Weird Animals – the Tree Shrew and its Poo

Treesha - the Tree Shrew
Treesha - the Tree Shrew
Dung Beetle
Dung Beetle | Source

Weird Animals – the Tree Shrew and its Poo

No, I am not referring to the shrew in Shakespeare’s “Taming of the Shrew.” That shrew referred to a shrill, scolding woman. This shrew is a tree shrew, a small mammal that lives in the mountains of Borneo.

You won’t believe what I am about to tell you about the relationship between the tree shrew’s poo and the Giant Montane Pitcher plant.

If you have read my “Weird Animals – the Dung Beetle,” you are aware of the proclivities of this ingenious beetle.

It discovers and transports the dung of large animals for both its home and its sustenance. But the tree shrew takes its poo to a whole ‘nother level.

You are probably already aware of my supernatural ability to converse with animals. But now I have also mastered the tremendous talent of telepathic transportation. So here I am in the mountains of Borneo in Southeast Asia looking for a voluble tree shrew to interview. Aha – there is a likely specimen.

Borneo, located southwest of the Philippines, is the third largest island in the world (287,000 square miles) and the largest island of Asia. It is divided into regions governed by Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei.

Big Mac
Big Mac | Source

Interview with Tree Shrew

me – Good morning, Mr. Tree Shrew. Do you have a few moments for an interview?

Tree Shrew – If you will publish my photo – I’m unattached currently and seeking companionship – I’ll be happy to oblige you. And it’s Ms. Tree Shrew. You can call me Treesha.

me – Thank you, Treesha. Are there many more tree shrews like you?

Treesha – Actually, about 19 species altogether (of the family Tupaia).

me – I was very surprised, Treesha, to learn that scientific studies now indicate that tree shrews are more closely related to primates than to rodents.

Treesha – That is absolutely correct. We also have the highest brain to body mass ratio of any mammal including humans.

me – You know, you resemble somewhat a squirrel, or even a cute half-pound mouse. No offense.

Treesha – None taken. I hear that all the time. But we do not have whiskers and we do not eat nuts – we eat insects, small lizards and fruit. We have tiny sharp claws on our hands and feet for grasping trees (like monkeys).

We also have a pair of extra tongues beneath our main tongue. These are also found in lemurs – the primates that evolved before monkeys and apes.

Did you know that we are diurnal – active during daylight, with an internal temperature close to the 98.6 degrees that is normal for humans? To maintain that temperature and our active lifestyle, we must eat our average body weight in food each day.

me – Which is … ?

Treesha – … about seven and a half ounces – the size of one McDonald’s Big Mac.

me(astounded) How do you know about the Big Mac?

Treesha – I once ate one lost by a mountain hiker. Couldn’t eat another drop of food for the rest of the day.

me – What about housekeeping? Does your male counterpart chip in?

Treesha – Our mates are well trained. They construct two separate nests – one for Mom and Dad and one for the tiny offspring. They build the nests in trees, under roots, or in hollow bamboo and fill them with dry leaves.

When I have babies (up to three), I will visit them every two days to nurse for ten to fifteen minutes. That’s it. They are on their own after one month.

Giant Montane Pitcher Plant

Nepenthes rajah
Nepenthes rajah | Source

The Giant Montane Pitcher Plant and the Poo Connection

me - Let’s digress for a moment and discuss the evolution of the Giant Montane Pitcher Plant before we get to the Poo Connection. Pitcher plants are the largest carnivorous plants, and the largest specimens are found right here in the mountains of Borneo.

Treesha – That’s true. The plant known as Nepenthes rajah is believed to be the largest meat-eating plant in the world. It grows a pitcher that can hold over two quarts of water if filled to the brim.

me – I know that nitrogen is a very important element for plants. But although the atmosphere contains vast quantities of nitrogen, plants cannot absorb it directly from the air.

Treesha – Exactly! They get it through their roots after oxygen atoms have been added to form nitrates. The pitcher plants then metabolize through a process known as the nitrogen cycle.

me – But tropical soils are notoriously lacking in this substance – they can’t recycle nitrates from decaying leaves as in more temperate climates. One of the reasons why farmers rely on so much fertilizer to supplement the soil.

