A Look Back At The Types Of Work Slaves Performed On Southern Plantations

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Perhaps you have a certain picture in your mind when thinking of the former slaves to which the Americas owe so much for in their rapid rise to power in colonial and pre-Civil War years.

Sadly, images of happy, but hard working black folk singing mournful songs while picking cotton in the snow white fields all back dropped by a peaceful oak shrouded plantation house, is what many of today’s citizens picture in their minds. Sure, it’s quite possible this overused movie scene may have happened somewhere in the Deep South, but it certainly was not the normal state of things.

Slaves were not merely members of a huge group with similar unfortunate circumstances. Sure, some were purchased to be worked in large gangs. There were others of course, who were used along with perhaps only one or two other slaves for other businesses besides farming. Perhaps the worst case scenario may have been being the only slave owned by a poor white farmer, and having to work alongside him as he tended his small plot of dirt.


Never To Return Home!

A plan showing how recently captured African men and women were stowed aboard a 'Slaver" ship.
A plan showing how recently captured African men and women were stowed aboard a 'Slaver" ship. | Source
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Then and Now!

The same tabby slave cabins as in the drawing above.  Located at the Zephaniah Kingsley Plantation.
The same tabby slave cabins as in the drawing above. Located at the Zephaniah Kingsley Plantation. | Source
The same slave quarters today.  There were two arms creating a semicircle with the road bisecting it and leading to the plantation house.
The same slave quarters today. There were two arms creating a semicircle with the road bisecting it and leading to the plantation house. | Source

Land of The Free!

It had to have been terrible for either a male or female slave not to have at least one other person of the same culture and circustance to commiserate with. One can only imagine the loneliness such an innocent human being had to endure.

Forever separated from his homeland, with no one but his master to pass the time with, what miserable lonely nights a single slave must have endured in parts of the isolated Georgia countryside.

Such a poor soul spent long hot days working in the cotton fields, and even longer nights, hearing nothing but the hoot owls and whippoorwills as they sang their mournful lullabies.

Nothing much to hope for other than a day or two of rain to perhaps allow for some easier chores. Certainly there were many prayers made by these unfortunate souls. But prayers were only answered for the white folks. Or so it must have seemed to the slaves.

There's a good chance this lone male slave will never get the chance to wed, or to bear a child, unless by some chance--"perhaps if we have a good crop this year," the master says--"we may trade for a female slave to help my wife around the house".

For most of us today it's impossible to imagine this depth of loneliness and despair. "It's in the past," we tell ourselves. But we still remember it, don't we? And we should. Like the treatment the Native Americans received, this part of our country's history is stamped in blood and sweat. But we should all freely furnish the tears for their misery.

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Toil and Strife--A Plantation Slave's Life

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Slaves newly caught in Africa perhaps being prepared for the long hazardous journey to America
Slaves newly caught in Africa perhaps being prepared for the long hazardous journey to America

Different Strokes From Different Folks?

The historical truth is, there were all sorts of Masters--and Mistresses too, for that matter. For this reason, different kinds of relationships developed between large plantation owners because of the way they allowed their overseers to run the workforce of their plantations.

The crops themselves determined to a certain extent just how hard the slaves were driven, or worked, depending on the way they were used by the overseer to get the desired results.

Some plantation owners would not allow their slaves to be mistreated and checked often to be sure they were not.

But other owners seldom visited their holdings, allowing an overseer to have complete control over the entire enterprise.

A look at a few such plantations, along with the various crops they grew, may give you an idea of what was required of slaves on several such southern plantations. .

Frances "Fanny" Kemble
Frances "Fanny" Kemble | Source

A sight for tender eyes!

Fanny was aghast at the way the slaves were treated on her new husband's plantations.
Fanny was aghast at the way the slaves were treated on her new husband's plantations. | Source
Seeking solace in the simple things of life--such as it was--was the only option many slaves had available to them on southern plantations.
Seeking solace in the simple things of life--such as it was--was the only option many slaves had available to them on southern plantations. | Source

The Fabulous Fanny Kemble

The Pierce Butler Rice Plantation --Darien, Georgia

While cotton is the most mentioned of southern plantation crops, it was by no means the only lucrative source of income obtained by the sweat of a slave’s brow. The Pierce Butler rice plantation--located on Butler Island near Darien Georgia--is just one example of a large plot of low lying land using a network of canals and dykes to control the water level along freshwater tidal rivers and creeks. This was essential for producing rice, a very important staple of colonial America.

