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Why did Egypt fall in ancient times

  1. BakerRambles profile image85
    BakerRamblesposted 5 years ago via iphone

    Why did Egypt fail to function as an empire of immortal standards, both politically and militarily?  In a cultural aspect, they are still great today with their ancient monuments and the such, but explain to everyone why you think Egypt fell?  Or explain why you think it didn't, any response works...go ahead don't be shy.

    1. promaine profile image60
      promaineposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      There was a traditional "whiggish" interpretation that, because the Egyptian kingdoms were isolated, they did not have to innovate as much and thus were less creative. This is totally unprovable.

      And by "fell" I'm not sure whether you mean why the kingdom fell to the Persians (military power), Macedonians (unhappiness with/revolt against the Persians), or the Romans (military power); or later to the Arab conquest. Periodically, Egypt has managed to free itself of larger empires and exercise a certain amount of independence (Ptolemies, Mamluks), but improved travel and military technologies (as well as more population density to its west and south) made the Middle Kingdom more vulnerable to external attack and conquest. Today its independence may be a result of Western emphasis on nation-states vs world empires of which it has frequently been an important part.

    2. Rob S profile image82
      Rob Sposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      The Hub “The True Purpose of the Pyramids of Giza” states – “Ramses II’s rein coincided with the time of Moses. Bible history informs us that Moses left Egypt with the Ark of the Covenant. Less than a decade after the reign of Ramses II, Egyptian civilization collapsed.” This Hub proposes the Egyptians had knowledge of and used electricity and the Ark of the Covenant was a key component in the production of electricity.  The Hub suggests the collapse of the Egyptian empire was caused by the loss of means to produce usable electricity.

      1. promaine profile image60
        promaineposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Rob S, thanks for the pointer. I did look at your hub, and while there's a great deal of speculation and inference  in it, I searched in vain for solid evidence to prove that the ancient Egyptians harnessed electricity and made lightbulbs.

        1. Rob S profile image82
          Rob Sposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Your right, there really is no solid proof. Egyptian relief carvings can be interpreted in <i>so</i> many different ways, what one sees as a portrayal of a light-bulb another will interpret as a feather.

  2. TMMason profile image72
    TMMasonposted 5 years ago

    The jews left and the Camel Unions went on strike... it was all down hill from there.









    Sorry couldn't resist.

    1. 0
      Sherlock221bposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      There is no archaeological or written evidence that the Jews were ever slaves in Egypt.  The only place this is mentioned is in the Bible.

      1. TMMason profile image72
        TMMasonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        No sense of humor.

        And I don't think this should spin into another religion vs Atheist thread. Do you?

        1. 0
          Sherlock221bposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I'm not talking about religion, only about archaeology.  Some of us can think about other subjects.

          1. TMMason profile image72
            TMMasonposted 5 years ago in reply to this
  3. MelissaBarrett profile image60
    MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago

    In small part because of a series of poor inundations of the Nile combined with increasing technological advances in irrigation.  It became possible to farm further inland from the river and in different sites along the Nile.  In addition, around that time other fabric alternatives began to replace flax.  That further deterioted Egypts status as a trade center. 

    There were political and societal factors but you'll find through out history that once agriculture and trade positions begin to peter out the society is not too far behind.

  4. BakerRambles profile image85
    BakerRamblesposted 5 years ago via iphone

    Thank you for replying everyone, I think they fell in ratio to the geo physical positioning on the planets surface over the last two thousand years.  Just one observation though out of many

  5. knolyourself profile image59
    knolyourselfposted 4 years ago

    Which Egyptian empire? There were so many of them.

  6. Marquis profile image60
    Marquisposted 3 years ago

    Egypt began to dry out as the soil changed followed by plagues. These are two possible reasons.

  7. janesix profile image60
    janesixposted 2 years ago

    Egypt started out at it's most advanced, and then slowly declined from there.

    Most likely, they lost whatever knowledge it was that made them so advanced in the first place.

 
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