The Historic Daniel Boone Home

Historic Daniel Boone Home Photos

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You can see the rectangle shaped holes for guns to shoot through, if need be.  I never heard if they ever needed them.One side of the house.  Daniel Boone Home InformationOne of the buildings in the village below.One of the many views from the home.
You can see the rectangle shaped holes for guns to shoot through, if need be.  I never heard if they ever needed them.
You can see the rectangle shaped holes for guns to shoot through, if need be. I never heard if they ever needed them. | Source
One side of the house.
One side of the house. | Source
Daniel Boone Home Information
Daniel Boone Home Information | Source
One of the buildings in the village below.
One of the buildings in the village below. | Source
One of the many views from the home.
One of the many views from the home. | Source

House and Village

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The herb garden outside the kitchen.Two flights going up.View from a distance of the Boone Home.One view of the village.
The herb garden outside the kitchen.
The herb garden outside the kitchen. | Source
Two flights going up.
Two flights going up. | Source
View from a distance of the Boone Home.
View from a distance of the Boone Home. | Source
One view of the village.
One view of the village. | Source

History Observed at the Historic Daniel Boone Home

Historic Daniel Boone Home and Boonefield Village

I had the pleasure of finally getting to tour the Historical Daniel Boone Home and Boonefield Village today. It is located in Defiance Missouri off of Highway F and about 5 miles from Highway 94. Lindenwood University now owns this whole site and a lot of land surrounding it. They are doing a great job I think of helping to keep history preserved and helping it to be as accurate as possible to the times. That can be a trick sometimes.

Daniel Boone came from Kentucky and was a pioneer, hunter, and what you could call a trailblazer. He had 10 children, 70 grandchildren and over 250 great grandchildren that live all over the world now. He has left quite a legacy and was quite an interesting fellow to be sure.

He came upon this area after leaving Kentucky, as it was getting more and more settled there. He found the area he settled in by traveling in a large hollowed out poplar canoe, rather large! He camped along the way, hunted, and came across Native American Indians on occasion. He found another river off of the Missouri river, traveled up that way, and spotted this land that he finally settled on. He ended up dying there when it was time to go.

Nathan Boone

Nathan Boone was with him on some of his excursions, and learned to hunt and more from his Father. Many of the stories I heard today included Nathan and his wife. You did hear about other children as well. A couple of his sons were killed by Indians, as well as another relative. A couple of his daughters were almost killed as well, but he was able to rescue them days later after Indians took them from a canoe in the river, when they drifted to close to the other bank one day. There are just so many stories, it almost hard to know where to start. It is one of the great reasons to take the guided house tour and the village tour.

The House

The Daniel Boone Home took seven years to build, and we got to see all the levels but the fourth and highest level. There is a fire code rule where there is only one exit, so they can't take the public up there.

We enjoyed the tour very much, and didn't use the inside stairs but ones built on the outside. There are a lot of items in the house, but as the property has exchanged hands over the years, much has been gone for some time, though there are a few pieces and replicas. The "kitchen" and the dining area in the whole bottom level was quite impressive for that time! Keep in mind, this is all before 1880. We could see two of the three fireplaces they used for cooking. One is in the process of going through an archaeology dig and they are finding different things. They want to recreate the third fireplace as it was.

Lindenwood University is doing an excellent job of trying to keep true to how things would have been to this era. I am so glad that the people that kept it before, have kept things as nice as they have.

The Boonesfield Village

One think that needs to be made clear, is that this village you can tour today wasn't there like this back in Daniel Boone's day. What they have done is recreated a period village from that same general time, all before 1880. There are homes, a chapel, and different buildings that have all been moved to the site, to recreate what could be any village in that day in that area. It is simply fascinating.

Some of the buildings they have include, the Squire Boone Home, a school house, the Sappington - Dressel House, an open faced shelter, a dressmaker's shop, the Stake house with detached kitchen, the Old Peace Chapel, potter's shop, the Engeldew House, the Print Shop, a grist mill, and a general mercantile store. There is even more, but you get the idea!