The plantation house pictured above was where Frances "Fanny" Kemble visited in 1838. The famous British actress and new wife of Pierce Butler-- grandson and namesake of the plantations original founder--Fanny” wrote a subsequent book about the harsh life the slaves led on this island and on Butler’s other plantation on nearby St. Simon’s Island.

Her book Journal of a Residence on a Georgia Plantation in 1838-1839 was thought to have had a major influence on Britain’s decision to not support the south during the Civil War.

Keeping the canals working was a very labor intensive job. The hot, humid climate took its toil on those who worked in the mud and muck of the rice fields. Most of the owners fled inland during this time because of the mosquitoes along with the malaria the dreaded insects brought with them.

Fanny was shocked at the treatment the slaves received on the two plantations, so much so, she eventually left her husband and returned to England where she penned the remarkable journals relating her experiences in the south..

The house where Fanny Kemble stayed during her visit to Butler's Island.
The house where Fanny Kemble stayed during her visit to Butler's Island. | Source
The chimney from the steam powered rice mill on Butler rice plantation.
The chimney from the steam powered rice mill on Butler rice plantation. | Source

The Zephiniah Kingsley Plantation House

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The slave cabin complex today.  Notice the cabins missing on the left arm of the semi- circle.  These were torn down and the material used for constructing other buildings.
The slave cabin complex today. Notice the cabins missing on the left arm of the semi- circle. These were torn down and the material used for constructing other buildings. | Source
The Kingsley tabby cabins during occupation, not long after the Civil War.
The Kingsley tabby cabins during occupation, not long after the Civil War. | Source
A slave's life was only partially their own.  So were their children's on a southern plantation.
A slave's life was only partially their own. So were their children's on a southern plantation. | Source

Indigo--A Color To Die For!

The Zephaniah Kingsley Plantation

A bit further south on the St Johns River--near the town of Mayport, Fla.--Ft. George Island was the site of the Zephaniah Kingsley Plantation. Today it is a wonderfully preserved example of a coastal slave operation unlike most others of its time.

Kingsley believed in a slave being able to eventually buy his own freedom. In fact, he bought and married his wife after first freeing her. Before long, she too had slaves of her own.

Besides growing the much desired Sea Island cotton the southern coastal states were famous for, another important but less mentioned product was produced here.

Indigo dye was a very lucrative product which brought much more on the market than cotton in terms of labor and time. Although processing the dye was not a simple matter, Kingsley managed to learn it well.

Kingsley had a reputation of teaching new slaves a trade on this plantation. By becoming adept as a blacksmith, wheelwright, carpenter, cooper, etc., a slave could conceivably earn his master a nice return on his investments, as well as, future freedom and job security for himself.

But this was only during the Spanish rule in Florida. When the long-time Spanish possession became the 13th colony admitted to the new country, Kingsley fled to Haiti with his slaves where they would be freed, as they had no chance of freedom with the slavery laws incorporated into the new state of Florida.

The production of indigo was very harmful to the health of the slaves when deriving the dye from the plants. While soaking the leaves of the indigo plant in different vats, slaves used their feet to crush them.

This was done so the dye could eventually ferment and form the bright blue substance later dried and formed into blocks for shipping.

It was rare when a slave involved in the indigo dye making process lived longer than seven years.

This was due to toxic chemical vapors a worker inhaled while handling the product. It affected the slave's lungs badly, eventually leading to serious illness and early death for most.

