Goody5 profile image 83

Is it possible to predict how hard a Winter will be?


Can someone predict what a Winter will be like based on a wooly worm's color, or the size of acorns. It's been said that a black wooly worm means a hard Winter, and a brown wooly worm means that there will be a mild Winter, while the bigger the acorn is then the harder the winter will be.

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KangaYankeeDoo profile image78

Best Answer KangaYankeeDoo says

4 years ago
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rjbatty profile image80

rjbatty says

4 years ago
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  • tsadjatko profile image

    TSAD (tsadjatko) 4 years ago

    "Climatologists?" Which ones, the liars at East Anglia? Or have you forgotten about "climategate".

rfmoran profile image91

Russ Moran (rfmoran) says

4 years ago
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ElleBee says

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    Dianna Mendez (teaches12345) 4 years ago

    I would think that the animals could give us an indicator of the weather. They can sense from natural instinct the change in weather. The wooly worm was used in the midest as an indicator. You never know!

Doc Snow profile image96

Doc Snow says

4 years ago
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conradofontanilla says

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m0rd0r profile image85

Stoill Barzakov (m0rd0r) says

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tsadjatko profile image79

TSAD (tsadjatko) says

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alancaster149 profile image86

Alan Robert Lancaster (alancaster149) says

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    Alan Robert Lancaster (alancaster149) 4 years ago

    We also had a weather man (Met Office employed) called Michael Fish, who confidently told a woman on the phone 'We don't have hurricanes in Britain' hours before one struck from the South West and ripped across southern England in the mid-80's!


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j w adams says

4 years ago
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  • alancaster149 profile image

    Alan Robert Lancaster (alancaster149) 4 years ago

    Many berries - notably brambles - in the South East were spoilt, never properly grown due to lack of sunshine and excess rain during what passed for summer around London and Essex (no doubt elsewhere in the region). It might be 'where's the birdie?'


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safiq ali patel profile image71

safiq ali patel says

4 years ago
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working