jump to last post 1-3 of 3 discussions (23 posts)

Earth

  1. poleflux profile image80
    polefluxposted 20 months ago

    If planet Earth began as a water planet with a salt core and the Earth (land, rock...) is actually extraterrestrial, wouldn't that explain many of the problems on the formation of planet Earth?  Having another planet ( Mercury) be the impactor planet 3.8 billion years ago also gives us our moon along with many other questions about Earths history.  The great unconformity, the salt in the seas, where the water came from, why the moon appears to only come from one planet rather than the collision between two rocky worlds.  The lost billion years is still on planet Mercury.

    The Earth formation should have another look rather than the majority accepted flawed science.

    1. Castlepaloma profile image25
      Castlepalomaposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      There is no other life forms found on other planets. How is the earth flawed and what other age time table would you suggest?

      1. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
        Kathryn L Hillposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        - how did she pick Mercury? Planet x?
        http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=ord … ajaxhist=0
        But anyway I like the bigger picture.

        1. Castlepaloma profile image25
          Castlepalomaposted 20 months ago in reply to this

          For it's extremely hot with weird sunsets.

          .

          1. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
            Kathryn L Hillposted 20 months ago in reply to this

            Now we 'll have to get to Mercury... or have we already?
            or its too hot?

            "Because it has almost no atmosphere to retain heat, Mercury's surface experiences the greatest temperature variation of the planets in the Solar System, ranging from 100 K (−173 °C; −280 °F) at night to 700 K (427 °C; 800 °F) during the day at some equatorial regions. The poles are constantly below 180 K (−93 °C; −136 °F)."

            "Two spacecraft have visited Mercury: Mariner 10 flew by in the 1970s; and MESSENGER, launched in 2004, orbited Mercury over 4,000 times in four years, before exhausting its fuel and crashing into the planet's surface on *April 30, 2015. * " yikes!

            Mercury's density is the second highest in the Solar System at 5.427 g/cm3, only slightly less than Earth's density of 5.515 g/cm3. If the effect of gravitational compression were to be factored out, the materials of which Mercury is made would be denser, with an uncompressed density of 5.3 g/cm3 versus Earth's 4.4 g/cm3.
            "Mercury's density can be used to infer details of its inner structure. Although Earth's high density results appreciably from gravitational compression, particularly at the core, Mercury is much smaller and its inner regions are not as compressed. Therefore, for it to have such a high density, its core must be large and rich in iron."  Wikipedia

            1. Castlepaloma profile image25
              Castlepalomaposted 20 months ago in reply to this

              Temperture is a big factor, when it get over 400c tools or spacecrafts have a hard time. Same with drilling 6 km below the surface of the earth.

              The NASA probe MESSENGER was placed in orbit around Mercury in March, 2011.

              1. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
                Kathryn L Hillposted 20 months ago in reply to this

                oh... I wondered about that.

              2. poleflux profile image80
                polefluxposted 20 months ago in reply to this

                I believe that Mercury gave Earth, well, the earth!  The land beneath your feet is extraterrestrial.

            2. poleflux profile image80
              polefluxposted 20 months ago in reply to this

              Curiously, Mercury's molten iron core is surrounded by liquid iron sulfide.  Not to mention it has the largest quantity of sulfur on its surface, necessary for life.

          2. poleflux profile image80
            polefluxposted 20 months ago in reply to this

            just for a fun oddity, maybe the impactor planet that created the moon, referred to as planet Theia was really planet Thera, and when you scramble those letters up you get Earth!

        2. poleflux profile image80
          polefluxposted 20 months ago in reply to this

          I chose Mercury because it is missing most of its crust, it has a magnetic field oriented the same North, South, polarity, Mercury was not formed in its current location, first rock from the sun, there is water ice on Mercury, it was formed roughly 4 billion years ago, so was earth, and the moon, and the asteroid belt, it just fits if Earth was formed as a water, ice planet with a salt core, much like Europa,
          thanks for reading:)

      2. poleflux profile image80
        polefluxposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        I think the 4 billion year time table is sufficient for making Mercury the seed to Earths pond.

    2. janesix profile image60
      janesixposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      A salt core? That's a new one.

      1. poleflux profile image80
        polefluxposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        planet gleisi 581c as well as the moon Europa is evidence of a water planet with a salt core, they do exist, I believe this is how earth formed, not rocky iron planet as formerly suggested

      2. poleflux profile image80
        polefluxposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        when water is compressed enough it changes into salt (halite) it is called ice Vll (7)

        1. poleflux profile image80
          polefluxposted 20 months ago in reply to this

          at great depths, such as a water planet, creating the core in the center

  2. Gwyn Buchanan profile image78
    Gwyn Buchananposted 20 months ago

    I have a couple of issues with this theory:

    1)If Mercury had impacted with Earth then Mercury would no longer exist. Mercury is also pretty far away from earth, what with Venus's orbit in between them.
    2)We know that the solar system operates within certain rules of physics (so far from what we have observed). When the solar system formed the planets formed out of an accretion disk of rock, plasma, liquid and gas. That conformed to a broadly stable planar system. All the planets that originally formed in our solar system (not pluto) orbit on the same plane and their orbits do not cross each other as a function of the formation process. On average: heavy elements closer to the sun, gas giants further out.
    3) The impact theory is used to explain the existence of our moon which is a significant derivation from the norm in that it is much bigger than it should be relative to earth's size when compared to the other planets. Possibly the best way to learn more about the impact will be to study isotopic evidence and the structure of the moon as well as the asteroid belt between Earth and Mars as that is thought to be left over debris from the impact.
    4) As I understand it, it is currently thought that an asteroid the size of Mars is thought to be the body that impacted with Earth some 4.5 billion years ago.
    5) I'm not really sure what you mean about salts. Salts are chemical compounds just like minerals and exist in rocks, when compounds and crystal lattices dissolve in water anions and cations enter the water system and can precipitate out for a number of different reasons, usually temperature related and oxygen enrichment related...

    I agree that there are very much more questions than answers where it comes to the great impact theory but it is still the most likely with the evidence at hand.

    1. poleflux profile image80
      polefluxposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      to solve this problem, the Earth, before there was earth, was a giant planet with a salt core, Mercury, the rock, crashed into the proto-Earth, 4 times the size today, you could allow for this anomaly and explain Mercury's sodium tail.

      1. poleflux profile image80
        polefluxposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        A water planet Earth, very important, the water has always existed before the land

    2. poleflux profile image80
      polefluxposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      I also believe that Jupiters great red spot is from the anti-impact with Mercury, knocking it out of orbit and into ours, leaving us the moon and the asteroid belt, and perhaps the scar on mars.  I also believe that Mercury's magnetic field reverses when the Earth's magnetic field reverses by way of magnetic reconnection

    3. poleflux profile image80
      polefluxposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      Mercury has 42 percent oxygen in its crust, compared to Earths 47 percent in its crust

  3. janesix profile image60
    janesixposted 20 months ago

    poleflux, your ideas are interesting and I'd like to see you write more hubs and participate more in the forums. We need fresh ideas here.

    1. poleflux profile image80
      polefluxposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      Thank you Jane!  That is sweet of you to say.  I will participate more and am currently working on new hubs.  I appreciate your encouragement:)

 
working