Treesha – You seem to be so knowledgeable. Do you have a degree in Agriculture?

me – No, I have a B.A.H. – Bachelors in Animal Husbandry. Sorry, the debbil made me do it.

Treesha – I understand. If I had attended college it would have been to attain my M.R.S.

me – Touche! So how do these pitcher plants obtain nitrogen?

Treesha – Wait ‘til you hear this. The colors of the pitcher plants are arranged to attract insects. They broadcast wavelengths that can be seen like lighthouse beacons. The insects provide the plant with vital nitrogen and phosphorus, which it cannot obtain any other way.

me – How?

Treesha – When insects land on pitcher plants, they cannot adhere to the surface. They slip and slide into a pool of digestive enzymes where they drown and are ingested by the plant.

Mt. Kinabalu (4095m) is one of the tallest mountains in South-East Asia and is situated in the Kinabalu National Park in the province of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo.

The Poo Connection

me – So what is this poo connection between the tree shrew and the carnivorous pitcher plant?

Treesha – Here on Mt. Kinabalu insect prey is scarce. The largest meat-eating aerial plant in the world has been designed not to eat small animals like tree shrews or rodents, but small animal poo (feces).

me – Are you saying that the Giant Montane Pitcher Plant on Mt. Kinabalu, Borneo has evolved into a toilet for the tree shrew? A shrew loo?

Treesha – Exactly! Botanists have discovered that this giant pitcher plant has a pitcher the exact same size as a tree shrew's body. The plant uses tasty nectar to attract tree shrews, and then ensures its pitcher is big enough to collect the feeding mammal's droppings.

me – C’mon, are you putting me on?

Treesha – I swear this is true. Picture this scenario. A small tree shrew climbs up to lick the concave lid of the, shall we say, ‘toilet plant.’ The inside of this lid is covered with glands that exude huge amounts of nectar. Busily engaged in slurping down the delicious, sweet nectar that lines the plant’s ‘lid,’ the tree shrew does his or her business in the bowl of the pitcher plant.

Great symbiosis. A sweet, liquid free lunch for the tree shrew and a nice, although some might say ‘crappy,’ deposit for the plant which likely supplies the majority of nitrogen required.

Here’s the video with the proof.

Toilet Plant with Tree Shrew ... on Pot

Nepenthes rajah (D) is the Giant Montane Pitcher Plant

Treesha – Now here’s the clincher. The distance from the front of the pitcher's mouth to the glands on the lid corresponds exactly to the head to body length of the mountain tree shrew.

For the tree shrews to reach the sweet nectar, they must climb onto the pitcher and perch in such a way that their backsides are located over the mouth of the pitcher. Then they do what they gotta do and defecate to mark their feeding territory. Before they leave, they usually mark the plants with their scent by rubbing their genitals onto the lid.

me(doubtful) But ground-lying, terrestrial pitcher plants have slippery rims to trap insects.

Treesha – That’s what is so amazing. The rim of the aerial type of Giant Montane Pitcher Plant has been modified so that it is not slippery like the insect-trapping varieties. That way, tree shrews stay safe from a spill while eating and pooping.

me – What prevents the tree shrew from, you’ll pardon the expression, missing the hole, so to speak?

Treesha – There's no way for that to happen. The shape of the pitcher opening and orientation of the leaf lid, coated with nectar, ensure that a tree shrew will have to straddle the plant. Ergo, the animal is in the perfect position to take a bathroom break while feeding.

me – And when it rains, the poop will be washed into the bottom of the plant pitcher. What an extraordinary example of plant/animal specialization.

Thank you, Treesha, for enlarging my environmental education. Would you like me to bring you a dozen Big Macs when I return next year?

Treesha – No thanks, I’m watching my diet. But a mini iPad would come in handy! (laughs hysterically)

Carpenter Ant (Campanotus schmitzi)
Carpenter Ant (Campanotus schmitzi) | Source

Believe It or Not

There is one species of carpenter ant, Campanotus schmitzi, that dives into the terrestrial pitcher-plant digestive fluid and retrieves drowned insects and mosquito larvae for its food. These ants can actually swim and remain submerged for up to 30 seconds! Although it may take them up to 12 hours to haul up their catch.

