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Which is the largest star that is visible from earth??

  1. Sneha Sunny profile image84
    Sneha Sunnyposted 6 years ago

    Not the cluster of stars but the star.

    1. Shahid Bukhari profile image61
      Shahid Bukhariposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      As far as the "Largest" Star ... visible from Earth ... Thus, in Sun's relative context ... there are Trillions ... though only few of these have been Classified ... while most, yet remain to be Classified, and Categorized.

      But you can be sure, when you look up at the skies on a clear night, there are hundreds, perhaps thousands of dim Stars ... most being by far much larger, than our sun ... adorning our Earth's Night Skies.

    2. profile image60
      ForYourInfoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      It is said that Alpha Centauri is the one.

  2. paradigmsearch profile image85
    paradigmsearchposted 6 years ago

    I’ll guess Betelgeuse.smile

    1. Sneha Sunny profile image84
      Sneha Sunnyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I searched about it and wikipedia says that it is the 8th brightest star in the night sky and 2nd brightest star in the orion constellation. smile

  3. Reality Bytes profile image94
    Reality Bytesposted 6 years ago

    I believe that would be Sirius.

    Sirius in the constellation Canis Major (the Greater Dog) is the sky’s brightest star. This star’s brightness makes it easy to find on winter and spring evening

    1. Sneha Sunny profile image84
      Sneha Sunnyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      sirius is the brightest one not the largest one. smile

    2. profile image61
      piyuschgposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Sirius is the brightest star. I think it is Betelgeuse, which is the 8th brightest star

  4. getitrite profile image80
    getitriteposted 6 years ago

    Proxima Centauri

  5. Reality Bytes profile image94
    Reality Bytesposted 6 years ago

    The correct answer would be Sirius!

  6. getitrite profile image80
    getitriteposted 6 years ago

    Actually the correct answer is the SUN.

    1. Reality Bytes profile image94
      Reality Bytesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      True, my bad.  The obvious sometimes evades me.  lol

      1. getitrite profile image80
        getitriteposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        lol lol

    2. Sneha Sunny profile image84
      Sneha Sunnyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Sun appears to be the largest as it is closer to our planet... But I am asking for the largest star that we can see from earth. Sun's size is nothing infront of many stars.... smile

  7. ahorseback profile image44
    ahorsebackposted 6 years ago

    Uhh ....ya!

  8. Rochelle Frank profile image89
    Rochelle Frankposted 6 years ago

    I was thinking the Sun at first, too, but the sun is a rather small star. It appears large because it is relatively close. There are giant stars that can be seen from earth, but some of them are millions of light years away.

    1. Reality Bytes profile image94
      Reality Bytesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      So it is possible that I did indeed have the correct answer?

    2. paradigmsearch profile image85
      paradigmsearchposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Same here and I agree. The question is which is the largest, etc; not which one appears the largest.

  9. ahorseback profile image44
    ahorsebackposted 6 years ago

    UH UH UH , you asked  "what is the biggest "visible .....technicly thats a iffy question for interpretation. Ha

  10. ahorseback profile image44
    ahorsebackposted 6 years ago

    Sorry "Largest" .

    1. Sneha Sunny profile image84
      Sneha Sunnyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Well I think in the galaxy we can't interpret. But from the earth there must be one star which is visible and largest among all the stars that are visible from earth.

  11. Annasea profile image60
    Annaseaposted 6 years ago

    Sirius was the first star that popped into my mind-- it's the brightest visible from Earth...but then immediately I thought, well, there might be stars bigger but farther, so they would appear less bright than Sirius.

    Then I wondered, 'how do we know how big a star is?' Science is cool, insn't it? No deadends--one question leads to a network of other questions...

    Endlessly fascinating. Well, for dweeby nerd girls like myself. I was born just a tad too early to be cool, but my neice Megan is simpatico and she's completed an elite Penn State computer science degree (her graduation ceremony was a hoot--she's short in stature anyway, and marching to place with the other (mostly boy) students receiving the same degree, she looked like a little munchkin surrounded by giants.

    Ah, geek girl power. I love to see it. She ruled those boys, too. They were in awe of her mind and her ability to organize projects and find unique solutions.

    Plus she's adorably cute. Okay Okay...now I've gone over the line and I'm bragging on my children; well, my brother's children as I have none of my own.

    Conclution? More information needed.

  12. NathanielZhu profile image83
    NathanielZhuposted 6 years ago

    Betelgeuse or Antares or sirius

  13. Annasea profile image60
    Annaseaposted 6 years ago

    NOTE: This is from WIKI and even they admit it's outdated, but it still was the clearest I could find after a few hours of stupid sleepy useless research and I refuse to go any further, so here's my final reply:

    Star name↓     Solar radii (Sun = 1)↓

    VY Canis Majoris     1,800–2,100;
    VV Cephei A     1,600[1][3]–1,900[1][foot 1]
    V838 Monocerotis     1,570 ± 400[4]
    Mu Cephei (Herschel's "Garnet Star")     1,650[5]
    WOH G64     1,540[6]
    V354 Cephei     1,520[5]
    KY Cygni     1,420–2,850[5]
    KW Sagittarii     1,460[5]
    RW Cephei     1,260–1,610[citation needed]
    Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis)     1,180[7][8]
    Antares (Alpha Scorpii)     800[foot 2]
    V382 Carinae     747
    S Pegasi     580[9]
    W Hydrae     562[10]
    T Cephei     540[11]
    S Orionis     530[12]
    R Cassiopeiae     500[13]
    Chi Cygni     470[14]
    Alpha Herculis (Ras Algethi)     460
    Rho Cassiopeiae     450
    119 Tauri ("Ruby Star")[15]     450[16]
    Mira A (Omicron Ceti)     400[17]
    V509 Cassiopeiae     400[18]–900[19]
    S Doradus     100–380[20]
    U Orionis     370±96
    R Doradus     370
    HR Carinae     350
    R Leonis     350[21]
    Nu Aquilae     350
    V337 Carinae     350
    The Pistol Star     340
    S Coronae Borealis     340
    V381 Cephei     327
    Pi Puppis (Ahadi)     290
    Delta Lyrae     275
    Psi Aurigae     271
    Alpha Draconis (Thuban)     265
    CW Leonis     250
    Cygnus OB2-12     244
    Omicron Canis Majoris     231
    Gamma Cygni (Sadir)     225
    Deneb (Alpha Cygni)     220[citation needed]
    La Superba (Y Canum Venaticorum)     215

  14. Annasea profile image60
    Annaseaposted 6 years ago

    It sounded like such a simple question. But there's so much complication. Like much of life: all chaos once you scratch the surface. That's why most of us don't scratch.

    Being part cat, after living with the Fuzzy Ones and, realizing their vast superiority over the Opposable Thumbed Ones, I've aspired and meditated and studied and mind-melded until I've grown claws that can't help but scratch surfaces.

    Visible from Earth. Visible with or without telescope? With infrared telescope? Do giant massive red dead stars that keep accumulating more and more mass till they collapse or explode or something count or only living stars that are relatively stable?

    Sigh. Mew. Nap time. No wonder cats sleep so much. We burn up calories in endless loops of musing that may keep us amused and others bemused but serve no purpose other than to make nap time all the more desireable and dreams more interesting. If I only had a real brain, I'd have the perfect temperment to be a theoretical physicist.

  15. OutWest profile image60
    OutWestposted 5 years ago

    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/5430469_f248.jpg

 
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