The First Georgians : Ancient Hunters And Projectile Points Of Southeastern Georgia

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12,000 Years BP

It was shortly before sunrise when the hunters took their assigned places slightly below the plateau between the springs. The slight breeze was in their faces, assuring them they would not be winded by the animals grazing on the roughly 40 acre savannah.

The hunters could smell the creatures even before the skies were light enough to see them. Each hunter held his spear at the ready, knowing even the slightest sound, or a change in the wind direction, could alert the intended prey as to their presence.

Finally the sun made its appearance in the form of a deep red glow on the eastern horizon. The hunters knew this red sky meant a storm was coming soon. It was imperative they act before long if they were to have a successful hunt.

At last, the sound of a shrill whistle indicated the signal for the waiting hunters to begin their charge over the rim of the hill and into the area where the herd of giant bison were just beginning to stir from their nightly vigil on the grasslands. It looked to be a good day for the hunters and their families. They would eat meat tonight.

Of Ancient Hunts And Hunters

Only a small portion of the projectile points found in the "cornfield" kill zone used to trap game near an ancient Carolina Bay.
Only a small portion of the projectile points found in the "cornfield" kill zone used to trap game near an ancient Carolina Bay. | Source
A closer look at some of the beautifully formed points.
A closer look at some of the beautifully formed points. | Source
Notice the different shapes of the points found in the kill zone.  The differences in the bases help date the points.
Notice the different shapes of the points found in the kill zone. The differences in the bases help date the points. | Source
A quarter is used to show the size of these hand tools found in the kill zone.  Some were used to extract marrow from the large bones of the prey.  An important source of nutrition to Paleo hunters.
A quarter is used to show the size of these hand tools found in the kill zone. Some were used to extract marrow from the large bones of the prey. An important source of nutrition to Paleo hunters. | Source
Long before these mounds were constructed hunters survived by hunting Georgia's plentiful game.
Long before these mounds were constructed hunters survived by hunting Georgia's plentiful game. | Source

Georgia Before Oglethorpe

While there is plenty of documented history about the founding of Oglethorpe’s first colony in what is now called Georgia, it was not as if this wonderful part of the country was deserted, by any stretch of the imagination.

For over 14,000 years the coastline and interior of this very important state-to-be was inhabited by the earliest immigrants into this veritable Garden of Eden. Even long before those referred to as the Mississippian Culture erected huge mounds of earth we still wonder at today, Paleo hunters made this part of the country their home.

From the first traveler to enter this vast continent over the then-exposed Bering land bridge from Siberia to Alaska, to those who eventually reached the very southern tip of South America, only a period of a few hundreds years is thought to have passed.

When these first nomadic hunters eventually entered into what is now present day Southeastern Georgia, they found the land literally teeming with many species of wild animals.

This dependable and seemingly untapped, source of meat, as well as the plethora of many varieties of nuts, berries, and other edible plants, enabled the hunters to not only survive, but to thrive in this vast unspoiled wilderness.

Clues From Georgia's Past

These two beautiful points are over 10,000 years old.  Used perhaps on now extinct megafauna.
These two beautiful points are over 10,000 years old. Used perhaps on now extinct megafauna. | Source
With the largest points being 4" long, one may see the different sizes of points found in the cornfield kill zone.
With the largest points being 4" long, one may see the different sizes of points found in the cornfield kill zone. | Source
This ancient point was obviously made for large game perhaps 13,000 years ago.
This ancient point was obviously made for large game perhaps 13,000 years ago. | Source

Discovering Ancient History In My Own Backyard

As a farmer, and also an exuberant outdoorsman, I am lucky enough to have found abundant evidence of these ancient hunters and nomads. One may learn much about these intrepid wanderers as they lived their lives around and among the vast swamps and Carolina Bays of this area.

These reminders of their exploits come in the form of very fascinating artifacts, such as projectile points, pottery shards, miscellaneous stone tools, and even some objects we’ve yet to identify. But how does one know the approximate age of such artifacts? The answer may be simpler than you think.

From the age of six when I found my first arrowhead while playing in the garden, to today when I still get a thrill from discovering another ancient spear point in some interesting location, the feeling never changes.

Being the first to see a lost hunting tool in over 5,000, or even twice this number of years, never ceases to please me. Thousands of years ago this spear point was hurled at some great beast.

