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1998 an original article of the expanding/accelerating universe

  1. SparklingJewel profile image68
    SparklingJewelposted 8 years ago

    So this is what I was remembering having read. If we can't discuss what was considered 1998's biggest scientific breakthrough on the science forum, where does it belong?


    and just Google "accelerating universe" and you will see all the newest theory on the subject

    The religion forum is not just about religions, but spirituality, which most people consider an aside from religion. But see, this is what I'm talking about. Schools of thought are merging, and people need to just get a grip on it and themselves. There is no longer just right and left brain interaction or exclusion...we've got full frontal lobe action going on here, there is a place for understanding how we are spiritual and scientific beings having a human experience!

    Yes, ideally it would be good to have, specific forums for religion and spirituality, as well as science and metaphysics (is that the best term to use?)

  2. knolyourself profile image60
    knolyourselfposted 8 years ago

    Wherever it belongs I don't hold with it. I remember the expanding balloon theory.
    The universe is expanding except where galaxies are colliding and except where
    black holes are sucking everything in the opposite direction into infinity. And certainly the galaxy that we reside is flying apart. Making this big bang thing work gets real complicated.

    1. 0
      ColdWarBabyposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      The universe is expanding EVERYWHERE.  The galaxies in collision and the sucking black holes are all expanding in relationship to each other.  Not only is the expansion taking place, it’s still accelerating.  If this continues long enough entropy will have the last say and the system will become inert.

      heat death
      The eventual dispersion of all of the energy within a physical system to a completely uniform distribution of heat energy, that is, to maximum entropy. Heat death for all macroscopic physical systems, including the universe, is predicted by the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

  3. 0
    sandra rinckposted 8 years ago

    Sparkling Jewel,

    I consider myself spiritual, whatever it means to me, is for me, as for the the accelerating galexy...I get it, but where we are actually in the gallexy is not concrete because if it is going further and further and such, it would depend on where our galexy is.  For instance, maybe the universe isnt going anywhere but we are moving further away.  That in itself ties into the spiritual realm of things. 

    What are your thoughts?cool

    1. SparklingJewel profile image68
      SparklingJewelposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      I wish I had more thoughts on it all smile

      I don't have enough mainstream science background to start postulating about the connection between science and religion/spirituality at the moment. I do have "special moments" when I can "tune in" to those realms of higher understanding.
      I just know from years of those moments and readings of various books, that the divine is being out-pictured in this physical realm of perception. And that one has to have just the "right state of mind" to perceive and postulate the True Vision of what is being out-pictured. Everyone is unique in how they perceive even the same occurrence.
      I am actually gearing up to my "Easter time" meditation ritual week, starting tomorrow. Maybe I will come back with some really interesting perspective and change of consciousness again this year, as every year
      I will get back to you. You have been "on my heart" a lot recently. I keep you in my prayers. Be mindful (patient and at peace) and don't make any big permanent decision, allow change to occur gradually, it will become more clear.
      Love ya,

      1. 0
        sandra rinckposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        thanks Jewell,  I think about you all the time too even when I don't post many comments to you.  I do read them though, and I will take your advise.  Have a great and enlightening Easter time, meditation week. 
        Love you back!

  4. crashcromwell profile image80
    crashcromwellposted 8 years ago

    When I was a kid, I wanted to be an astronomer, that is until I discovered that in order to do that, you had to be a math whiz, which I am not. So now I content myself with watching the discovery science channel and writing science fiction fantasy novels.

    When I was in college, I had the opportunity to take an astronomy class for dummies (ie, not physics majors). I recall the subject coming up similiar to this, asking whether the universe would continue to expand indefinitely or whether it would reach an optimal point, and begin retracting, until it winds up back where it began as a singularity.

    The question that had to be answered was whether there was sufficient mass in the universe to continue forcing outward. At the time, back in the mid-eighties, the best the scientists could say was that they were not sure. There were these subatomic particles called neutrinos that were so widespread throughout the universe that if they had even an infantesimile amount of mass, their combined mass would push it over the top and science could declare that the universe was going to expand forever. The problem was, at least in 1986, they had yet to find a way to measure how much a neutrino weighed, if anything.

    My class wound up taking the position that anything that exists must have mass, so if they know these neutrinos exist, then the point was moot.

    As for the other piece of this question, that's a point I think they're still working on. It seems to defy the laws of physics that the universe is growing at a faster and faster rate, when you would expect that after the initial Big Bang, the growth should be slowing. By all accounts, it's not, but the scientists can't figure out why it's happening.

  5. bloggerdollar profile image44
    bloggerdollarposted 8 years ago

    After expanding to the limits the big bang would reverse and whole universe would collapse into a small dot.

  6. crashcromwell profile image80
    crashcromwellposted 8 years ago

    That would be the scenario that would unfold if neutrinos have no mass, because there would be insufficent mass in the universe to perpetuate into perpetuity. Of course, this is all an academic exercise. None of us will be around if and when that scenario unfolds.

    Jim Henry