Truth and Absolute Truth — Finding and Recognizing Proof

Reaching for Truth

Philosophers have long reached out for truth and the meanings of things.
Philosophers have long reached out for truth and the meanings of things. | Source

Yes, truth exists. Absolute truth along with it. And yes, it's possible to prove both, too.

A clue can be found in what Jesus said on the subject — that if you know the truth, the truth will set you free. Truer words were never spoken.

First, it helps to have had some experience with creation and what the Buddhists (and Scientologists) call as-isness (or as-it-isness).

Our languages are so physical reality based that it's a little difficult to talk about something that is superior to all this stuff we see so clearly with our human eyes. So, don't look to the literal meaning of what I'm saying here, but to the meaning that the human words are pointing to. If you don't understand, give it a few lifetimes. You'll come around.

The Nature of Creation — The Thought Behind Truth

Creation occurs when an idea is considered and is pictured with perfect confidence and utter humility. Another way to look at this humility is to consider a complete lack of self-concern.

But creation itself has no persistence. The object of creation exists only while it is being created, unless a "lie" is added. This lie is merely a withdrawal of one's responsibility for having created it. This is the opposite of the "truth" of that object or condition.

When you add such a lie, an object gains persistence. It goes from zero persistence to infinite persistence in the time stream. It effectively rotates into the time stream. I have accomplished this numerous times.

Artists have tried to capture the idea of creation for hundreds of years. This painting by Michelangelo is the quintessential image of creation, but the truth of creation is nothing physical, so it can never be painted.
Artists have tried to capture the idea of creation for hundreds of years. This painting by Michelangelo is the quintessential image of creation, but the truth of creation is nothing physical, so it can never be painted. | Source
Einstein spent most of his life searching for a form of "absolute truth" with which he felt he could explain the entire universe. This was his unified field theory which was never completed.
Einstein spent most of his life searching for a form of "absolute truth" with which he felt he could explain the entire universe. This was his unified field theory which was never completed. | Source

Locating Truth Will Set You Free

When you locate the truth of an object or condition, the object or condition ceases to have persistence. This effectively rotates it from infinite persistence back to zero. The next moment, you have moved out of the instantaneity of its existence and you are "free" of it.

The actual state of mind for both creation (persistoring) and as-ising includes love and perfect confidence (faith). When you love all others and wish for them everything that they desire, you effectively return to the state of oneness which is the source of creation.

By extension, absolute truth would be knowing (and taking responsibility for) everything. At such point, the universe would disappear, everything reducing to an instantaneity of creation.

But do you really want to "prove" absolute truth? Where's the fun in that? Can't we merely be satisfied with the truth of individual objects and conditions? Such "minor" freedom is miracle enough.

Forgiveness Helps Us Find the Truth of Our Source of Resentment

Source

Book: The Art of Forgiveness

Finding the truth of the source of your resentment can be easy if you know how. The Art of Forgiveness, by Rod Martin, Jr., will give you the exact ingredients needed.

It all started with a series of miracles in 1977. One of those miracles involved pure forgiveness which converted rage into bliss, and resentment into love.

Get your copy today: The Art of Forgiveness, by Rod Martin, Jr.

Truth Experience

Have you ever experienced miracles, creation or true forgiveness?

  • Yes
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  • I don't believe in such things.
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11 comments

Buildreps profile image

Buildreps 2 years ago from Europe

Rod, interesting thoughts. I don't believe that absolute truth can be proven form our relative low perception. There are at least eleven dimensions 'above us' like described in the String theory.

It implies that in these other dimensions exist other 'truths' that trickles down from above to below that we sometimes perceive but mostly not. These perceptions that we inconsistently witness are not consistent with our understanding of the physical world we know.

Interesting issue..


lone77star profile image

lone77star 2 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Buildreps, thanks for the comments and insights. I agree. In our current, human form, we will never know such an absolute. We will need to shed the separation that divides us through Ego (self-concern). And there may be many other layers of occlusion which blind us in the spiritual realm -- above the 11 dimensions of physical reality.

Such truth would encompass not only the physical details of those other dimensions, but also the source intentions behind the persistoring of physical reality.


Mike Marks profile image

Mike Marks 2 years ago

I've often thought about something I read once about "can we know that our car is not alive? when we can only perceive its appearance on a certain sensual level while its actuality, the source that rises that appearance to our sensual level, is an actuality beyond our senses." So fixing a car, for instance, can have a psycological effect, or else the car may also be an extension of our own body/mind/life that we get to externally work on.

Like Granny Clampett, I often look at external appearances of things as extensions from such sources, signs and so on, though when I did go too deeply into that stuff my son warned me about finding conception confusion in pattern recognitions. As geniuses are great at pattern recognition, an IQ test basically being a test of recognizing patterns, I saw in my son's statement how genius and madness overlap, and that to maintain the former without the latter I should be vigilent toward being skeptical of what I conclude from recognizing patterns (regarding coincidences)

In Philosophy 101 during my freshman college years, I discovered there are at least 5 "Truths", absolute being only one of them, the one that is unaccessable to our low level senses, so it may only be regarded as speculation and entertainment. Accessible truths I perfer to deal with today are "workable truth" and "useful truth" (the other two truths, if I recall right, are "relative truth" and "coherent truth"


lone77star profile image

lone77star 2 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Thanks, Mark. An entertaining and enlightening comment.