Whether it hit the target or flew harmlessly into the surrounding brush, the maker of this work of art never saw it again. Another alternative was it did hit its mark, but the creature managed to escape with the point still embedded in its body. But this particular scenario is very doubtful, as it ended up in an area where many other points have been found.

There have been too many points found in this small area for them to be merely random hunting losses or escaped wounded animals. For this present day cornfield is an ancient hunting trap. A kill zone used for thousands of years by many generations of the earliest Native Americans. A very successful hunting spot no doubt, as evidenced by the plethora of projectile points they left behind.

Coming To America!

Ancient hunters followed the wooly mammoth into America across the Bering land bridge.
Ancient hunters followed the wooly mammoth into America across the Bering land bridge. | Source

There Were Giants In Those Days!

Another source of food for the first Georgians.  The American mastodon became extinct over 11,000 years ago.
Another source of food for the first Georgians. The American mastodon became extinct over 11,000 years ago. | Source
Killing a giant animal was one thing.  Keeping it from predators such as the smilodon--better known as the saber tooth cat--was another.
Killing a giant animal was one thing. Keeping it from predators such as the smilodon--better known as the saber tooth cat--was another. | Source
the American lion also competed with the first Georgians and other predators for the vast herds of game of the area.
the American lion also competed with the first Georgians and other predators for the vast herds of game of the area. | Source
Paleo indians stalking a Glyptodont.  Similar to today's armadillos.
Paleo indians stalking a Glyptodont. Similar to today's armadillos. | Source

The First Georgia Hunters

The very earliest of hunters to this land faced quite different circumstances than their ancestors would thousands of years into the future. At this time the forests of the area were predominantly hardwood forests, filled with giant mammals now referred to as mega fauna.

Huge mammoths and mastodons were the prey which seemed to draw the first hunters across Beringia, but there were also other such creatures the hunters sought for food and clothing. Vast herds of giant bison, wild horses, camels, and other grazing animals roamed the early Georgia savannahs and grasslands.

Before the mysterious happenings which caused the extinction of many species of mega fauna, the land teemed with both grazing animals and those carnivores who have always preyed upon them. These include saber tooth cats, dire wolves, short face and cave bears, along with the American lion, among just a few.

Today’s horse first evolved in the New World. These animals then used the same land bridge the incoming hunters traveled to enter the Old World, where they eventually changed the history of human transportation.

This was a lucky thing, as the horse herds which remained behind became extinct, along with the other species of mega fauna in the New World. It would be thousands of years later before the Spaniards reintroduced them back into the Americas,

Some believe Clovis Man may have been responsible for the mega fauna extinctions, but if so, why were the smaller bison and other herd animals still here when the first Europeans arrived to claim the land while the giant bison had became extinct?

A Dalton point.  Perhaps 12,000 years old, but still in great shape.
A Dalton point. Perhaps 12,000 years old, but still in great shape. | Source
One half of a broken atlatl, or spear throwing weight, used to Increase the force of the spear or dart when launched.
One half of a broken atlatl, or spear throwing weight, used to Increase the force of the spear or dart when launched. | Source
Another view of the atlatl weight showing where the hole was drilled through the stone.
Another view of the atlatl weight showing where the hole was drilled through the stone. | Source

The Mystery Of The Great Extinction

Smilodon--saber tooth cats--among other predators such as the dire wolf and the American lion, also went missing from the landscape. In total, more than 30 species of once plentiful creatures suddenly vanished while others seemed completely unaffected.

This intriguing mystery is still being debated by scientists today. Many believe the influx of humans into this world of diverse animals was the cause of the extinctions and not climate change. But this doesn't explain the remaining herds of similar smaller animals apparently thriving at the advent of the European discovery of the New World.

Another theory of the mega fauna extinctions concerns an exploding fireball of some sort--either a comet or asteroid--burning the vast grasslands and forests covering North and South American during this extremely dry period of the late Pleistocene era.

It stands to reason the larger herbivores would have found it tough going with the grasslands being destroyed by the fires, and so would the carnivores who preyed upon them.

So perhaps only the smaller woods dwelling creatures could survive long enough to reproduce. The smaller bison are known to have frequented the forests and grasslands, and the same goes for most of the other larger animals--deer, moose, elk, etc.-- who survived the extinction. Yes, quite an enigma, but I do believe we will find the answer to this mystery before too long in the future.