Sources:

Chin, L., J. A. Moran, and C. Clarke. 2010. “Trap geometry in the giant montane pitcher plant species from Borneo is a function of tree shrew body size.”

Clarke, C. M., U. Bauer, C. C. Lee, A. A. Tuen, K. Rembold, and J. A. Moran. 2009. “Tree shrew lavatories: a novel nitrogen sequestration strategy in a tropical pitcher plant.”

Moran, Jonathan A. 2012.”Tuning of color contrast signals to visual sensitivity maxima of tree shrews by three Bornean highlands Nepenthes species.”

© Copyright BJ Rakow, Ph.D. 2013. All rights reserved. Author, "Much of What You Know about Job Search Just Ain't So."


Learn to write a dynamic resume and cover letter, network effectively, interview confidently, and negotiate salary.

More by this Author


Comments for Weird Animals - the Tree Shrew and its Poo 102 comments

billybuc profile image

billybuc 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

You never fail to have me laughing out loud, and this was no exception. I now know all I'll ever want to know about the Tree Shrew and Poo.....thank you for an education I obviously needed. I will savor this for the rest of the day and think of the fine scent of poo as I go about my writing.

You are way too funny my friend. Great write!

bill


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 3 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

I suppose every one of God's creatures deserves to be heard...and although I am quite familiar with the term shrew ( blush), I have never been in such close contact with a tree shrew...

So poo on me...and who the heck knew? Now I do...thanks to gnu!

Voted UP and FABI! Hugs, Maria


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 3 years ago from South Africa

So interesting! I am actually speechless! Nature is full of surprises.... And so are you :)))


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

hahaha what a delightful and insightful read here. You seem to have a knack for interviewing the most intelligent subjects around!

I really love your interviews, as they are really the best around, as one always learns a great deal of fascinating information, plus you choose the cutest subjects for interviews.

I am amazed at your great supernatural abilities. You are blessed :)

Voted up +++++ and sharing

(sharing buttons not appearing, will return)

Hugs, Faith Reaper


CMHypno profile image

CMHypno 3 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

Shrew loos, who'd have thought it? And two extra tongues? Super size those shrews and you've got the makings of a good horror film! Got to say drbj you always write about such interesting things. But it shows how everything has evolved to work together and how delicate the balance is.


JayeWisdom profile image

JayeWisdom 3 years ago from Deep South, USA

You have a Grand Slam here, drbj! Voted Up+++++ and shared.

(The things one wouldn't know if one didn't read your interviews with the famous to the mundane aren't worth knowing.) I daresay you're one of the few who could make this topic not only very interesting, but laugh-out-loud humorous.

Jaye


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 3 years ago from United States

I think you talent for sniffing out the most unusual information is surpassed by none. I mean a toilet tree and little creature that collect dung is more than I ever hope to know. Fascinating and very humerous hub. :)


Superfine49 3 years ago

You are so clever and full of knowledge!


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, Bill. You are way too kind with your gracious comments, m'dear ... but don't stop. So happy I had you laughing out loud, and was able to provide a few new Tree Shrew and Poo facts. Thanks for savoring this. Treesha thanks you, too.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, Maria. Not surprised that you may not have met a tree shrew in the flesh - few folks are that lucky (?) Thank you for dropping by, the poetic comment and the Up. You are the best!


Mhatter99 profile image

Mhatter99 3 years ago from San Francisco

I was reading this and thought Youtube. You should be on T.V. this is great!


epigramman profile image

epigramman 3 years ago

Well no one and I repeat NO ONE, lol, does it quite like you except me, lol. You and I are true originals DRBJ along with the lovely and talented ALWAYS EXPLORING ....... love love love this creative idea and I think they're may be some weird animals lurking about in Hubland as well, lol lol lol.

The most amazing thing I get from your hub masterpieces, DRBJ, other than being entertained and humored on a world class level is I AM LEARNING FROM YOU ALL OF THE TIME and always being inspired too.

