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String Theory's Ability to Agree With General Relativity?

  1. Mentalist acer profile image61
    Mentalist acerposted 6 years ago

    I'd like a laymans explanation of String Theory's application to dimensions and if it's these dimensions that make general relativity and quantum mechanics agree with one another or if it's something else???

    1. Shahid Bukhari profile image60
      Shahid Bukhariposted 6 years ago

      On Strings Theory Proposed, Hypo-Nano, Physical Scale of Form  ... Every theory, Discussing the Physical ... has to Agree, that in one, or the other ways, it is somehow, Relate-able to the Strings State, of Elemental Forms...

      Its like the Relatibility of an Atom to the Molecule, and thus, the Molecule being considered Relative to the Elephant.

    2. Shahid Bukhari profile image60
      Shahid Bukhariposted 6 years ago

      On the Strings Hypo-Nano, Physical Scale of Form, propounded by the Theory ... Every theory, Discussing the Physical ... has to Agree, that in one, or the other ways, it is somehow, Relate-able to the Strings State of Elemental Forms...

      Its like the Relatibility of an Atom to the Molecule, and thus, of the Molecule, to the Elephant.

    3. Ben Evans profile image74
      Ben Evansposted 6 years ago

      String theory has not linked quantum mechanics to general relativity yet.  It may never.

      The basic string theory is saying that atomic particles are not point objects but they are analogous to strings vibrating.

      We imagine string theory as this one theory that has revolutionized physics.  It is not one but it is many theories (by different scientists) and the mathematics is so complex that many scientists are just picking and choosing solutions that are close to what their hypothesis states.  There are 11 dimensions of vibration. 

      Take a look at greens function and look at wave equations in single dimensions. Look it up on the web.  This is a solving basic wave equations.  That is pretty nasty mathematics.  Now imagine many more dimensions...............

      String theory is imagined to quantify space by many but its main purpose is to explain GUFT (Grand Unified Field Theory) or to explain it in non field terms.

      What is not currently explained by relativity or any other theory is this:

      Lets just imagine an atom........It has electrons and protons which have negative and positive charges respectively.  If you have had chemistry you know that atoms form bonds such as ionic bonds by the positive and negative attraction (abundance or lack of electrons in a shell) of the aforementioned particles.  So here are the qestions......Why dont the eletrons spin into the proton in an atomic model?  What holds particles that make atoms together and how are 2 protons held together when they want to repel?  How does gravity work?  There are more questions.

      I know this is an over simplification.  In layman's terms string theory is trying to link together relativity and these basic quantum forces.

      There are many people who will try to say they are experts on this and I will tell you right now I am not.  I have had a lot of math and physics but I still can only scratch the surface.  There are many people with a PHD that could not explain this and there are different string theories.

      String Theory can only be broken down to a basic shell of the theory because to know any more a person is going to have to have a very advanced understanding of mathematics and physics.

    4. Mentalist acer profile image61
      Mentalist acerposted 6 years ago

      String theory is an attempt to deal with the fact that the two major theories in physics, quantum mechanics and relativity, are fundamentally incompatible. It manages to merge the two by positing a set of extra dimensions beyond the usual four. We don't see these because they're tightly wrapped within a tiny radius that is inapproachable at normal energies.

      In one form of string theory—the paper calls it the ADD model because Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali proposed it—this unification has consequences for gravity. Normally, gravity is very weak relative to the other forces, such that it could only become unified with the rest of them at energies many orders of magnitude higher than the LHC could reach. But, in the ADD model, gravity only looks weak because portions of it are caught up in the remaining dimensions. This drops the energies down to something right in the heart of the LHC's capabilities.

     
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