I disagree with your take on madness, but that's an entirely different topic. Recognizing differences, similarities and identities may be a good measure of intelligence, at least from a qualitative standpoint. Those who deal only with identities tend to be more insane. A perfect example of this might be the bureaucrat who cannot think outside the box and forces people into pigeonholes destructively.

Ego can corrupt intelligence. Certainly madness can come from too much self-concern in command of one's observational skills and thinking processes.

Attachment to "relative truths" can also be destructive (insane). One person might learn something and it's true enough that it works for them, but it may not apply to every situation. Insisting that it is "absolute" when it's only "relative" truth can have disastrous results.

I agree that absolute truth is highly inaccessible to our physical brains and never will be accessible to that. But as spiritual beings, there remains the possibility that one day such an absolute will be accessible, theoretically.

On the subject of skepticism, I've come to view this current paradigm of science as broken. It can be effective on purely physical phenomena, but it becomes dangerously destructive when applied to spiritual effects (creational, paranormal, etc). I discuss the relations between science and religion/spirituality in the following article:

http://thebibleshiddenwisdom.com/science_and_relig...

There I use "religion" loosely to include only the purely spiritual, and not the dogmatic and ritualistic.

But skepticism can prove destructive when ego gets too involved. I discuss this more deeply at,

http://criticalthinkingearth.com/skepticism.php


Mike Marks profile image

Mike Marks 2 years ago

I agree that madness can result from attachment to identity. I'm a former nyc actor. I equate ego with character, a character role that we can't turn off. One of my reasons for studying acting was to learn to take characters off and on with a goal of being able to do the same with the character Mike Marks (actually Mike Cicirelli) I was responding to all situations according to.

I've talked to some apparently mad people who, for instance, could lay out a logical thought pattern why pigeons are from outer space and want to eat her toes because they're gold. Strong logic, difficult to argue with her, but still obviously mad. Sometimes perfect logic can extend from a first assumption circling from A to Z and back to A flawlessly, but still crazy as a bedbug. Logic does not equal truth. But I suppose lawyers already know that.

I believe "critical thinking" is the most important subject that may be taught in school.


Mike Marks profile image

Mike Marks 2 years ago

Maybe I'll qualify our point of disagreement this way. Genius, or rather a great talent for seeing patterns, can become madness when the thinker is deficient in the tenets of critical thinking/analysis.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 2 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Wow! Mike, I'm blown away by your analysis. I've learned some new things here. Thank you for your persistence. I feel like a kid at Christmas. Thanks!

I understand your use of ego as character, but my use is subtly and critically different. I use ego the way the Buddhists use it -- as separateness and self-concern. Those who think of "me-me-me," and "what's in it for me?" This is the opposite of the Enlightened love of which Christ spoke.

I love the internal "logic" of the misperception of reality -- alien pigeons targeting gold-laden toes. Hilarious and sad.

Logic is a great tool, but does have its drawbacks. Thanks for helping me to see a few more distinctions here. One I've long considered is the logic of holding the source of resentment close. Such a lack of forgiveness seems logical, but in the bigger scheme of things results in self-destruction -- slow and painful.

Critical thinking is so important and not taught well enough in American schools (and likely most schools in the world). But coupled with critical thinking needs to be critical perception, not only of the environment, but also of the nature of ones own thoughts and assumptions. Our experiences can act as filters on our perception and thus can affect what we think.

Take 9/11, for instance. The tragedy in NYC held us all spellbound and a bit numbed by its enormity. Our tender minds were vulnerable to all manner of input during those first few weeks. The mainstream media had the entire event and conclusions about it all prepackaged. This became our new reality. The pundits "knew" who did it within minutes. This became our "truth."

Fast forward a decade. I learn from a friend here on HubPages that things are not always as they seem. I knew that. But, he said, 9/11 was one of those illusions. Most of us did not take the time to investigate more deeply, because we thought we had all we needed. Anything else is a "conspiracy theory," as if such things are detrimental to your mental health. But alarms of critical thinking go off when you realize that "conspiracies" are a common, everyday experience, and that theories about them are not always crazy especially when they're based on fact. Scientist use theories all the time. The subconscious taboo evaporates like so much smoke.

But even critical thinking is not the end all, be all of Truth. Sometimes our best critical thinkers do not have all the information they need. Their well-considered answers may still be wrong. But critical thinking increases our chances of being right.

You might enjoy another article on critical thinking:

http://hubpages.com/education/Do-You-Use-Critical-...

And one on 9/11:

https://soapboxie.com/world-politics/Uncomfortable...

And, thanks again, for a delightful conversation. I have strong opinions based on a lifetime of experience, but I also retain enough humility and hunger to learn new things. Thanks for filling my cup with newness. I look forward to more learning and sharing.


ubrish profile image

ubrish 2 years ago from Pakistan(Asia)

Yes ,you are right,Truth always exists.we just need to find out it


lone77star profile image

lone77star 2 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Thank you, ubrish.


DDE profile image

DDE 22 months ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

A true meaning about life and you handle this title so perfectly.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 22 months ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Thanks, DDE. It's almost as if I had nothing to do with writing this and everything to do with it at the same time. Ego self (self-concern) was locked out, and True Self (love) was plugged in.

Glad you liked it.

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