Thank you for everything you do including your legendary comments to me .

lake erie time 4:05am canada

and warm wishes from Colin, Little Miss Tiffy and Mister Gabriel


KawikaChann profile image

KawikaChann 3 years ago from Northwest, Hawaii, Anykine place

Nicely done. Pics, vids and very well written. Upvoted/interesting/follow. Peace. Kawi.


christopheranton profile image

christopheranton 3 years ago from Gillingham Kent. United Kingdom

Lovely little animal and evidently quite sophisticated as well.


John MacNab profile image

John MacNab 3 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

Extraordinary, drbj. We could do with a few re-designed aerial pitcher plants up here in the Canadian Senate. Plants that will accept senate members who talk a load of cra.....er....feces, and then let them slide into the pit of shi...er....feces. Excellent, and voted up and across, youngster.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 3 years ago from Dallas, Texas

Cute little shrew and useful too. Their symbionic relationship is incredible and your way of presenting it, very entertaining.


Minnetonka Twin profile image

Minnetonka Twin 3 years ago from Minnesota

This hub is absolutely brilliant. You have such a lovely sense of humor and it makes it so fun to read and learn. Just love the term you came up with, 'shrew loo.' I too think you should get this on youtube. You will be an instant star just as you are with your hub friends. I hit every button here and voted up and will share on twitter and here. Thanks for educating me and making me laugh while I learn.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

You're better than any teacher I've ever had. I learn so much from your hubs. Learning combined with a few laughs along the way ... You make learning so much fun!


Docmo profile image

Docmo 3 years ago from UK

Awesome lesson in biology, drbj, cute, fascinating and with the right amount of yuck factor that will kids ( and us adults) giggle with glee while taking in all this well researched info. You are a wise Jedi, oh Master.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida

I'm going to try to remember a few of these facts so I can stump my grandkids with my new Trivia facts! They think I'm so smart. I'm smarter because I read your Hubs.

You constantly amaze me with your varied topics!

I enjoyed this one a lot.

Voted UP and shared.


whonunuwho profile image

whonunuwho 3 years ago from United States

Very interesting. Even Gary the Gable Guy would find this motivating in one of his episodes. Thanks so much for sharing this incredible information. whonu


ComfortB profile image

ComfortB 3 years ago from Bonaire, GA, USA

I had the opportunity to watch a Nat Geo Video that featured these facts in a Middle School Science Class for which I was a co-teacher. Kids, believe it or not already know these stuff, the problem is, parents don't engage their kids enough to know what they've been taught in school.

Great hub. Love the interview style of writing. Voted up and useful.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 years ago from sunny Florida

Wow, this was probably the most spellbinding tale of poo I have ever read. Who knew??? I learned so much, drbj.

I love the punny way you wrote this but still conveyed so much of interest to us.

Thanks for sharing... Voted up up and away and shared.

Angels are on the way ps


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Martie, you speechless? Nature IS full of surprises! And you so often are, too. Thanks, m'luv for dropping by to meet Treesha.


wabash annie profile image

wabash annie 3 years ago from Colorado Front Range

A wonderful and clever hub!! There are so very many unusual and interesting animals on our planet ... sorry that I was not able to come up with more superlative adjectives but I am sure you know what I mean. Thanks much.


The Frog Prince profile image

The Frog Prince 3 years ago from Arlington, TX

Great interview with colorful characters.

The Frog


akirchner profile image

akirchner 3 years ago from Central Oregon

Amazingly entertaining as always, BJ - and I was trying to jar my brain about this - I know I saw a documentary on this - a famous photographer who photographed the poo and the shrew....of course it escapes me who it was. He is very famous and was a pioneer in photography - especially Borneo...oh well. Poo on it~ Gotta love the shrew loo~ Amazing partnership of nature though and wish other things were so symbiotic - is that the right term....you with your BAH and all that~


truthfornow profile image

truthfornow 3 years ago from New Orleans, LA

Very cleaver way to give us all a lesson in the tree shrew. Voted up, useful and funny.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

What a lovely comment, Faith - a 'knack for interviewing intelligent subjects.' Love it, m'luv. Delighted that you love my interviews, the fascinating information and the cute subjects. I shall endeavor to make the most of my supernatural abilities in order to find additional cute subjects to interview. Thank you for the Up and the sharing.

