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Is your child's school teaching something that is upsetting you?

  1. lovelypaper profile image67
    lovelypaperposted 5 years ago

    You hear stories all the time about different schools K-12 teaching something that is against your morals or using propaganda to steer your children where you don't want them to go. I believe we as parents need to be aware and stay on top of the public schools to teach the proper curriculum and not try to brainwash (that's a little strong, maybe) but many times we are not made aware of something unless our kid comes home and tells us something that they did in school....

    1. kittythedreamer profile image96
      kittythedreamerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Like what?

    2. Cagsil profile image61
      Cagsilposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      lol lol
      And, what exactly are you referring to?

    3. GNelson profile image82
      GNelsonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Kids in Florida are taught to take a test.  Pass or fail based.   They need to be taught to question everything.  To think for themselves.  To make decisions based on the information that they have.  The graduation rate is very low.

    4. oldhorse profile image80
      oldhorseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I can think of a couple trends in education that upset me.

      Teaching "creation theory" is very annoying.  Scientific thought is something that has taken mankind a long time to develop, and one of the central ideas of scientific thought is that a theory is something that can be experimentally tested.  "Creation theory" conflates theory with belief.  Some people believe mankind was created, which is their right, but it is not a theory, and to describe it as such is a very poor way to explain what science is.

      I also think teaching "abstinence only" is not a good public health policy.

      1. Jeff Berndt profile image89
        Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Those are both frightening trends. Creationism isn't science. It does not belong in science class.

        It could be discussed in a philosophy class, or a social studies class, sure. But don't try to disguise it as science.

        Abstinence only is a bad policy, too, but at least it's not teaching anything that isn't true. It teaches kids that the only guaranteed way to prevent pregnancy and/or VD is not to have sex, which is true. Alas, it doesn't really teach anything else useful.

  2. wilderness profile image95
    wildernessposted 5 years ago

    Do you mean that the schools are teaching unacceptable morality issues?  Or that you want to keep your kids ignorant of the discoveries about the world around them?

    These are two very different issues.  If the school is teaching your kid to steal another kids lunch money (extreme example, I know) then get your kid out of that school pronto.

    If the school is teaching them what we know about the world and you want them to remain ignorant, then back off and let the school do it's job.

    1. TMMason profile image64
      TMMasonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      That begs for a definition of, "what we know of the world".

      1. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Let me re-phrase, then; what careful observation and experimentation tells us is true about the world.

    2. kateperez profile image67
      kateperezposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      The only "like what?" that I can think of is entire classrooms of children chiming in and singing about a person as though they are the greatest thing that ever existed.

      Specifically: and not against the person, but the act by the school:  "Barack Hussein Obama, mmm mmm mmm."   What was the point of that?  No other President was so honored or put to song.... at least not while alive and serving.  Many would take that as indoctrination and not a positive moment in education.

      1. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Good example; that one should, and did, raise a few red flags.

      2. lovelypaper profile image67
        lovelypaperposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        That's the kind of thing I'm talking about.  You  occasionally hear of teachers and some schools pushing their agenda or beliefs on the kids.

      3. Jeff Berndt profile image89
        Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        One class in one school, one time. And it caused a big uproar, as it ought to have done.

        You got any examples of a systemic "like what?"

  3. Polly C profile image88
    Polly Cposted 5 years ago

    Never had any problems at my son's school, in my opinion everything he has learned has been taught in an unbiased and factual manner, from cultural and social issues, to religion, sex education and science.

    He is only just 11 and about to start secondary school in England tomorrow. I have already seen examples of the children's work from the open day, and some really relevant cultural topics have been explored, such as same-sex marriages. I think this is excellent and definitely have no problems with it.

    1. kittythedreamer profile image96
      kittythedreamerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Polly C - Sounds like England has a wonderful education system. When can I move and have my child go to school there? (by the way, this isn't sarcasm, I'm dead serious!) I agree with you 100%.

 
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