The indigo plant before harvesting and processing into the highly valued dye.
The indigo plant before harvesting and processing into the highly valued dye. | Source
Inside a slave cabin at the Kingsley plantation.  Two families usually occupied a cabin and had access to a fireplace on either end of the structure.
Inside a slave cabin at the Kingsley plantation. Two families usually occupied a cabin and had access to a fireplace on either end of the structure. | Source

Real Plantation Homes

The plantation house where my great grandmother was born and raised before the Civil war.  The plantation itself was also home to over 200 slaves.  This photo was taken about 1897, long after the war.
The plantation house where my great grandmother was born and raised before the Civil war. The plantation itself was also home to over 200 slaves. This photo was taken about 1897, long after the war. | Source
A view of the Kingsley plantation house before its recent restoration.
A view of the Kingsley plantation house before its recent restoration. | Source
Hofwyl-Broadfield Plantation house.  another Rice plantation near Darien, Ga.
Hofwyl-Broadfield Plantation house. another Rice plantation near Darien, Ga. | Source
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Digging Up One's Roots

There is a reason--other than the research I've done on this article--why I know a bit about the work slaves were forced to do on plantations here in the southeastern part of the US.

I grew up listening to the old folk in my family talking about my great grandfather's job as overseer on a plantation which required several hundred slaves to operate during its peak shortly before the Civil War.

He'd only worked there a short time before becoming smitten by the owner's 16 year old daughter. Apparently she felt the same way about my great grandfather. She was sent off to school to allow the flames to cool somewhat, but great grandad managed to find her and they eloped.

Of course, this was much to the chagrin of my now great-great grandfather because he promptly disowned his daughter, pledging to have nothing more to do with her

It was said my great grandmother had never had to do so much as rinse out a handkerchief before she married as she'd always had slaves to answer her every wish.

But she apparently was happy in her choice of marriage, and it really didn't matter because the Civil War soon eliminated her father's wealth and with it, his animosity towards his daughter, her husband, and his grandchildren.

"You can't choose your kin," is a familiar saying in the south. There has always been a part of me which is ashamed my ancestors ever had anything to do with such a horrendous business as slavery.

But I suppose we all have nefarious characters among our ancestors, and we can do nothing about it but make sure we don't forget the bad, as well as the good, in our family history. I certainly never will.


"The slave to be sold was made to stand where all could get a good look at him or her.  They stood upon stone pedestals, as if they were being awarded for some great deed instead of being sold into a lifetime of labor."
"The slave to be sold was made to stand where all could get a good look at him or her. They stood upon stone pedestals, as if they were being awarded for some great deed instead of being sold into a lifetime of labor." | Source

Growing Rice In The Deep South

A dike constructed by slaves at the Howfyl Broadfield Rice Plantation near Darien, Georgia.
A dike constructed by slaves at the Howfyl Broadfield Rice Plantation near Darien, Georgia. | Source
A plan showing the dike system used at Howfly Broadfield Rice Plantation.
A plan showing the dike system used at Howfly Broadfield Rice Plantation. | Source
Fanny Kemble's Journals
Fanny Kemble's Journals

Frances "Fanny" Kemble's fascinating journal of her life on stage and in America. Filled with her eye-witness accounts of a very rough, but colorful nonetheless, view of the south and the institution of slavery.

 
Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839 (Brown Thrasher Books Ser.)
Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839 (Brown Thrasher Books Ser.)

Fanny's book which influenced Britain's decision to halt assistance to the confederacy during the Civil War.

 
Ten Years On a Georgia Plantation Since the War
Ten Years On a Georgia Plantation Since the War

Francis Butler Leigh was the daughter of "Fanny" Kemble This book is her answer to her mother's controversial anti-slavery book and was written after the slaves have been freed.

 

Gratitude To the Slaves

We often forget the roles slaves played during the early part of America's beginnings. Without them we surely would not have been able to fight a war with Britain and grow food at the same time. They were an integral part of our victory for independence, even though they were not included with the rest of the population in this wonderful outcome.

And even after the Civil War when the chains and whips weren't openly displayed, they were mired in a system almost as bad, and in some cases worse, than they'd recently been released from. This was the "sharecropping" system. Some large landowners even paid their black sharecroppers in script or tokens which could only be used at the company store for extremely high priced items.