I learned so much, it was great and fascinating to me, but I do enjoy that kind of thing. You get to see a video of the basic story before you go in to the tours as well. You can opt for one of 3 tours, or a combination of two of the three with a small discount. For an adult, you pay seven dollars for a guided tour of the home or village, and you get to see inside those buildings, or you can take a self guided tour of the village with a booklet but not go inside.

Some Things that Stood Out to Me

I found it interesting that there was such a beautiful house built out here when it was, it was probably considered upper middle class we were told.

There were holes in the walls of the front of the house, where they could put guns through to fight off any Indians if they ever came under attack. The walls were two to two and a half feet thick in this house.

The house was built on bedrock. It was from the area, on site.

The realization that life is has so many more conveniences now than before, or reminder rather. Just to cook meals would have felt like a work out with bending over fires, and carrying cast iron pots, etc.

The leading cause of death for women in this time was childbirth and infection from burns.

There was a big judgement tree, where they held "court", and Daniel Boone tried his best to sort out community difficulties and disputes. They have that tree to this day, and keep trying to preserve it.

Many weddings are held at the Old Peace chapel, sometimes two or three a day during peak seasons.

The Historic Daniel Boone Home has survived three fires and two earthquakes. It has some reinforcement now in the basement level of course to keep it strong. You can see where things have shifted. The bedrock has kept it strong.

Finally, they hold classes and different events throughout the year. They even have a Christmas event which sounds so neat. There are classes and camps for kids in the summer. I imagine that the more time you had there, the more you would keep learning.

I would highly recommend going to the Historic Daniel Boone Home if you never have. It is an interesting place to see from a person from that time in history. I have barely scratched the surface of what I could have shared.

For the photos, please feel free to click on them to see them enlarged. Also, you can view a slide show of the photos.


© Copyright 2012 by Oceansnsunsets. All Rights Reserved.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Another view of the Boonefield Village.  From before the 1880's, this is what a little village might have looked like.Photo of old school house.  They said 30-40 fit in there.Picture of the herb gardens.  They included a dye garden, medicinal garden, and tea garden.Photo of heading toward Grist Mill and General Store, etc.Picture of inside the old general store.Photo of the old chapel and other buildings.Picture of the Old Piece Chapel in Defiance Missouri.
Another view of the Boonefield Village.  From before the 1880's, this is what a little village might have looked like.
Another view of the Boonefield Village. From before the 1880's, this is what a little village might have looked like. | Source
Photo of old school house.  They said 30-40 fit in there.
Photo of old school house. They said 30-40 fit in there. | Source
Picture of the herb gardens.  They included a dye garden, medicinal garden, and tea garden.
Picture of the herb gardens. They included a dye garden, medicinal garden, and tea garden. | Source
Photo of heading toward Grist Mill and General Store, etc.
Photo of heading toward Grist Mill and General Store, etc. | Source
Picture of inside the old general store.
Picture of inside the old general store. | Source
Photo of the old chapel and other buildings.
Photo of the old chapel and other buildings. | Source
Picture of the Old Piece Chapel in Defiance Missouri.
Picture of the Old Piece Chapel in Defiance Missouri. | Source

Historic Daniel Boone Home and Boonefield Village

show route and directions
A marker1868 Highway F, Defiance Missouri -
1868 Hwy F, Defiance, MO 63341, USA
[get directions]

B markerSt. Louis Missouri -
St Louis, MO, USA
[get directions]

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Comments 17 comments

cloverleaffarm profile image

cloverleaffarm 4 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

Great hub. Looks like a place I would enjoy visiting. Thanks for sharing! Voted up, interesting, and useful! Oh, and beautiful for the pics!


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hi Clover, thanks so much for leaving a comment and visiting and voting.