Yes, I am blessed by loyal commenters like you, m'dear.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

This is a fascinating hub, drbj! As always, I love the addition of the humor to the information. Thanks for a hub that is enjoyable, interesting and informative. I am so glad that you have now developed teleportation abilities!


Mike Robbers profile image

Mike Robbers 3 years ago from London

Great hub! I really enjoy these funny interviews as a way of learning!


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

That's an intriguing thought, Cynthia - that super-sized shrews would make excellent horror film protagonists. We must forward that honey of a money-making-idea promptly to Tarantino.

Do appreciate, dear one, that you find my hubs interesting, and agree that nature sometimes works in mysterious ways to achieve the delicate balance you mentioned. Here's to that balance! :)


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, Jaye, for finding this topic not only interesting but laugh-out-loud humorous. Do appreciate your compliments about my written Interviews. Grand Slam, eh? Love it, love it. Also the sharing and the Up with pluses, m'dear.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Thanks for noticing, Pamela, my talent for sniffing out (much like the lil shrew) unusual information, and finding this both fascinating and humorous. I promise I will not stop at the 'toilet tree' and the Dung Beetle. Have you read my 'Interview with Banana Spider' by chance? That arachnid creature also has a 'fascinating talent.'


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Dearest Sherry - I know! I know! And you, m'luv, are so clever and full of knowledge to recognize that! ;)


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, Martin, what a lovely comment from the Hubpages Master of Limericks. I had considered YouTube but finding a talented, histrionic tree shrew in the U.S. may be the hard part.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

I have to agree with you, Colin - you and I and Ruby are true originals. And I know that there are many more weird animals lurking around - some in forests, some in cities, and some in politics. Sorry, I could not resist that temptation.

Thanks for loving this creative idea, learning and being entertained. Inspiration, too? Wow, I am humbled as well as honored, m'luv. And you are most welcome, my friend. Sending love to you, the lovable Gabriele and spiffy Tiffy as well.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

This is amazing!! Who would have ' thunk it?' Really, i am in awe of nature and you for bringing the most interesting interviews. For some reason, i have no desire for a pitcher plant. ( nil ) Cheers ' me friend....


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Nice to meet you, Kawi. 'Mahalo' for making the trip. And thanks for the very kind words, the follow and the Up. Peace backatcha.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, chris - so you noticed how clever and sophisticated this 'lovely' little tree shrew is. It surely perform clever ablutions. Thanks for the visit, m'dear.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Loved your comment, John, that you could do with a few re-designed aerial pitcher plants in the Canadian Senate. I feel the same way about our U.S. administration. There has been one cra ..., I mean, messy scandal after another erupting in D.C. of late. Thanks for the Excellent and the Up vote, m'dear.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, Peg. Yes, the tree shrew is not only cute but extremely useful in its incredible symbiotic relationship with the aerial Pitcher Plant. Thank you for finding my presentation of its story entertaining.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, Linda, for finding this hub absolutely brilliant. Delighted to learn that you enjoy my lovely sense of humor. As well as the term, 'shrew loo.' YouTube is a great medium but I have been thinking of putting all my interviews together in an eBook instead.

Thanks for for hitting all the buttons, the sharing and the Up. You ARE a true Hubbuddy. The laughs are on me!


precy anza profile image

precy anza 3 years ago from San Diego

That is really funny! And an interesting interview with the cute, little miss. She could have given you a pitcher plant for a souvenir :) Love the "shrew loo" too. ^-^' Thanks for always entertaining us and making us laugh.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

What a beautiful comment, Susan. I shall treasure it. Making learning fun has always been my goal and it's more than fulfilling to know I may have succeeded. :)


Genna East profile image

Genna East 3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

What a creative and endearing interview…so clever! So Ms. Tree Shrew is unattached and looking for companionship...and I love her name, Treesha. :-) And the part about eating the Big Mac; so precious. What a great way to learn about the relationship between “Treesha” and “The Poo Connection.” Fascinating, enjoyable, and entertaining. Wonderful! Voted way up and sharing.