Atllatl weights shown mounted on a throwing stick and hooked onto the end of a spear, or dart, as it is sometimes referred to.
Atllatl weights shown mounted on a throwing stick and hooked onto the end of a spear, or dart, as it is sometimes referred to. | Source
Illustration of a Paleo hunter using an atlatl to launch a spear.  The projectile is often referred to as a dart.
Illustration of a Paleo hunter using an atlatl to launch a spear. The projectile is often referred to as a dart. | Source

A Diversity Of Shapes

A beautiful Bolen point of an unusual shape.
A beautiful Bolen point of an unusual shape. | Source
A point made of opaque quartz.  This material is not found in the vicinity of where this point was found.
A point made of opaque quartz. This material is not found in the vicinity of where this point was found. | Source
A drill point.  Attached to a shaft and spun with a bow, this was used to drill holes in wood and bone objects.
A drill point. Attached to a shaft and spun with a bow, this was used to drill holes in wood and bone objects. | Source

What The Hunters Left Behind

At the time of the earliest human inhabitants of the Georgia wilderness the sea level was as much as 2000 feet below present levels because of the vast amounts of ice captured at the earth’s polar regions.

The land was much drier, making the sinkholes, Carolina Bays, and springs an important source of water, both for the nomadic hunters and their gigantic prey. These spots are where most of my artifacts are found, further bolstering the evidence of much more arid climes during the late Pleistocene period.

The projectile points found from the late Pleistocene period are much larger on average than those found from the late Archaic and Woodland eras, also indicating much larger prey being hunted during the harsh, dry centuries of mega fauna existence. But whatever their size, shape, or color of stone used for the projectile point, each says something about its maker and the use which it was originally intended for.

This article is intended as a guide to help projectile collectors--whether they be serious or merely hobbyists--get an idea about the age and particular type of points they have found. We’ll examine a number of the most common points ,as well as, those considered rare and often valuable.

This is merely a guide though, it is often difficult to say for sure whether a point is a certain type without a very close examination by a professional, and even they sometimes disagree.

Different shapes of points all found in the same kill zone.
Different shapes of points all found in the same kill zone. | Source

Hunters, past , present, and future.

Just a few of the points found in the "cornfield" kill zone.
Just a few of the points found in the "cornfield" kill zone. | Source
This circa 1750 flintlock pistol found at the same site shows this area was still a good place to hunt thousands of years after the first humans made a kill here.
This circa 1750 flintlock pistol found at the same site shows this area was still a good place to hunt thousands of years after the first humans made a kill here. | Source

How Old Are These Projectile Points?

So you’ve found an arrowhead, or perhaps a few spearheads from the early period of Georgia’s first residents and want to know a bit about them. How can you estimate these aspects of your finds? There are several different things to look for when trying to classify a projectile point and we’ll take a look at a few of them in this section.

In my collection chosen for the first photograph there are points ranging from a period spanning perhaps 10,000 years or more. They are arranged in size from the largest points--used to procure large animals by spears--to the smallest of points-- used when the bow became the hunting weapon of choice in the latter part of the Paleolithic era.

With the advent of the bow and arrow, large points were no longer needed as smaller arrow points were more efficient at bagging whitetail deer, or even moose or elk, for that matter. So as a rule, the larger the point, the older it is. But keep in mind this isn’t always the case, as some points were made larger for purposes other than hunting, some of them perhaps being ceremonial in nature. So we already have one clue to the age of a particular point.

Examples of museum displayed points almost identical to those found in my kill zone.
Examples of museum displayed points almost identical to those found in my kill zone. | Source
Points from the "cornfield" kill zone show the diversity of shapes and sizes used by the early hunters over the centuries.
Points from the "cornfield" kill zone show the diversity of shapes and sizes used by the early hunters over the centuries. | Source
Large points for large prey seemed to be the rule for the earliest Georgia hunters.  Perhaps this point was produced for a giant bison grazing in the kill zone.
Large points for large prey seemed to be the rule for the earliest Georgia hunters. Perhaps this point was produced for a giant bison grazing in the kill zone. | Source
This point--similar to those referred to as a Folsom--is the only such point found in the kill zone.  Estimated age-12,000 BP
This point--similar to those referred to as a Folsom--is the only such point found in the kill zone. Estimated age-12,000 BP | Source
The beveled edges of this Bolen point were made by abrasion, as well as, knapping the tiny cutting teeth with a sharpened piece of horn or bone.
The beveled edges of this Bolen point were made by abrasion, as well as, knapping the tiny cutting teeth with a sharpened piece of horn or bone. | Source

The Shape Of Things To Go!