In this manner the rich land owner even made a profit on the monies he paid out for their labors. Even into the 20th century they were treated as second class citizens, as if they hadn't been through enough already.

When the "Carpetbaggers" bought up vast tracts of land down south they needed cheap farm labor to work it, and the ex-slaves filled the bill. They also were used to chip the virgin yellow pine forests for turpentine before felling and sawing the trees for lumber. Of course, they paid them very little for the hard labor, and now they didn't have to furnish them food, shelter, clothing, or medical needs. A win-win situation for the rich landowners.

So the answer to what sort of work the slaves did is--everything! This even included rinsing out handkerchiefs for spoiled rich girls. Or so I've been told.

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Comments 44 comments

tapasrecipe profile image

tapasrecipe 4 years ago from Spanish tapas land

superb, voted up


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for your time on this rather unpleasant subject, tapasrecipe! :)

Randy SSSSS


CMHypno profile image

CMHypno 4 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

Thanks for a fascinating read Randy. I think when it comes to history, we can't be ashamed of what our families or countries got up to as they were products of their times. Sadly there are still too many slaves in the world today, and I wonder whether we will ever be free of people who think it is ok to own another human being and make them work.


CMHypno profile image

CMHypno 4 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

Sorry to add another comment, but I just remembered that I read yesterday that the reason that it is considered unlucky to carry bananas on a ship, is that they were often taken on as extra cargo on the slave ships. Now large amounts of bananas give off methane gas, and a lot of the poor souls locked in the ship's hold would have been suffocated


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

No, we cannot be ashamed of folks we never knew, Cynthia. And as we know too well, people's morals tend to be less affected when money has a part in the scenario. I do know my great-grandfather (his fiddle was played in my hub "Rosin In The Blood) became a preacher after serving in the Civil War.

But then, I'm sure most large land holders attended church in those days. They had to keep up appearances as being God-fearing citizens of the community. Just as some rich and powerful folks still do today. Nothing has changed but the players, it seems!

I can understand how methane could have been the final indignity to many slaves being transported on ships such as I posted at the beginning of this hub. I didn't show the upper deck of the same ship where more slaves were portrayed as being chained into position. Perhaps I'll add another photo and include it too!

It was said a slave ship could be smelled over 10 miles away because of the filth its inhabitants were forced to lie in throughout the entire voyage. Methane would surely have made the conditions even more intolerable for the captives.

I appreciate your comments and time on this sad part of my country's history. I realize it's not a very enjoyable subject for many readers.

Randy SSSSS


billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

What a fabulous job of research and presentation. Thumbs up my friend and I'm looking forward to more of your great work.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I'm glad you found it worthy of reading and commenting on, BillyBuc! Many dislike actually knowing the truth about these shameful times, as if they didn't ever really happen. I think it's important to look at everything about the way this country was founded, not just the good things. Even if it hurts to do so.

Thanks again for your time!

Randy SSSSS


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 4 years ago from North Carolina

Aw bro, just finished writing a long comment- went back to put in a letter and whamo...no more comment lol. At any rate, you've written the quintessential hub-work on slavery. You write with a full spectrum knowledge of the subject along with your excellent photos to accompany it. The conclusion about gratitude is so true and should be remembered, certainly. Enjoyed this very much Randy, thank you. Btw, one thing that surprised me researching a story was the fact of the powerful Yamasee confederation in Georgia and S.C. being the biggest slave raiders bar none in the late 17th and early 18th centuries.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

HA! I've mistakenly deleted long comments too, Alastar! But thanks for trying again as I always appreciate the insight of a fellow history buff.

I grew up listening to stories about my ancestors and the old plantations. But strangely enough, I would never hear anything said about the slaves who worked on those places. So perhaps there was shame enough to go around, even among the romantics telling the tales.

The Yamasee were a mixed bunch, not only in their tribal make-up--usually Guale and other Muskogee in later years--but in who they fought and stole slaves from. I admire them as they didn't take guff from anyone! LOL!

Thanks as always!

