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how can i improve my spoken english?

  1. sumitparihar profile image61
    sumitpariharposted 5 years ago

    can anybody tell me some tips so that i can improve my spoken english?

    1. uncorrectedvision profile image60
      uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Be patient with yourself.  I am guessing from your profile name that you are originally from the sub-continent.  I have friends from all over Asia and it takes practice, practice, practice.

      1. sumitparihar profile image61
        sumitpariharposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        yes i need a lot of pratice..

    2. britneydavidson profile image60
      britneydavidsonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      watch BBC News and buy some good spoken english book and talk with yourself by looking on mirror.

      1. sumitparihar profile image61
        sumitpariharposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Talking to myself .....great

        1. britneydavidson profile image60
          britneydavidsonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          yes talk with urself in mirror that will help you in buidling confident on yourself  and your body language also.

          1. 61
            ShortStoryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I don't think that's such a hot idea. Substitute a native English speaker for the mirror.

    3. May PL profile image89
      May PLposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Socialise with English speaking friends, practise as often as possible.

    4. Shahid Bukhari profile image60
      Shahid Bukhariposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      The first and last lesson, of achieving excellence of Speech, to me, is ... the development of the ability to describe your "feelings" ...

      Once, you can say, exactly, what you Feel about a thing, or a person ... meaning, you are able to Communicate your Feelings ... to the other, as  intended ... you are a master of Speech.

      Practice is the Key, to powerful Speech ... be bold, we all make mistakes, and there are hiccups in the beginning, but continue relentlessly ... practicing, speech, till you have achieved mastery.

    5. 0
      David99999posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      First of all...be patient.  From the personal experience of having learned a second language fluently, I can tell you that a human being's comprehension of a new tongue tends to precede his/her ability to speak it.  The most effective way that I have found, in regard to improving pronunciation, in to socialize, as often as possible, with people for whom the language is their mother tongue. 

      As a teacher, I can tell you that human learning is mainly a result of rehearsal. We retain knowledge in the subconscious mind.  After listening to, and imitating words and phrases a multitude of times, we become proficient.

      Remember, too, that everyone is different.  Each of us has subjects which come more easily to us than others. For some, it is sports, for others, it may be physical science.  Even if someone you know may seem to have an easier time with English as a second language, that person may, simply, happen to have been born with a talent for learning languages.

      Be patient.   Expose yourself, as often as possible, to native speakers of English.  Rehearse speaking daily.

  2. IzzyM profile image86
    IzzyMposted 5 years ago

    Watch DVD movies in English. You'll probably end up with an American accent but it doesn't really matter, so long as you are otherwise healthy smile

    1. sumitparihar profile image61
      sumitpariharposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      yes,I'll do this Thanks for this..

  3. IzzyM profile image86
    IzzyMposted 5 years ago

    Another thing that will help is to listen to any English radio or television channels you have access to. Surround yourself with the sound and soon it will become almost normal to you.

    I live in Spain and am still learning to speak Spanish, but my first and main language is English.

  4. Jule Romans profile image88
    Jule Romansposted 5 years ago

    Watch classic American movies!

  5. SiddSingh profile image60
    SiddSinghposted 5 years ago

    Read a lot - newspapers, magazines, novels and books. And yes, watch English movies.

    1. sumitparihar profile image61
      sumitpariharposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks for reply...

  6. recommend1 profile image72
    recommend1posted 5 years ago

    get VOA news online - it gives you the spoken news with the text scrolling beneath it in time.  It is an excellent tool to link speaking and what you already know in your writing.  I advise using the same one many times (40 - 50) over a few days, until you begin to sound like the reader and have become familiar with the words and meanings so they are no longer a part of your concentration. Then move to a new one and 'do' that the same - and then go back and do the first one again a few times . . . and so on.  ..   For most people a second language is really easy - it just takes months of hard memory work smile

    1. sumitparihar profile image61
      sumitpariharposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      yes it take a hard memory work...great information..
      it will help me also..Thanks a lot

  7. thirdmillenium profile image70
    thirdmilleniumposted 5 years ago

    http://hubpages.com/hub/Never-Learn-Gra … rn-English

    Go to above hub, read carefully and follow it. DO NOT read newspapers, listen to news watch English movies. These will only succeed in putting you off the right path.
    DO NOT learn grammar, never

    1. 61
      ShortStoryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      DO NOT follow the 'advice' in the above post. It is categorical and misleading.

      1. thirdmillenium profile image70
        thirdmilleniumposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I have been teaching English language for 35 years and in my second year as teacher I realized it is grammar which is the stumbling block.
        I had taught some 50,000 people and many of them  had always come back to me from places where English is the Lingua Franca and thanked me for my method of teaching

        Thank you

        1. superwags profile image81
          superwagsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          * Lingua franca

          1. thirdmillenium profile image70
            thirdmilleniumposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Ha, yes thank you, I stand corrected

        2. 61
          ShortStoryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I have only 17 years of experience and a Master's Degree in Linguistics with a concentration in language acquisition.