The particular shape of any projectile point--whether it be for spear or arrow-- tells quite a bit about it’s maker, if you know what to look for. The following photos will give a few examples of projectile points of different ages and designs.

Because of the shape of an arrowhead or spear base, it is possible to date the projectile point since many have been found in locations associated with certain time periods. Archaeological sites with these points in evidence give us an approximate age of different types of points.

Some are well known such as the Clovis and Folsom points named after the sites they were first located and cataloged by archaeologists.

While this article does not go in depth in determining the exact age or type of the many shapes, sizes, or types of bases used, it can give one an idea as to what to look for in trying to estimate the age of a particular projectile points.

Some points may have a base shaped like a dove tail or be corner notched for easy attachment to the arrow or spear shaft using sinew which tightened even more as they dried. Most of the points found in the kill zone were possibly lost after being launched or carried off with the escaping prey.

Collecting these points is a pleasure for me, and hopefully, for future Georgians to enjoy and wonder at. For more info on dating your finds, I've included some great guides in the research source section at the bottom of this page. I hope you enjoy the hobby, as well as, the history of this fascination subject.

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Comments 37 comments

farmloft profile image

farmloft 4 years ago from Michigan

Well-presented and researched. I never thought about a "kill zone" before, but it's very interesting. Many of the points must have taken a skilled hand to make. I will definitely check out your other related hubs.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for reading and for your comments, farmloft. Yes, the oldest of the points are usually the most skillfully made, with the art of working flint and other stone brought with them from the Old World.

Thanks again for your time!

SSSSS


50 Caliber profile image

50 Caliber 4 years ago from Arizona

Randy great write, I have some know to add to my arrow tips now. I've got a 6 pound hammer head stone, with the tie notches, either in progress or a big dude was smashing something with it,

peace,

dust


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for your input as always, Dusty! It sounds as if you have a great artifact there. Most of my hand held stones are much smaller than that, but then, most of my finds are from stone which had to be brought in from many miles away. A 6 pound stone would have been a burden to carry for most of the Paleo indians who hunted here.

Thanks again for your time and input, Dusty!

Randy SSSSS


CMHypno profile image

CMHypno 4 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

How cool that you can find so much ancient stuff in your own back yard Randy. Thanks for sharing such fascinating information about these early hunters and their prey. I have often wondered what it would have been like to be sitting around a campfire in a world where there were no electric lights, and just scattered bands of hunter-gatherers across the globe


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I know what you mean, CM! Sometimes I'm envious of their lives, even though getting lunch was bit of a struggle 10,000 years ago. It is still quite exciting finding something hidden from human eyes for so many centuries and being the first to hold it my hands since it was hurled at a now extinct animal of some sort.

I can't help but try to imagine exactly what took place in the very spot or what sort of animal it was being attacked. It does spark one's imagination, and you know mine is easily sparked anyway. LOL!

I really appreciate your input and time and I need to repay your kindness and read some more of your work, as I always enjoy it. Sorry I'm so lax in doing so.

Thanks again,

Randy SSSSS


CMHypno profile image

CMHypno 4 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

Well there is a lot of evidence that stone age hunter gathers were tall, healthy and lived a long time, and that we didn't catch up again until the early 20th century. It seems to be the beginning of farming and humans living in larger communities that ushered in epidemic diseases, stunted growth and a short life expectancy.

Also you may have had to chase your lunch, but once caught and cooked everyone relaxed and spent time with each other. None of this working until 10pm nonsense.

I am always happy to read one of your hubs, as they are so well put together and interesting - just shows what a flop the big G's Ps are that they cannot see that it is great content!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I agree about the quality of life these early Americans led, Cynthia! They may not have lived as long or had the same technological advances as we have now, but the stress level had to have been much lower.

They didn't even have the common cold until the first Europeans arrived here in the 15th century, not to mention measles, mumps, smallpox, etc. I wonder too if becoming "civilized" wasn't all it cracked up to be. LOL!

About the Big G, I wonder sometimes if HP doesn't have a hand in some of the rankings we receive. I do know they give some Hubbers extra exposure because I've been told this by those receiving it themselves.

I just got banned for a month by the stupid moderators for a silly joke I put on the forums. The last time they did this I blew the whistle on them for rigging the contest for one of their favorites to win. They never learn! LOL! No more Mr. Nice Guy!

Thanks so much for taking the time to stop by, Cynthia. I always look forward to your great insight and comments on my hubs.