SSSSS


Civil War Bob profile image

Civil War Bob 4 years ago from Glenside, Pennsylvania

Excellent Hub, Randy. Voted up, useful, beautiful, and interesting. You taught me a good bit even though I knew a lot from my Civil War research; especially about indigo.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Glad to hear from a Civil War buff, Civil War Bob! It's good we all learn new stuff about this time period with much of it giving further insight on the real people of the times.

I think people had different feelings about all of the aspects of slavery at the time the war began. Just as they do today on controversial issues. The more things change.......!

I'm glad you found my hub interesting and I really appreciate your input and time! Thanks again!

Randy SSSSS


mary615 profile image

mary615 4 years ago from Florida

As a fellow southerner, I really enjoyed reading this Hub. You put a lot of thought, research and work into this one. I voted it UP, etc.etc.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for your much appreciated input, Mary! Yes, this is a subject I've really researched over the last couple of years along with visiting the featured plantations in this article.

One can almost feel the presence of the former slaves on these old plantations, along with the misery many of them surely were subjected to.

Thanks again for your time and to a fellow southerner who probably heard stories of the "old days" from her ancestors too!

Randy SSSSS


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

Hello Randy, Thank you for this disturbing insight into a topic that is very difficult to fathom. I appreciate the research you've done and the excellent images you've provided to illustrate the bleak and miserable existence experienced by these unfortunate people. I also appreciate you weaving your own personal and family history into the piece. I actually found your profile (and this Hub) by way of a forum comment you made. Regards, snakeslane


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hi Snakeslane! I really appreciate your input on this hub and the time it takes to read it. I can't seem to be short-winded in these type articles as there is always so much to examine history wise.

And yes, my family's history is intertwined in this time period which makes it doubly interesting to me, even if some of it is hard to identify with.

Thanks again for your time and comments.

Randy SSSSS


moonlake profile image

moonlake 4 years ago from America

Great Hub. Enjoyed reading the pictures were perfect. Lots of work. Your right we can't pick our kin. Voted Up.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Glad you liked the article enough to add your comments, Moonlake. I suppose we all have ancestors who though they were doing the right thing, but sometimes I wonder. Thanks for your time in reading this rather lengthy attempt.

Randy SSSSS


prettydarkhorse profile image

prettydarkhorse 4 years ago from US

Thank you for the insights and you the photos you have are good. I read it thoroughly and I was give a glimpse of history! Keep on writing! It is a beautiful hub!~


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Great to hear from you, PDH! I;m pleased you found this topic interesting and it is indeed so to many in this day and time. It is difficult to fully understand the thoughts of those who actually "owned" human beings during this time period. This is especilly so when one's ancestors were those doing the buying of said human chattel.

Thanks again for your time in reading and commenting.

Randy SSSSS


prettydarkhorse profile image

prettydarkhorse 4 years ago from US

Hi Randy, about my comment - sorry "give" should be "given" and "you" should not be there. I don't know what happened yesterday for some reason. The keyboard is stuck, it is working properly now.

I really like the topic, plus it is well written!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

No problem, PDH! It seems I always notice my mistakes after the 5 minute edit period is over too! LOL! Thanks again!

SSSSS


Pamela Kinnaird W profile image

Pamela Kinnaird W 4 years ago from Maui and Arizona

I enjoyed reading your many thoughts on this subject. The photos are very interesting and some are amazing. I've had a busy day, so it's hard to get into the right mindset for this mind-boggling subject, but I know I have watched documentaries on Netflix that were so very enlightening and heartwrenching -- much like this hub. Voting up and useful.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for your sentiments on this sad part of our country's history. Although I usually enjoy my research about historical places and events, this one really hit close to home because of my own ancestor's part in it.

No, not guilt, as I had no part in my kin's actions or decisions regarding the horrible enslavement of human beings. But I believe we all should look at this sad part of our country's greed and ignorance in order to make money by the toil of innocent people.

Thank you for taking the time to comment and for your interest in my efforts.

Randy SSSSS


stars439 profile image

stars439 4 years ago from Louisiana, The Magnolia and Pelican State.

And educational hub in the awesome terrible lives of slaves. God Bless You.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for the visit, stars439! Yes, we tend to forget the suffering of others in our long struggle for freedom.