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 3 years ago from New York

Well you're not the only one enlarging your environmental education! Thanks to you, we all are. Now of course I knew a shrew was an animal but I had no idea about the shrew's poo and the loo!

Only you could write such a fascinating, funny, and interesting hub about a cute little animal most people know nothing about!

Voted up, awesome, and interesting.


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 3 years ago from New York

Well you're not the only one enlarging your environmental education! Thanks to you, we all are. Now of course I knew a shrew was an animal but I had no idea about the shrew's poo and the loo! Not to mention his "closeness" to humans!

Only you could write such a fascinating, funny, and interesting hub about a cute little animal most people know nothing about!

Voted up, awesome, and interesting.


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 3 years ago from New York

I just submitted a brilliant comment but don't see it...I'm hoping its waiting for your approval.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, Mohan, for finding this awesome lesson fascinating and with the right amount of 'yuck factor' for kids, as you so quaintly put it. Your 'wise Jedi' comment is treasured not only for its inherent meaning but because you, the Master of Masters, uttered it. Thank you m'dear.


KoffeeKlatch Gals profile image

KoffeeKlatch Gals 3 years ago from Sunny Florida

I am always greatly amused by your interviews. Each time I learn something.I fin d it different that they have two separate nests, one for mom and dad and one for babies. Not to mention the habits of the shrew and it's poo. As always, funny and awesome.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, mary. Of course your grandkids think you are smart because you ARE smart. And now with this latest tree-shrew-poo info, you can prove you are even smarterer than they knew.

Thank you for your very gracious comments, the Up and the sharing - so happy you enjoyed this, m'dear. Will endeavor to continue to amaze you. Promise!


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, whonu. Well, if the Cable Guy would find this motivating then I have achieved the ultimate in shrew and poo journalism.

The sharing has been my pleasure, m'dear.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Nice to meet you, ComfortB. You are so right. Our kids are often much more aware of science facts and oddities than we can imagine. Perhaps if parents turn TVs and smartphones off at dinner time, actual, genuine conversation could take place.

Thanks for loving my interview style and the Up vote. If you enjoy weird facts about weird animals and other weird interviews, take a look at my profile page.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, padi K. So happy to provide you with the most spellbinding poo tale you have read to date. Thanks for loving my punny yet interesting style. When I learned these facts about the tree shrew and its poo-loo, I could not wait to begin dispensing this significant information.

Delighted you have learned from them, too. Thanks for the sharing and the up, up and away vote. Hope Angels are visiting you.


Scribenet profile image

Scribenet 3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

I would give this two thumbs up if I could! Loved it...catchy title too! Sharing and tweeting! :)


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Nice to meet you, wabash annie. Wonderful and clever are superlative enough for me, m'dear. And of course I do know what you mean - that telepathic ability, y'know. Thank you!

.


SilentReed profile image

SilentReed 3 years ago from Philippines

Nature is very efficient, nice design for a toilet bowl. Treesha appears not to have any problem at multitasking. Eating, poo-pooing and answering your questions. I also admire your determination. It must have tested your endurance perch on a tree limb, or did you conduct the interview at a McDonald?:)


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, Jim. Thanks for enjoying this interview. When it comes to 'colorful characters,' you are the expert - especially regarding those who inhabit the hallowed halls of Congress and the Square Office. Oops! I mean the Oval Office. :)


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

I don't remember who the famous photographer is that you mention but if I learn his name, Audrey, I will let you know. There can't be hundreds who are famous in Borneo photography. Thanks for finding this amazingly entertaining. Those lil tree shrews ARE captivating.

Yes, symbiosis in nature is fascinating - I'm studying right now how tiny 'zombie' worms get nourishment from the bleached bones of long-dead whales. True!