Randy SSSSS


WD Curry 111 profile image

WD Curry 111 4 years ago from Space Coast

This is a good one Randy. I am expanding my circle of influence. I will drag this over to my new Facebook account and show you off to my friends.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Always glad to get your opinion on my work, WD Thanks for "dragging " me over to your Facebook account! I hope your friends aren't frightened of asp holes! LOL!

HP mods must consider me such as they've hit me with my monthly ban, this time for 4 weeks. :o

Really I think they were afraid I was going to ask some questions of Simone on the "Ask staff a question" thread! LOLOLOL!

Thanks as always for your time! :)

SSSSS


WD Curry 111 profile image

WD Curry 111 4 years ago from Space Coast

My friends are used to smart alecky little cowboys and ugly old alligator hunters. Well Randy . . . sshhhhhh! I know you can shhhhhhhhh! I am banned for three months for being off task and inappropriate.

I understand the policy and procedure. I will follow at all times in the future.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

HA! It seems the men are the targets here, WD! If I didn't detest the name "Elite" so badly I would ask to join merely for the protection against being banned. LOL!

But you know me, I call 'em as I see 'em! I wouldn't mind it so bad if the mods had the nads to put their name on the ban post. Having anonymous hall monitors seems a bit cowardly to me.

But hey, they always get paid back by me in some way or another. Not too big on turning the other cheek! LOL!

SSSSS


WD Curry 111 profile image

WD Curry 111 4 years ago from Space Coast

I'm not worried. I am busy. Mucho travajo.

Hey! In Florida, you have to give your finds to the state, and they put it in a huge warehouse without even separating the items. The law killed this one old Cracker who has spent half his life digging stuff off of the bottom of the rivers with his bare feet. He can't make his living selling the booty anymore.

They ought to at least have someone categorize them. Why not hire him to find more?


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Yep, what a joke some of these state laws are, WD! Some of Georgia's laws have changed too. Many folks used to collect artifacts from the Flint river about 50 miles from my home, but now I think it is illegal to even remove them from the river. Like they are in situ after being on the bottom for thousands of years! LOL!

So far, I believe it is still legal to pick up points and other artifacts from cultivated fields. At least I hope so, anyway!

I don't know if you saw my hub "Hunting For Hunters" but it is about a private collection of a friend with some amazing finds in another part of Georgia.

I was afraid to identify him because of just such laws, but it is a shame some of these wonderful objects have to remain hidden and not available for the public to see because of fear of being confiscated.


WD Curry 111 profile image

WD Curry 111 4 years ago from Space Coast

I'll definitely read it. Take it easy.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks WD! See you in the funny papers....er...I mean HubPages! :)

SSSSS


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 4 years ago from North Carolina

Awesome piece Randy. I don't mind saying your one of the very best article writers and always have the most interesting subjects from Georgia's history. And what a magnificent collection from the Carolina Bay hunt- wow. Have any bone whistles ever been found? You got the wonder and rush as a young boy in a super region for collecting and have amassed an astounding collection. Great to read more info on how to tell the projectiles age; and cool about the prehistoric animals too. So a projectile with the tip broken off isn't necessarily indicative of a prey hit? Anyway, super exciting article Randy- thoroughly enjoyed as always!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I do appreciate your praise, Alastar and feel the same way about your local and national historically based hubs. I suppose one either loves our country's history, or simply takes it for granted. Though, there's no doubt as to where you and I stand.

No, bone doesn't last long down here in this humid climate unless it is found in a peat bog, and we do have those here too! So no whistles for me yet.

Most of the points I found as a child were unbroken for the most part but after advent of tillervators--similar to a garden tiller but much bigger and faster--used to pulverize the soil for peanut production, many of the points are no broken in places.

If I could only turn the soil a little deeper I'm sure many more perfect points could be found. But still, I pick up some beauties and most of mine are found accidentally and not from actually looking for them.

I would have loved to have seen this field the first time it was plowed after being cleared of the old growth timber. the ground had to have literally been covered with artifacts. No telling what has been removed in the century before I started collecting them.

Thanks as always for stopping by, I always enjoy your take on my efforts and hope for your seal of approval! Beth says thanks for the ghost hub and I'm sure you will hear from her!

SSSSS


joanveronica profile image

joanveronica 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

What a wonderful Hub! I'm so glad I came across some of your work. Voted up and across.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I'm pleased you appreciate the history of this part of the world, JoanVeronica! Thanks for reading and for your time.