SSSSS


S Leretseh profile image

S Leretseh 4 years ago

This hub is the very reason I'm on Hub pages. I would hv wrote without a [guilt-tripping] agenda. Slavery existed. The Invasion of the Mongols into Europe also happened (TWICE ! -they had so mush fun the first time). They raped, murdered and pillaged all of eastern Europe. They never took any prisoners. Oh how those European people must hv suffered! On and on the suffering goes in human history, man's inhumanity to man ... The intend of the author here is rather clear: to stir the racial cauldron. His careful selection of adjectives (and pics) to describe/depict the daily life of the slaves is specifically designed to hv the reader conjure up the worse possible image of suffering. And who made those poor unfortunate souls suffer? White Christian people. Yes Mr./Miss White Christian, bow your head, shuffle your feet...and submit here to the author. Repent for your EVIL. Nonsense.

Over 600,000 white people died because Slavery existed - ending it cost over 300,000 Union soldiers their lives. Could the author hv put that fact in this article? He could hv... Oh, he also could hv mentioned that BLACKS ALSO OWNED SLAVES!!!! In fact, about 10% of all free blacks in the South in 1860 owned slaves (in N. Orleans it was 28%!). One of the biggest (and wealthiest) slave holders in S. Carolina was a black man named Mr. Ellison . His son fought and died for the Confederacy. Mr. Ellison was also a notorious SLAVE BREEDER. On and on it goes, man inhumanity to man...

Randy, the pic you have included on this page of the Negro with the scarred back (looks like a burn not from the whip), allow me to give you a little background (I've done the research...so you don't hv to). His name was Gordon. He was escaped slave in Louisiana. He traveled about ten days until he reached sanctuary among the Union army. The closest plantation , and where he likely escaped from, was owned by a widowed Negro woman named C. Richards. She, along with her son, had a stable of over 152 slaves, making their plantation the biggest in Louisiana. Mrs. Richards was also a notorious slave breeder. On and on it goes, man's inhumanity to man.

After the Civil War ended, almost all of the plantation slaves stayed on or near their plantation and became sharecroppers. To prevent starvation of the Negroes after the war (according to W.E.B. Dubois), more than 65 relief agencies were started to provide food, clothing and medical care. From 1865 to 1960, and particularly in the South, the efforts of white people were in fact noble: to attempt to make the Negro people self-reliant. The renowned Booker T. Washington was a major advocate of this approach. When he died, the NAACP's integration agenda took over. C'est la vie ...


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for your comment, S Leretseh. At least you found something I wrote concerning slavery and the black race. Yes, there were slaves owned by other free black men but this has no bearing on the right and wrong of the situation.

The Civil War was more about the control of cotton from the south than it ever was about slavery. Slavery was on its way out anyway since the cost of their purchase and upkeep was approaching more than simply hiring labor.

At the end of hostilities there remained a mostly illiterate group of people tossed out into the world to fend for themselves. And who had they to turn to? Mostly carpetbaggers who had bought up the former plantations for pennies on the dollar, or their old "Massa" both of whom offered circumstances sometimes worse than when they were slaves.

This sorry state of affairs existed well into the middle of the 20th century. I know. I saw it in practice. So, how long should it have taken these folks to gain equality with the Klan and segregatioists running things. Not that you are either of the two. You are unbiased, I'm sure.

SSSSS


LongTimeMother profile image

LongTimeMother 3 years ago from Australia

Hi Randy.

I have long been a traveller by choice and am fortunate to have visited many different parts of the world.

Sometimes, for whatever reason, I have found myself in a place that I can't get away from fast enough. I can't imagine the frustration and anguish associated with slavery. Total loss of freedom and the ability to go home when your heart most needs it would be torture.

Your hub is well worthy of my awesome vote. Thank you.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for visiting this page, LongTimeMother. Yes, it's good to have freedom to compare slavery with. Many never had the privilege.