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Nice to meet you, truthfornow. Thanks for admiring my 'cleaverness' in this tree shrew lesson. And thanks for the useful, funny and Up. You ARE a clever commenter.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, Alicia for appreciating my newly developed teleportation abilities. They do help immensely when traveling far distances for interviews. And thanks for appreciating the humor added to the info. It helps make my hubs almost as interesting and informative to read as yours. Promise!


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, Mike. I really do appreciate your really enjoying these funny interviews as a way of learning! And letting me know that.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Can't understand, dear Ruby, why you would not want a pitcher plant of your own. Oh, I get it. It wouldn't be much fun without its tree shrew appurtenance - right? Thanks for finding this interesting interview amazing. Me, too.

P.S. I won't mention this to Tricia - it might hurt her feelings.


habee profile image

habee 3 years ago from Georgia

Wow! I know a pretty good bit about critters, but this was new to me.

A shrew loo?? Love it!


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, precy. So happy you found this funny and interesting. Tricia thanks you for the 'cute, little miss' compliment. She's a sucker for flattery. Thanks for loving the shrew loo, too. My pleasure, m'dear.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

If you have a partner in mind for Tricia who is unattached and looking, just let me know, Genna. If he is suitably attractive, I'm sure a betrothal gift of a few dozen Big Macs would do the trick.

Thank you for the sublime adjectives, the sharing and the way up Vote.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

This is such a kind and gracious comment, Mary, I'm delighted that the commenting apparatus apparently misfired or maybe it liked this, too - so much so that it repeated your comment in its entirety.

Yes, Tricia is looking for companionship and you can see from the photo she supplied that she is not an unattractive lil tree shrew. Your multiple kind adjectives and the Up are much appreciated. As are you, m'luv.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Your comment IS brilliant, Mary, and as you can see it has been approved ... more than once!


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Your comment IS brilliant, Mary, and as you can see it has been approved ... more than once!

Oops! Sorry about that. Now my computer is printing comments in duplicate.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, KKGals. How nice that you are greatly amused by my interviews and learn something different each time. So do I, so do I, each time I publish one.

Seems the tree shrews may have a condo mentality with separate units for the parents and the kids. And they are definitely conservationists placing their poo where it will do the most good. Thank you, m'dear, for the kind comments.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Hi, Scribenet.

Thanks for loving this and the catchy title. Your 'two thumbs up' comment is duly noted and appreciated. Thanks for the multiple forms of sharing, m'luv.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

You are so observant, SilentReed, noting nature's efficient design for the tree shrew's loo. Yes, Treesha is indeed a model of multitasking who never once lost her balance while performing her multi tasks.

To answer your question, the interview was conducted at ground level nearby where a McDonald's site is currently on the drawing board. Thanks for your interest, m'dear.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Delighted, Holle, by your visit and that I could provide some new info about the tree shrew critter. Thanks for loving the shrew loo. Treesha loves it, too.


ParadigmEnacted profile image

ParadigmEnacted 3 years ago

This was enlightening beyond belief. It's always good to find a creative outlet for the word poo. You nailed it.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, ParadigmEnacted (what an ingenious avatar!) Providing enlightenment beyond belief is one of my favorite things to do. Besides that is, finding creative outlets for the word, poo. Nailed it? Indeed!


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

A shrew poo! lol! seriously, fascinating stuff, isn't it amazing how plants have adapted to get their own nutrition for their roots? It does make me wonder if the plant is part animal itself! maybe one of these days the so called plants will say, hey, I am actually a living creature with issues! haha! great stuff drbj, loved it!


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Perhaps one day, Nell, who knows, smart plants may rule the world. They can't do any worse than human leaders who seem to be anything but smart when it comes to solving problems for their people.

Thanks for loving this 'fascinating stuff.' Appreciate your visit, as always.


nicomp profile image

nicomp 3 years ago from Ohio, USA

How you get these little beasts to open up is absolutely amazing. You really impressed that little shrew with your knowledge.

Are all the girls called Treesha or just the sweetheart you spoke with?


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Thanks for the visit and the kind words, nicomp. Happy you asked about Treesha. Actually ALL the 'girls' are named Tricia but the lil sweetheart I interviewed spells her name differently.


