The Dragon Triangle: Real Terror or Just a Watered Down Legend?

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The Pacific Triangle -- also known as the Dragon Triangle or the Devil's Sea - is like its counterpart in the Atlantic; it is alleged to be a place where ships, planes, people, and cargo have vanished without a trace.

It doesn't have the same notoriety as the Bermuda Triangle, and its origins appear to come from a few articles in Japanese newspapers in the mid 1950s. Still, this second maritime "triangle" has recently garnered attention by researchers of the paranormal, Bermuda Triangle, and UFOs.

Oddly enough, the Dragon's Triangle has another thing in common with the Bermuda Triangle. And, it has nothing to do with the supernatural. Instead, it involves one man whose mere connection puts this legend into question.

First Accounts of the Devil’s Triangle

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The Pacific Triangle is a region located around Miyake Island just south of Tokyo, Japan. The boundary range ( varies according to different accounts) from one point 70 miles off the eastern shore of Japan, to a point 300 miles from it the coast, to another point near Iwo Jima.

The first account of the Pacific triangle started in the January, 1955. Japanese newspapers had reported the disappearance of nine ships within the area between 1949 and 1953. One ship sent an SOS while another was reported lost after a volcano-produced tidal wave hit the region. The other seven vanished without a trace between a 750 mile expanse of ocean between Miyake Island and Iwo Jima.

The incidents, as mysterious and tragic as it was, would probably have been written off as being caused by an act of nature. However, the mystery of this region was soon emboldened by a writer known for researching - and sometimes fabricating - the Bermuda Triangle.

Doubts about the Triangle and Charles Berlitz

The Late Charles Berlitz helped to bring the Bermuda Triangle to the public's attention with his top-selling book on the subject. Berlitz continued with the "triangle" theme in 1989 with The Dragon's Triangle. In this book, Berlitz claimed that the triangle is located on the exact opposite side of the world on the same latitude and longitude as the Bermuda Triangle. Also, he reported that numerous ships and planes vanished in this area, including military ships, a Soviet nuclear submarine and a plane carrying a nuclear bomb.

Berlitz's claims for the cause for the disappearances in this region ran the gamut of various anomalies. Bizarre magnetic currents that caused plane and ship instruments to malfunction, reports of strange lights, volatile weather changes, sudden ocean swells, whirlpools, or thick fog were among the causes Berlitz gave. Also, he speculated - and claimed to have the evidence - that many of the disappearance correlated with sightings of UFOs and USO (unidentified Submerged Objects).

Another claimed that Chinese myth told of a dragon that lived undersea. When the dragon moved, it caused the oceans to swell violently and created storms and heavy fog.

A supposed "tornado in the Dragon's Triangle.
A supposed "tornado in the Dragon's Triangle. | Source

The claims made by Berlitz were the same ones he made in his pivotal 1974 book, The Bermuda Triangle. These claims have added more to the mystery and myth surrounding the Atlantic triangle. Now, his new topic was getting the same treatment.

It should also be noted, that many of the claims he made in his book on the Bermuda Triangle had been discredited by Navy researchers in the matter as exaggerations of facts or total fabrication of certain events. Another writer on the subject, Lawrence David Kusche, also discredited Berlitz's claim. In his 1975 book, The Bermuda Triangle Mystery - Solved, Kusche writes: "If Berlitz were to report that a boat was red, the chance of it being some other color is almost a certainty (Skepdic, 2009)."

Other websites have made the same claims as Berlitz and much more. One site claimed that it caused the destruction of Kublai Khan's invasion force in the 13th century. This fleet's destruction by a Typhoon on the Western coast of Japan spared the Island from invasion. The problem with this argument is location; The Dragon Triangle is reported to be on the East coast of Japan.

Another site claimed that a Chinese myth told of a dragon that lived undersea. When the dragon moved, it caused the oceans to swell violently and created storms and heavy fog. There are other interesting claims: A black hole; remnants of an Atlantis-like civilization that's snatching ships; planes and people from the ocean's surface; a time vortex; and sea monsters.

The Dragon and Bermuda Triangle.
The Dragon and Bermuda Triangle. | Source

Dragon's Triangle Poll

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Whatever may be the case, actual scientific evidence on the matter is few and far between. Magnetic anomalies have been reported in the areas and research on another possibility, ocean flatulence (the release of methane from the bottom of the ocean) has been proven to sink small vessels. However, nothing out of the ordinary appears to be a cause.

Also, official maritime statistics of sunken ships and downed plane in the region is actually unremarkable. Closer examination of the statistics indicate that numbers are slightly lower in than in areas adjacent to the triangle. Still, the area does get its fair share of storms and other natural occurrence -- such as volcanic activity and tidal waves produced by earthquake faults.

Possibly, as one skeptic remarked about the Bermuda Triangle, the mystery behind it is how it became a mystery in the first place. The same can be said about the The Dragon Triangle. In fact, there's a lot that can be stated as being the same with its Atlantic counterpart.

History Channel's UFO Files Take on Dragon Triangle

© 2017 Dean Traylor

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Jodah 4 weeks ago from Queensland Australia

This is another very interesting but mysterious article, Dean. I have heard of the Dragon's Triangle but not read much about it. I don't know if the recent disappearance of the Malaysia Airlines plane occurred in this area. Thanks for sharing.

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