Thank you for trying to understand the thoughts of the enslaved, it's all we can do at this point. :)


S Leretseh profile image

S Leretseh 3 years ago

Randy is a proud socialist. Anyone who really thinks good ole boy Randy cares about the plight of the black race, well, don't. Randy, like all socialists, cares about ONE thing:: the preservation of his socialist ideology, in which blacks play a key part (more than 95% vote democratic - Randy's political party). Think about these stats:

1) since the democratic party launched LBJ's socialism in 1964 (they first lured the black race into their political party circa 1960 by promises of socialism i.e. the extraction of wealth from the white tax base and given to the blacks thru gov't programs), the black family unit has virtually completely disintegrated - only 37% of black females co-habitates with an adult black male, only 33% of all black children grow up in two parent households and a mind-numbing 70 to 80% of all black children are born illegitimate. These family stats alone are one of the most evil disgraces done to one people in human history, and all created by ONE political party's -the democratic party - diabolical ideology of socialism .

2) the black crime rate has soured. 2.5 percent of blacks 15 to 35 were incarcerated in 1960. In 2011, same age group, under the democratic party's socialism//forced integration system, more than 30% of young black males are now under control of the criminal justice system ...and about 9% of all adults in their prime years( 20 to 30) are in prison or local jails. NO SOCIETY ON PLANET EARTH CAN SURVIVE with that level of non-cooperation. In other words, America's political/economic system works today not because of blacks (the democratic party's people) but in spite of them. Putting it another way, the socialism of the democratic party (Randy's political party) has been a total and complete - indeed inhumane - failure for the black race. LOOK FOR YOURSELF at the inhumane failure of the DEMS socialism on blacks regarding incarceration:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarceration_in_the_...

3) the explosion of black-on-white crime and the overt disrespect today blacks show toward white people is all attributed to the socialists and their persistent campaign of hate-mongering toward white Christians (this demagoguery site included). Millions and millions and millions and millions - countless millions - of white victims since 1964. Rapes, robberies, home invasions, public abductions, murders, massacres, the new 'knock down' game, etc., ... Blacks hv been taught by the white socialists to treat white people with contempt and violence.

Find ONE hub on Randy's sight addressing anything I enumerated above. Indeed, go to any of socialist's blog sites and find one addressing the the above problems. They couldn't care less - other than to say more socialism, more taxes and gov't programs are needed. Yeah, sure thing socialists. Again, Randy and his socialist ilk care only about the preservation of their diabolical ideology.

Also, the scarred Negro pic in this Hub is a photo-shop forgery. Google 'Mathew Brady, Gordon' to find the real pic. Gordon appears to hv been the victim of a burn injury, not the whip. Gordon also most likely was owned by a Negro slaveholder, not a white one. Did I also mention that socialists are unethical and pathological liars? Anything goes to further their ideology, including deliberately trying to stir the racial cauldron.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I'll leave your comments for the time being so everyone can a good look a real racist, one that thinks the black man is inferior and he is himself superior to the black race. What a pathetic individual you are. I pity your miserable life.


S Leretseh profile image

S Leretseh 3 years ago

As I said, socialists are unethical and pathological liars. I hv never said ONE thing inferring or implying racism toward blacks. Nor hv I ever claimed, inferred or implied white people are superior to blacks. You made a claim of racism on my part Randy, now please back it up with something. You expect only socialist sycophants to comment here?

Also, and what do you call the results of your political party's socialist ideology on the black race, compassion? What do you white socialists call the explosion of black-on-white crime, deserved retribution? I want to remind people that Hitler and Stalin were socialists. Human beings are expendable to the socialists. They only care about the preservation of their corrupt and diabolical ideology.

And why would you delete my comment(s) Randy? because I gave you a smack down on your socialism & demagoguery?


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

All anyone has to do is read your profile and most of your hubs, SL. You are obviously fixated on the black race for some reason or another. Why is this so? What are you trying to prove if you are not comparing different races to each other?


HollieT profile image

HollieT 3 years ago from Manchester, United Kingdom

Randy, I admire your attempt to deal reasonably with this individual. However, some will go out of their way to smear you when you raise inconvenient truths, because they can't sensibly answer your questions. Five months is a long time to mull things over. Speaks volumes.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Yes indeed Hollie. it speaks more than volumes about this guy. His type does service a purpose however, it makes one feel grateful not to be so dissatisfied with their place in the world. Thanks for the comment, Hollie.