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 3 years ago from Baltimore, MD

I did not even know tree shrews existed until now, but how cute. I love little animals like that. It is a good thing I can't find one... I would keep it as a pet. :-)


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drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

They are kinda cute, Jeannie, and already potty-trained, so to speak, if you have a Montane Pitcher Plant in your garden. But you would have a difficult time smuggling one out of Borneo.

Thanks for the visit and the sweet comment.


DreamerMeg profile image

DreamerMeg 3 years ago from Northern Ireland

Great hub, really enjoyed it. Amazing to think that these plants use the poo, instead of eating the animal!


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

How nice to see you here, DreamerMeg. Delighted you enjoyed this. I agree with you, digesting the sweet little shrew would be much more filling, so to speak.

Now hie yourself over to 'Weird Animals - the Banded Mongoose and the Warthog' for another rather weird revelation.


nicomp profile image

nicomp 3 years ago from Ohio, USA

You may want to catch up with the australian Brush-turkey: their wild and wacky way of incubating eggs would make a great interview.


DreamerMeg profile image

DreamerMeg 3 years ago from Northern Ireland

Already seen the Banded Mongoose and the Warthog - enjoyed that and marked it up - just didn't comment. :)


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Yes, nicomp, the male Australian Brush turkey is exceedingly innovative when it comes to building a nest for the wee ones. I'll see what I can do. :)


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Aha! I should have caught that, DreamerMeg. My supernatural skill must have been sleeping. Thanks though for the Up.


nicomp profile image

nicomp 3 years ago from Ohio, USA

I had a tree shrew but coaxing it into the litter box was problematic. It also would not sit or stay or fetch. I suppose that the training of the shrew became a huge production.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

My suspicions have been confirmed, nicomp. There is a talented punster hiding within your psyche. Training of the Shrew? Do you s'pose that's where Shakespeare got his inspiration? Thanks for the laugh.


nicomp profile image

nicomp 3 years ago from Ohio, USA

It has been suggested that Shakespeare husbanded exotic pets he rescued from the nearby Avon factory. Or something like that.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

He husbanded exotic pets? From the Avon factory? Forsooth! Would you like to borrow some of my meds, nicomp.


nicomp profile image

nicomp 3 years ago from Ohio, USA

I think he actually lived very close by the Avon plant. A subdivision called Stratford, perchance.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Stratford, nicomp? Ah, yes, I know it well. It lies just a hop, skip and a long-jump from the town of:

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch in Wales.


DDE profile image

DDE 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

Weird Animals – the Tree Shrew and its Poo so interesting and a well presented hub. The greater fact of weird animals is most fascinating.


nicomp profile image

nicomp 3 years ago from Ohio, USA

drbj, Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch would look good on a stamp.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

Thank you, Devika, for your kind comments - the Tree Shrew thanks you, too. Like you, I find weird animals compelling and fascinating to write about.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

'Sfunny you say that, nicomp, since that charming little Welsh village has tried for the longest time to figure out how to get their name on a stamp. And shortening it is not an option. Perhaps in circles going round and round?


nicomp profile image

nicomp 3 years ago from Ohio, USA

@djbj: I am saying something, that's for sure. Your guess is as good as mine.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida Author

What you are saying, nicomp, is as follows since the meaning of the name is: '(St.) Mary's Church (Llanfair) (in) the hollow (pwll) of the white hazel (gwyngyll) near (goger) the rapid whirlpool (y chwyrndrobwll) (and) the church of (St.) Tysilio (llantysilio) with a red cave (g ogo goch).


ArtDiva profile image

ArtDiva 24 months ago from Yountville, CA

LOL. This was so much fun of weird animals, and who knew about shrew poo and its tree loo. I'm still laughing. Just wonderful. I needed a good laugh. Believe me, this is one fact I will not forget.


drbj profile image

drbj 23 months ago from south Florida Author

Hi, ArtDiva. So happy that the tree shrew and its poo and the tree loo gave you a laugh. Your are so right. This info and the images it projects are difficult to forget. :)

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