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Beyond the five senses

  1. janesix profile image60
    janesixposted 2 years ago

    We have five senses.

    Smell and taste detect chemical properties

    Vision detects light waves of a certain spectrum

    Hearing detects mechanical vibration

    Feeling detects differences in heat and pressure

    But what about other things? Do we have more than five senses? How do we explain the feelings of pain and pleasure? Pleasure is more than just, say, a relief from pressure, or any other describable physical sensation. You can't describe an exact sensation. You can't quantify it. You have to have experience of it in order to know what it feels like.

    1. wilderness profile image95
      wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Pain is, of course, the response of nerves to specific temperature, pressure, chemical or other sensations caused primarily by outside sources.  It is possible for the body to cause itself pain as well, but when it does it is still forces/chemicals being detected by nerves.

      Pleasure, on the other hand, is a chemical being introduced into the brain tissues, where nerves interpret it as pleasure.  It is not, in the ordinary sense of the word, another sense as it cannot sense the environment at all.  Just internal chemical changes.

      1. janesix profile image60
        janesixposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        Great answer. You seem to be a very intelligent man. I wish I could process information as easily and as quickly as you do.

  2. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
    Kathryn L Hillposted 2 years ago

    There is the sixth sense of intuition. Intuition is necessary for survival. Those folks (animals use this sense, as well...) who do not use this sense have diminished potential for survival. Sense of proximity is based on what? if not intuition? And every one knows they have this sense.
    Of course, there are those who bump into poles all the time when looking down as they walk along. Unless, they never look down as they walk along.

    1. janesix profile image60
      janesixposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      I agree. But I wonder, what exactly it is that is detected? And by what organ or part of the body?

    2. wilderness profile image95
      wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Senses typically refer to sensing environmental stimuli, which intuition does not do.

      And can you point to the organ/cellular structure where this sense resides?  To the nerves transferring the information to the brain? 

      I think your sixth sense is more properly termed "thought" and/or "memory".  Not a sixth sense at all.

 
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