Randy


joanveronica profile image

joanveronica 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

Hi again, just wondering if some of the pieces you have found could be checked for DNA content? There is so much new information going around about the migrations in the Americas. My interest is more related to Spanish America, but these locations are all connected when it comes to prehistoric events. Do you have any take on this?


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hi Joan! No, there is no chance any of the artifacts would contain any DNA after being exposed to the elements here in southeastern Georgia. Even bones do not last long here because of the lack of freezing ground temperatures and acidity of the soil.

Only peat bogs may protect the organic objects enough to preserve them. Too bad though, I would love to know what sort of animals these projectile points were made for hunting.

Thanks for the question and for your time.

SSSSS


Beth Godwin profile image

Beth Godwin 4 years ago

Very good information, darling. You always find arrowheads but the only one I ever found was while digging potatoes. LOL Great pictures!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks darlin' but many folks never get to experience finding an object over 10,000 years old, so consider yourself extremely lucky to have found at least one of these beautiful and ancient objects.


Beth Godwin profile image

Beth Godwin 4 years ago

I know how lucky I am! :)


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 4 years ago from North Carolina

Oh, the ravages of aging haha, why didn't i think of this to start! Shared with multiple pleasures and another look my friend!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

LOL Alastar. I've got "Old Timer's Disease" myself. I wasn't trying to spam your comments with my post, but I often wonder at how little most Americans know about the ancient history of their own country. Thanks for the share Bro! Respect as always!

Randy


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 4 years ago from North Carolina

To answer the 'I often wonder' all we'd have to do is go on any street corner in America and survey a few basic questions to a hundred folks; we both know how that would probably go.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Yes, even some who live in my area have little knowledge of the treasures beneath their very feet, Alastar. Nor how long these artifacts have been here or who made them. Ask them about the pyramids though! LOL!

SSSSS


Ask Izzy profile image

Ask Izzy 3 years ago

Wow that is totally fascinating! How wonderful to find all those artifacts on your own land.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

These are merely a few of them, Izzy! Yes, I've enjoyed collecting them since I was a very young child. I do indeed live in a fascinating part of the US.

Thanks for taking a look!


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada.

Your collection and your hub is very impressive, Randy. The earliest periods of man really fascinate me, so your article gave me a lot of interesting facts. I am truly amazed at the number of artifacts you have and the photos are beautiful. What a glorious look into the past. Thanks for writing and sharing this hub.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Yes Phyllis, early man has always fascinated me especially as i find so much evidence of his existence. Whenever I find a spear point I can't help but picture the scenario which took place on the very spot. It's hard to imagine the lives of the people who made them so many thousands of years ago.

I'm very glad you appreciate my collection as I treasure every one of the pieces. Thanks for stopping by and commenting as always. :)


Sharkye11 profile image

Sharkye11 2 years ago from Oklahoma

Wow! That is an impressive collection! I had one arrowhead that I found on our farm. It looked like your Bolen point above, except made from a dark colored stone. Sadly, I lost it when my house burned.

This was fascinating to read. I love anything of this type, and it is rare to find good articles written about ancient hunters in North America. Voting and sharing!


chef-de-jour profile image

chef-de-jour 2 years ago from Wakefield, West Yorkshire,UK

I enjoyed this article. Fascinating to think of those hunters out there with their home made weapons, sizing up the quarry. How skilful they must have been to create these beautiful pieces and then to get them to work! It's humbling to think about our ancestors and how they evolved and adapted to survive.

I've visited several cave complexes here in Europe and the UK where early humans lived. What attracts me is the artwork they've left behind - such wondrous records of their life. Many of these paintings and figures show animals being hunted. Some experts say they painted them out of respect and awe in some form of religious ritual - hard to know exactly - but they are very impressive. As are your photos and descriptions.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Sharkye11--Thanks for chiming in on this hub, Jayme. Sine a child I've always been fascinated by the points we found on our farm, most found accidentally while I was working the land.

It is something special to hold one of these points which hasn't seen the light of day for thousands of years since it was launched at some great beast no longer in existence. I appreciate your time and input. :)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

@chef-de-jour--Hello Andrew and thanks for checking out this hub. It doesn't take a great imagination to picture these intrepid souls hunting the great beasts as a part of their daily lives. I often wonder what tools will remain after we pass on and if our lives will be so marked by them in some point in the future.

Thanks again for your thoughts and comments on this hub. :)

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