The Historic Daniel Boone Home and the village they brought there is such a neat place to go. I am sure you would like seeing it. It is good for me to get some perspective too, besides it just being so interesting. Have a great day.


cloverleaffarm profile image

cloverleaffarm 4 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

I love history, and have considered moving to Williamsburg to be a character actor in one of their homes. I just don't want to be that far from my granddaughter.


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 4 years ago from United States

Excellent hub. Can you imagine living in a home where safety is your number one requirement, with holes to shoot rifles. I enjoyed learning more about Daniel Boone. Voted up and interesting.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Cloverleaf, its great to meet another history lover out there! I don't blame you for not wanting to be far from your granddaughter, I would be the same way. Thank you for your comment.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hi Pamela, thank you very much. I can't imagine living in a place where safety was the number one concern. I also was wanting to learn more about Lewis and Clark and their adventures. I think people don't realize what they risked and how dangerous it was. I wonder too if there are more amazing people like these guys, and their families, but maybe they just didn't ever make it. So nothing could be written about them.

Thanks for your visit and vote. Have a great evening.


Ms Dee profile image

Ms Dee 4 years ago from Texas, USA

Excellent hub with great photos! Would be an interesting place to visit. Would learn a lot. I wonder why the limestone walls were so thick. (2.5 ft)


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hi Ms. Dee, thank you very much! The Old Boone home was indeed a very interesting place to visit, I hope you can maybe do so sometime. I am not sure why the limestone walls were so thick, other than that it sounded like they thought it would offer more protection against possible invaders, etc. It was mentioned around the same time that the holes in the walls were mentioned, for shooting at enemies. (They mentioned Indians, but I never heard that they needed to use those holes for that purpose.) Good question though.

I appreciate your comment and visit here, thank you.


Ms Dee profile image

Ms Dee 4 years ago from Texas, USA

Interesting. So maybe its structure resembled forts for protection. Okay, that certainly makes sense :).


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

A brilliant hub and here's to so many more for us both to share on here.

Take care

Eddy..


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hello Eddy, well thank you very much! Yes, there is always so much more for us to be sharing on here, and that is something I love. Thanks for stopping by and I wish you a very happy day. Paula


cloverleaffarm profile image

cloverleaffarm 4 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

Could the walls have been thick due to weather? I would think it would keep the house warmer in winter, and cooler in summer. When I read that, I immediately thought I wish my walls were that thick to help with the winter cold. Just an idea.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hi Clover, yes that could be also, for they did speak of the cold winters here and there. We have it so much easier today. I imagine that it could only help with insulation, keeping the warmth in, or the heat out, etc.

Without their knowing it at the time, the thick walls could be why it is still standing after 3 fires and two earthquakes. What might seem overkill could have several uses as we are seeing. Thanks for the discussion ladies. I find it all very interesting. Makes me wish my house had such thick walls of stone! That would be cool.


cloverleaffarm profile image

cloverleaffarm 4 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

As long as a house is built correctly, and taken care of, it will last for years. Part of my house was built in 1792ish. Still has the original gun stock corner columns and everything. I can "feel" the history, as this was the original homestead. The rest of my house was built in 1822. We are figuring it took 22 years to save and build it.

I think I was born in the wrong time. I like life back then...lol.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Clover, that is neat that part of your house was built in 1792 and still there. I know many houses can last years, but centuries? That is amazing if so, especially when hard times hit like fires and earthquakes. Those things, and the time really put a house to the test.

I like the idea of living in a very sturdy house such as this, it just seems smart, though a bit cold with the stone in the winter! It would be a neat thing to learn more about.


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago

It was really fascinating to learn more about Daniel Boone and his homestead. I hope to visit it one day as you have my interest piqued. Thank you for the journey. I enjoyed it.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hi James, I am so glad you enjoyed learning more about Daniel Boone and his homestead in Missouri. If you ever get the chance, I would highly recommend visiting as it is really a neat place in the Midwest. Thanks for stopping by and commenting, I appreciate it!

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