Cassowary - The Dinosaur Bird

The Cassowary
The Cassowary

Do dinosaurs still exist?

In the UK there is a television series called 'Inside Nature's Giants'. It's a documentary show that dissects large beasts of the world to find out how they work, how they have evolved and so on. This programme is not for the faint hearted and can get a little gory at times, however it is in it's third series and has obviously caught peoples fascination.
On this show they have dissected animals such as elephants, tigers, lions, giraffes, pythons and even a whale! I have watched pretty much every single episode since it started, just because they are so interesting and you find out things you didn't know. However on 6th September 2011 there was an episode which I caught by chance, since I had no idea it was on.
This episode glued my eyes to the TV. They were dissecting the cassowary, also known as the dinosaur bird. This is an Australian flightless bird which they discovered to be the closest living thing to a non-avian terapod dinosaur, although on a much smaller scale everything was so similar such as the legs, feet and respiratory system all of which were directly compared allosauroid Australovenator. While dinosaurs are "proverbially extinct" the trust is they "flourish today" as birds. It was amazing to hear that in context on a popular science programme. They also went on to talk about the evolution of feathers and the reasons behind the cassowary's flightlessness.

If you haven't seen this episode you can watch it on 4oD or on youtube. It really is worth watching, so make yourself a brew, sit back and be prepared to be amazed!

More by this Author


Comments 1 comment

anonymous 3 years ago

Cassowaries are indeed like Dinosaurs. They are also large birds and they are aggressive and dangerous. They have lethal claws on their legs. The kick from these animals can rip open a person's belly. They have injured and killed people in the wild and in captivity. People should be advised to stay away from these animals.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working