          Your oversimplification is inaccurately categorical and misleading. You are confusing first and second language acquisition, the role of prior learning experiences, adult vs child, affective considerations, and are over-representing the role of syntax while avoiding many, many other important parts of language and its acquisition.

          Gonna go out on a limb here and assume you were never very good at grammar yourself and found it too complex and intimidating for you as a young teacher. You responded to this insecurity by fabricating a means of justifying your avoidance of an important aspect of language and its acquisition.

          I have no doubt that many of your students have done very well. Learning is like going on a diet. If you stick with almost any program you will lose weight because it's more than you were doing before. Humans are inclinded to learn like fish are inclined to swim. Any food is the 'perfect' food for a starving man. - insert another painful analogy here - I also have no doubt that most if not all of your students went on to study grammar in some fashion after leaving your care (as surely most did before) and made up in some degree for what you were incapable of providing them. The starving man will live if you just give him bread and water (and be rightly grateful for it) but he will eventually go have a steak and a salad somewhere else if you cannot provide that for him, though he will remain grateful for that bread and water when he had nothing else.

          That having been said, I believe your heart is in the right place even if it is too timid.

          1. sumitparihar profile image61
            sumitpariharposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            yes I agree grammer is also very important in learning any language.
            I would be greatul if you have any idea so that I can improve my english.

            1. 61
              ShortStoryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              The more (and various) opportunities you can find to interact with native speakers, the better. Are you taking formal classes somewhere?

              1. sumitparihar profile image61
                sumitpariharposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                no,I am not taking formal classes.

          2. thirdmillenium profile image70
            thirdmilleniumposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I must thank you for conceding my heart is in the right place.

            I have an "A" certificate from English and Foreign Languages University in Hyderabad, India. It conducts its examinations with some of the toughest grammar questions.

            It does not easily award its certificates. Its examinations are overseen by British Council and evaluated  by Orient Longman.

            I have postulated the practical aspect of learning English and how grammar automatically is learned the natural way even without your having to know what a verb or an adjective is.

            My students have been praised in interviews in the UK and other English speaking countries for the natural flow rather than the contrived way Indians tend to speak in.

            Many of my students are writers in reputed journals and they acknowledge that it was my method of teaching that took them far into the realm of intricate and nuanced language practice.

            Thank you

            1. 61
              ShortStoryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I applaud your accomplishments, but see nothing in that post that contradicts the points raised in my previous post.

        3. recommend1 profile image72
          recommend1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          This may be partly true in some places - but here in China every kid learns English through grammar as the required second language. 

          This means that abandoning grammar in teaching English is a bad idea, as most students of any age cannot cope with their learning base unsettled with  such a major change.

          I do however agree with the basic idea of reducing grammar to a supporting role the higher the learner progresses, normally in balance with the increased meaning in the speaking.

          As ShortStory says - it is not a good idea to oversimplify with such statements.  Different types of learner, different languages, even, require different approaches.

          1. 61
            ShortStoryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            There ya go. Good points.

            1. recommend1 profile image72
              recommend1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              You have an email smile

  8. Karanda profile image85
    Karandaposted 5 years ago

    Listen to as much spoken English as you possibly can and try and speak as much English as you can. Anyone you know that speaks English should be able to help with this.

    1. recommend1 profile image72
      recommend1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      This is correct - also do not ignore the other people around you who are learners, a group of learners speaking English to each other can have additional benefits to speaking to that gained from talking to expert' speakers.   Practice of simple words and phrases that are the basis of most conversation helps to make them automatic, then adding new words etc is easier.

      1. 61
        ShortStoryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        You want to be careful with that one. Practice is always good, and mutual support can be motivating, but if too much essential input comes from other non-native speakers, particularly if they speak the same first language, errors and inaccuracies can be mutually reinforced. It is difficult to 'fix' such things once they become ingrained.

  9. DIYweddingplanner profile image91
    DIYweddingplannerposted 5 years ago

    I have a friend who has English as her second language, but speaks beautiful English.  She told me she learned from watching American soap operas!

  10. aheil profile image60
    aheilposted 5 years ago

    you need to practice it. really that's the only way. practice makes perfect.

  11. Aficionada profile image93
    Aficionadaposted 5 years ago

    I would so love to jump into the middle of this argument!! ... but I'm not gonna do so. smile

    OP-sumitparihar, do you by any chance have a webcam, or can you get/use one?  It could give you access to conversation practice with native English speakers, even if you can't find any easily accessible ones (n.Engl.sps.) close to where you live.  Just be careful about the conversation partners you choose (for numerous reasons).

    1. sumitparihar profile image61
      sumitpariharposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      What kind of reasons may be ...yes I can join.

      1. Aficionada profile image93
        Aficionadaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        You mean the reasons why I recommend being careful about the people you choose as conversation partners?

