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Is College Really Optional?

  1. AshleyRB profile image60
    AshleyRBposted 6 years ago

    Most people I know who are in college don't really feel like there are any other options besides going to school. Does anybody feel like there are legit options besides getting a degree?

    I mean besides singing/rapping/stripping/drug dealing/etc. because those don't appeal to most people or me for that matter.

  2. habee profile image90
    habeeposted 6 years ago

    Some tech-school grads are making more money than college graduates. They often find jobs more quickly, too. In GA, you can attend tech school for free. Is it that way in all states? I think our lottery pays for it.

    1. AshleyRB profile image60
      AshleyRBposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Definitely not! It's not like that in Texas. And I agree with you! My father is an X Ray Tech and he makes good money, but I know people with Bachelor degrees who can't even get a job!

      It's crazy...I wonder if it's even worth it to pursue my personal interest, which is psychology. I know when I graduate I won't make much money. I went to a job interview at a restaurant and the person who interviewed me had a degree in philosophy. It was a little bit of a wake up call for me.

      Some people say "do what you love," but seriously we have to be smart financially right?

      1. habee profile image90
        habeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Right, Ashley. I know a guy with a Master's in Archeology, and he's delivering pizza. I was lucky. I always wanted to be a teacher, and I quickly found a job right out of college.

      2. ediggity profile image60
        ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I guess that's where you have to bridge the gap between studying what you want to learn and love vs. learning what pays.  Some people are fortunate to have both.  Growing up stinks sometimes.

  3. wilderness profile image96
    wildernessposted 6 years ago

    I'm an electrician.  While it does require schooling (4 years of night school) it does not require a degree.

    Interestingly, most of my co-workers that have reached the journeyman level also have contractors licenses and do work on the side.  Several have left to start their own company and some have done well at it.

    It would hard to conceive of anyone starting a small electrical business without hands on experience in the field and actually making a go of it.

    Although I have a BS degree (and feel that is is valuable) I also recognize that it is not necessary to becoming financially successful.

    1. AshleyRB profile image60
      AshleyRBposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      wilderness, what was your plan for getting the BS degree?

  4. lrohner profile image84
    lrohnerposted 6 years ago

    A lot of young kids don't feel they need any more education beyond high school. But any type of secondary education, whether a college or a tech school, gives you a Plan B in case Plan A doesn't pan out.

    1. habee profile image90
      habeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      A "plan B" is always a good idea!

  5. Gordon G. profile image59
    Gordon G.posted 6 years ago

    I really think it has a lot to do with where you want to be in life. You can definitely try alternatives and be financially sound. But maybe some of your goals require a college degree. (Even grad school) Ex:Psychologist, Psychiatrist
    But I definitely don't think that everyone has to go to college to do well or even excel in life. It just takes more effort.

  6. 2uesday profile image86
    2uesdayposted 6 years ago

    In the UK sometimes there are still jobs that you can work four days a week and go to college one day a week to study for a qualification; your employer usually pays the college fees.

  7. profile image0
    Sophia Angeliqueposted 6 years ago

    Depends how well one was educated one was by the time one left school, or how many profitable skills one had.

    I made very sure that my daughter started learning skills to support herself at age 13 so that she could always work for herself by having skills that others would want.

    I now see the fruit of this.

    Unfortunately, a lot of what parenting is about has been lost. It is, I think, the responsibility of the parent to ensure that kids develop market place skills as soon as possible.

    College is no guarantee of a job as it depends on the kind of degree. I know more than a few who have very good degrees and who have been unemployed for going on two years now.

    1. Jeff Berndt profile image91
      Jeff Berndtposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      "College is no guarantee of a job as it depends on the kind of degree."
      That's the truth!

      Singer-songwriter Wally Pleasant has a tune called "The Overeducated Out-of-Work Blues." So very apt.

      And it's a bummer that there's this huge emphasis on college to the point of disparaging the skilled trades. As Wilderness pointed out, it doesn't take a degree to become an electrician, but electricianing is not exactly simple work. It's hard, and if you do it wrong, really dangerous. But tell you what: no job that requires a Master Electrician (or even a Journeyman Electrician) is going to get outsourced.

      There's a book out called "Shop Class as Soulcraft: an Inquiry into the Value of Work." I recommend it to anyone who is looking to change careers, or pick one to begin with.

      1. profile image0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Jeff, my irritation with so many - and it is that - are the numbers of 'college educated' who will jump to the defense their so-called 'education'. Just the fact that they miss what is being said here, indicates how dismally their college degree education failed them.