I even forgive the anonymous mods who decided this hub wasn't appropriate for ads to be displayed on the page. I feel bad for them to be so afraid of Google. :(


gmwilliams profile image

gmwilliams 3 years ago from the Greatest City In The World-New York City, New York

Randy, this is an insightful, historically accurate hub. It is SAD INDEED that the ads were disabled. This hub should be required reading for all concerned. Randy, please write more historical hubs, it will be greatly appreciated.


IzzyM profile image

IzzyM 3 years ago from UK

Randy, if I were you I would take this hub and place it on a monetised web-site of your own.

This is excellent information for anyone needing reminding of the shameful situation America was in, with the slave trade. Your personal insights into it are invaluable, and shows you have not simply re-hashed what someone else has already written (like most of the web).

I also think America needs to be constantly reminded of why the country has a high population of black people. People who have every right to hold their heads high and be treated equally - which they evidently are not, even today. These people built America, not the pathetic whites who held the purse-strings.

Anyway, sorry to go off on a rant!

Extremely well-written and informative hub that should be required reading in all schools.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks GM for taking a look at this hub and for your very insightful comments. History often has a cruel side to it and we must learn from the agony of others before we forget everything that has happened in our country's past or we are due to repeat our mistakes again and again.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thank you Izzy for such insightful comments on a subject most Americans simply take for granted as simply something in our past which most seem to ignore as old news. Yes, the slave trade contributed much to establish this new country and perhaps more than the white people have ever done.

I'm ashamed now that my ancestors had a part in the cruel and inhumane institution and I try to make people not forget these were real people with feelings of their own, despite some of those who make excuses for the cruelty many experienced under the guise of making them "better off" than being free.

Thanks again for making me feel better about creating this article and for your great comments. :)


IzzyM profile image

IzzyM 3 years ago from UK

I've never even heard of Stockholm Disorder? Is is certifiable? I mean, can I claim expenses for having it?

On a more serious note, there is no-one alive today who cannot disregard the crime rate amongst blacks.

They do seem to carry out more criminal offences than whites.

The obvious question is "why?"

Could it be because their whole race was downtrodden by imperialistic whites for generations?

Nah...that never happened.


klidstone1970 profile image

klidstone1970 2 years ago from Niagara Region, Canada

Hi, Randy. What an informative hub. It is quite a topic for sure. I have a little of slave history here up in Canada where I live. Harriet Tubman, best known for her work with the Underground Railroad, did some of her work in St. Catharines, where I live, as it was known as a safe haven and one of the last stops for people escaping enslavement. Quite an accomplishment, and can I say ballsy for a woman, especially a black woman who escaped slavery herself. Thank you for an incredible hub. Take care. Kim.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

@klidstone--Yes Kimberly, Tubman was a very brave lady and I admire her strength and sense of purpose in her endeavors to help escaped slaves seek freedom in "The Land of the Free."

Thanks for your time and input on this article. slavery was a rather sad and unfortunate fact of our country's history. I hope we never forget it.


Motherbynature profile image

Motherbynature 15 months ago from Los Angeles, CA

This is a great article. I appreciate the research that went into this. For a few years now I have been making my family tree. I can't even describe what it's like to see your family name on a slave census document and seeing my second great-grandmother described as a piece of property like the title to a car. Unfortunately I hit a wall when I found my first African ancestor on my mother's side. He was brought over when he was just 9 years old but nothing documents what country he came from. Not knowing my African roots seems to bother me more as I get older.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 15 months ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hi Motherbynature, and thanks so much for reading and the comments. You do know you can find where your ancestors--and some present day relatives--by having your DNA tested. The results will not only pinpoint where your ancestors came from, but also where your living relatives may reside now. It once was fairly expensive for such a test but now it's very reasonable to get such information.

You may or may not enjoy another of my semi- historical hubs about the last slave ship to land in the Americas.

https://letterpile.com/creative-writing/Passage-on...

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