribes that were able to make a living in the desert.

It remains a mystery that the Hohokam Tribe no longer exist.

This article reflects on how the Hohokam tribe farmed in the desert, and how this tribe used their unique skills to build housing and crafts.

Hohokam Tribe Participating In A Physical Ball Game

This picture displays the Hohokam tribe in a physical sporting event. PETER V. BIANCHI/National Geographic Creative
This picture displays the Hohokam tribe in a physical sporting event. PETER V. BIANCHI/National Geographic Creative | Source

The Hohokam Way Of Life

The Hohokam's resided in what is now known as the Tucson Basin located in Arizona. Their name stems from a Pima term which means "Those Who Have Vanished.

Archaeologists conclude that the Hohokam Tribe moved from Mexico to Arizona around 300 B.C. in which during that time the tribe set up society along the Gila and Salt Rivers.

This Map Shows The Hohokam Tribe Settlement And Includes The Anazasi, and Mogollon Settlements

Hohokam Settlement
Hohokam Settlement | Source

Evidence For Human Occupation of The Tucson Basin

 Evidence for human occupation of the Tucson Basin in the first millennium B.C. http://www.archaeologysouthwest.org/what-we-do/information/exhibits/clearwater/clearwater-photo-gallery/photo-gallery-clearwater-site-5/
Evidence for human occupation of the Tucson Basin in the first millennium B.C. http://www.archaeologysouthwest.org/what-we-do/information/exhibits/clearwater/clearwater-photo-gallery/photo-gallery-clearwater-site-5/ | Source

The Hohokam's Farming Strategy In The Desert

The Hohokam Tribe were skilled farmers who knew how to grow corn and cotton. When the tribe moved from Mexico to Arizona, the challenge they endured was how to grow crops in the dry environment.

Eventually their solution was to dig canals and irrigation ditches to draw water from the rivers to the fields.

The Hohokam canals were insulated with clay, which helped prevent evaporation from taking place during the hot summer months. The Hohokam's also built dams to mange the flow of water.

Constructing the canals was a huge task which took unity.

Jonathan Mabry Pointing To a Cross-Section of An Ancient Irrigation Canal

This image shows project archaeologist Jonathan Mabry pointing to a cross-section of an ancient irrigation canal. Canals were critically important for farming this area in the historic era, and we have every reason to believe that canals also made an
This image shows project archaeologist Jonathan Mabry pointing to a cross-section of an ancient irrigation canal. Canals were critically important for farming this area in the historic era, and we have every reason to believe that canals also made an | Source

The Hohokam Tribe Find Out How To Grow Other Crops

Eventually the Hohokam Tribe figured out how to grow other crops such as, beans and squash. Through the source of a bow and arrows, Hohokam hunters lived of deer, rabbit and other desert animals.

The Hohokam's House & Creating Crafts

The Hohokam Lived In Pit Houses

A Version Of A Pit House
A Version Of A Pit House | Source
A Version Of A Pit House
A Version Of A Pit House | Source

The Base of A Pit House

The base of a pit house is dug 2 to 3 feet deep in the ground. The design include posts and consisted of a roof and walls made of mud, branches and grass.

The pit houses were cook in summer and warm in winter. Eventually the Hohokam's learned how to construct more durable homes, out of mud brick.

A Blue Print Of A Pit House

A Blue Print of A Pit House
A Blue Print of A Pit House | Source

An Illustration Of A Hohokam Pit House

An Illustration Of A  Hohokam Pit House
An Illustration Of A Hohokam Pit House | Source

A Stronger Version of A Hohokam House Made of Clay

At the Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park, you can actually walk through a Hohokam Indian ruin and explore the archaeological site’s interpretive trail. Inside the museum, study reconstructed homes at the Hohokam Houses exhibit and view a r
At the Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park, you can actually walk through a Hohokam Indian ruin and explore the archaeological site’s interpretive trail. Inside the museum, study reconstructed homes at the Hohokam Houses exhibit and view a r | Source

A Replica of Hohokam Pit House On Display At The Herd Museum

The outside of the  Hohokam Pit House on display at the Herd Museum.
The outside of the Hohokam Pit House on display at the Herd Museum. | Source
The inside of the Hohokam Pit House
The inside of the Hohokam Pit House | Source
The inside of the Hohokam Pit House
The inside of the Hohokam Pit House | Source

Hohokam Pottery

Hohokam Pottery
Hohokam Pottery | Source

The Hohokam's Pottery & Jewelry

The Hohokam also made pottery and jewelry. Archaeologists found artifacts which show they traded with other tribes.

The Hohokam's Relationship With The Anasazi Tribe

The Anasazi Tribe were another tribe that arrived to the American Southwest 2,000 years ago. By A.D. 900 the Anasazi had extended to northeastern Arizona, Southwestern Colorado, and Northwestern New Mexico.

Research notes that the Hohokam's may have had a relationship between the Anasazi which consisted of building houses out of adobe which is clay mixed with straw. This clay brick is then left out in the Arizona sun to bake. It is believed that the Anasazi were very informative teaching the Hohokam tribe how to make the abobe brick and build adobe houses.

The Hohokam Ball Courts

The Hohokam tribe enjoyed playing ball games in which they built ball courts large enough for the sport. Playing ball games created a way for the tribe to share family events and socialize with one another.

It remains a mystery that such skilled farmers and gifted builders such as the Hohokam Tribe no longer exists.

Handmade Weapons And Tools

Handmade Weapons And Tools on display at the Herd Museum
Handmade Weapons And Tools on display at the Herd Museum | Source

Hohokam Indian Village

Hohokam Video Shywatchers

The Hohokam Tribe Poll

What Do You Find Most Interesting About The Hohokam Tribe?

See results without voting

The Hohokam Millennium (Popular Archaeology)

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