        The fallacy that they are 'educated' and that this somehow makes them special is so deeply entrenched, it's difficult to even suggest that they might not have received an 'education'. It's the same sort of mind set that had so many buying homes when it was the worst possible thing they could do. Reality, of course, is now coming home to roost for so many as banks foreclose or they face negative equity.

        I have an idea that those who are so ardently defending their 'education' even if they can't find jobs with it, will one day realize that they've been had.

        1. Rafini profile image86
          Rafiniposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I have an idea that those who are so ardently defending their 'education' even if they can't find jobs with it, will one day realize that they've been had.

          I think that's a sad way to look at a college education, but I also think you're right when it comes down to many.

          1. profile image0
            Sophia Angeliqueposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Rafini, I'm not throwing out the baby with the bath water. I have the highest regard for people that are well educated. However, sadly, most of the time, this is not the college graduate of today. Yes, some are, but most aren't. Many don't realize that they have been fed nothing but propaganda.

            Of course, if one has spent a bucket load of money that was going to take two decades to pay off, and one can't find a job with it, it's really hard to deal with. It's even more difficult to say, "I've been had." Nobody likes to think that someone sold them a pig in the poke.

            However, the way out of this is to become angry enough to stop it from happening to others!

            1. Rafini profile image86
              Rafiniposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              (I agree with you!)


              It just burns my bum that it takes a college education to get a job that doesn't pay a living wage - what's the point in paying for college if you wont earn enough to live on afterward?  I'm so glad I've finally decided to take the risks and live with the outcome - the immediate & long term. hmm smile

              1. Misha profile image76
                Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                May be moving somewhere where life is cheaper and you can support you with the skills you already have would be a better decision than throwing a heap of money on something that almost certainly does not provide a solution?

                Happy New Year! smile

                1. Rafini profile image86
                  Rafiniposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Hiya Misha!  How are you?


                  I'm going to school cuz I'm unemployed and am using Grants only - totally Free education!  lol  (my post was speaking in general, for people who have to take out loans or pay out of pocket)

                  I've considered moving, after my son graduates high school.  Then I'll be free to move anywhere in the world. big_smile

                  1. profile image0
                    Sophia Angeliqueposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Rafini, many of us are looking for places where we can earn a living and afford to live! smile

                    For some it's easier than others. There's language to consider. Also, it's not that easy to just move from country to country. Most countries have strict criteria for whom they let in, and there's a cut off age at about 35. Also, they tend to give preference to those that have the skills they need and look for, so if you train in a skill that is highly desired elsewhere than that would be good.

                    Don't laugh. About the best skill wanted world wise is nursing! smile

                  2. Misha profile image76
                    Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    I am fine, thank you - and hope you are doing great, too smile

                    LOL If it's a freebie, it certainly changes the situation quite a bit. Have fun! smile

  8. anniedee profile image81
    anniedeeposted 6 years ago

    It just depends on what a person wants to do with his or her life. I used to think college was unnecessary (for me), but recently I've decided I want to learn some new skills. I still haven't decided if I'll go to school or self-educate. I've lucked out so far without having a degree, not sure if I want to press my luck further.

  9. Misha profile image76
    Mishaposted 6 years ago

    It certainly is. As others said already, it mostly depends on what you want to do in life. smile

  10. Rafini profile image86
    Rafiniposted 6 years ago

    College is optional, if you don't mind struggling through life without ever having enough and knowing you never will.  Or, if your lucky enough to have rich parents who will support you while telling the world you are busy learning life skills.  Or, unless you are talented and ambitious enough to go to Hollywood, or wherever you need to go, to succeed and follow your dreams.

    After 25 years of struggling, most of the time at or just above minimum wage, I've decided I don't enjoy struggling.  I will go to college, and get a degree, because that's what I want. 

    Unfortunately, I understand at this point a degree wont help much in the income department.  Where I live, it takes a Bachelors degree to earn $30,000/yr yet the cost of living requires $35,000/yr.  hmm  Maybe after graduation I'll move somewhere with a lower cost of living...smile

    1. AshleyRB profile image60
      AshleyRBposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You can move to Texas! smile
      The air is clean and everything is spread out.
      Cypress is a beautiful place!
      It is very cheap to live there.

  11. Jane@CM profile image60
    Jane@CMposted 6 years ago

    For me hindsight is 20/20.  I wish I had gone to college or tech (trade school) and finished.  Right now I wouldn't be able to find a job, I would need to take classes to update my computer skills and software skills to get back to where I was 20 years ago when I stopped working outside of the home.  I can still take online classes or local CC classes to update those skills. 

    I guess its an individual decision.

 
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