        Sadly, tragically, there are many people on the internet who are unethical and deceitful, some who are predators, some who urge others to horrible actions.  That is the first reason for being careful, and I don't think that it can be stressed enough.

        In terms of practicing English, it would be good to be careful because there are many people who speak English as their first language but who have sloppy language skills.  As a learner, you might possibly be confused about what is considered to be acceptable and what is not.  I don't mean by that that you should totally avoid people who speak everyday English or even "bad" English.  But you wouldn't want that conversation to be your only or primary source of practice.

        1. sumitparihar profile image61
          sumitpariharposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          These are really good points,Thanks for giving me this correction...

  12. brakel2 profile image87
    brakel2posted 5 years ago via iphone

    Join an English speaking Toastmasters Club

  13. Purple Perl profile image80
    Purple Perlposted 5 years ago

    sumitparihar,
    You seem to have a fair knowledge of English. I suggest you read all the posts here aloud,also the hubs you read. And as already suggested,read aloud in front of a mirror. You will know the use of the language and each word and then you can listen to English news on TV, and watch movies. Soon, you can be fluent and be able to speak English fluently.Begin with friends who know the language.

    1. 61
      ShortStoryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I do NOT recommend talking to yourself in front of a mirror or reading aloud.

      If you talk to yourself in front of a mirror your eyes will naturally focus on your mouth and you may end up concretizing pronunciation patterns that you don't want. Go talk to a native speaker instead. Even watching TV or movies woud be preferable to looking at yourself in a mirror in this regard.

      Reading aloud is not recommended because as an adult (teaching adults a second or foreign language as if they were children is a mistake) the process of reading is an internal one. Reading is actually a very complex (and not entirely natural) process and 'confusing' the brain by adding context that is outside the normal use pattern will only hinder progress in that area. One develops an 'internal voice' when reading, and this is where techniques and approaches can be applied to support the development of the skill in its appropriate context, but this is too involved to get into here. Finding a qualified reading instructor would be best for that particular language skill.

      1. recommend1 profile image72
        recommend1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Talking to yourself in front of the mirror is a good idea when changing 'habitual' sounds - the ability to see the tongue and mouth working is an exceptionally good way to get control of those semi-automatic functions.  I teach this especially for Chinese students who have trouble with V W and TH - it is the most succesful method for permanently correcting the pronunciation of these sounds that I have encountered so far.

        I would agree that holding a conversation with yourself in front of amirror is not such a good idea for everyone, some people might benefit however, and if there really is nobody else it may be better than nothing.

        1. 61
          ShortStoryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Watching the mouth of someone who is mispronouncing the sound (namely, the subject) is only a good way to reinforce the inaccuracy. Watching the mouth of a native speaker provides accurate input and takes advantage (to a degree) of natural tendencies in language acquisition. One of the best ways for a learner of a foreign language to address problems in pronuciation is for a native-speaking instructor to really exaggerrate the sound in question - to what will seem like a ridiculous degree. When the example of the native speaker goes waaaay over the top, the aim of the non-native speaker will fall somewhere near to the mark.

          1. SiddSingh profile image60
            SiddSinghposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Australians speak English in a widely different manner than English, and Americans have an altogether different way of speaking. Even in US, people from different regions may have different accents (so I gather from movies, TV etc - I have met very few real US residents). Yet, they are all "native" English speakers. So, which example should a non native English speaker follow?

            1. 61
              ShortStoryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Any example will do (although if you want to be understood anywhere outside of Australia...)

          2. recommend1 profile image72
            recommend1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I don't agree with this at all.  A language sound is what it is, when the mouth shape makes the pronunciation of a sound correctly that is more than enough - no need for demeaning over-emphasising.

            And practicing in front of hte mirror is to see the mouth controlling its shape to make the right sound, nothing to do with the kind of constant practicing that reinforces incorrect pronunciation.

            1. 61
              ShortStoryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              That would make sense if pronunciation involved nothing more than the shape of the mouth, but it actually involves much more. Look, I'm not just making this stuff up off the top of my head. What I'm telling your is based on studies and on years of experience. Doing the occasional exercise with a mirror - in the proper context - can have its uses, but in isolation or too frequently it carries the risks mentioned above. Exaggeration is not demeaning, it is in fact a natural communicative strategy that people fall into almost unconsiously when striving for intelligibility (think of someone talking to a stranger who is having trouble understanding, or a mother teaching her child) and has been proven to be beneficial in guiding non-native speakers closer to the mark. Of course, that's not the end all and be all in itself either. Pronunciation is more than just single sounds (and certainly more than just the shape of one's mouth). There are more complicated issues inovlving suprasegmentals, context, age, etc. that play key roles as well.

  14. 61
    fghederiposted 5 years ago

    believe in yourself and be confident. Don't be anxious about making mistakes. Do have a go , don't avoid talking thinking you are not ready for that. It comes by practice

 
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