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Einstein might be proven wrong!

  1. andycool profile image68
    andycoolposted 5 years ago

    Scientists of the world were left in shock when the world's largest physics lab announced they recorded subatomic particles travelling faster than the speed of light – a feat that Einstein said is impossible.

    Researchers at the CERN lab near Geneva claim they have recorded neutrinos, a type of tiny particle, travelling faster than the barrier of 186,282 miles (299,792 kilometres) per second, i.e., the speed of light.

    If their findings are proven to be accurate, they would overturn one of the pillars of the Standard Model of physics, which explains the way the universe and everything within it works.

    Here's the report: http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-te … 1kuys.html

    1. profile image0
      jomineposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Einstein became wrong, the moment he introduced "observer" in his theory. He went on explaining what the observer sees(like, the speed of light in "reference frame"), rather than what is going on there.....

      1. Cleavey profile image60
        Cleaveyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Actually, the topic of the "observer" can be tied to the anthropic principle; so you really can't say his introduction of an "observer" is rubbish until you understand the anthropic principle in detail.

        1. profile image0
          jomineposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Its just as good as saying god is necessary to understand the universe.
          I'll give one example, Relativity of simultaneity says two events may not be simultaneous in another reference frame. But they are simultaneous by definition, to say it is not, because the light reached the observer/or the observer saw it later, is idiotic!

    2. profile image0
      Home Girlposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Why not? I don't think there are limits to anything in Universe. We just don't know a lot of things yet that are too complicated to our understanding. Science is  s-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o--o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o interesting!

      1. kirstenblog profile image79
        kirstenblogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I agree! big_smile
        I find this sort of stuff just fascinating, and love to hear the scientists themselves so surprised by findings they want others to verify their results just in case. If it proves true that faster then light travel is possible that would open up so many possibilities for future applications in technology. Generally its the application of science in practical invention and engineering makes this stuff exciting, who knows what we might invent as we try to prove faster then light travel?

    3. OutWest profile image59
      OutWestposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      A big IF

  2. Cagsil profile image58
    Cagsilposted 5 years ago

    It's not so much that Einstein would be proven wrong, for the simple fact that Einstein's actual work was incomplete. wink

    1. andycool profile image68
      andycoolposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      No Cags... it's really difficult for me to digest. Unbelievable!

  3. profile image0
    Wentworth35posted 5 years ago

    Watching an interview with the astronomer Sir. Patrick Moore the other day, he is very doubtful of the results, and believes they will be shown to be in error.

    1. andycool profile image68
      andycoolposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Very much possible!

  4. wilderness profile image94
    wildernessposted 5 years ago

    I saw that in my local paper.  Pretty early to draw conclusions, but I was encouraged that the report said that the experimenters were begging for others to try the experiment and see if they could duplicate it.

    1. andycool profile image68
      andycoolposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It came really as a shocker to me! Einstein wrong... just can't believe! roll

      1. wilderness profile image94
        wildernessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        It is the way of learning.  Fact A is accepted for many years, then a new set of circumstances or environment is found where Fact A does not apply.  We continue to learn this way.

  5. profile image0
    Home Girlposted 5 years ago

    We believe in fact then we make a dogma out of it, and we realy should not.
    I read that microworld has its own rules.

    1. andycool profile image68
      andycoolposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Completely agree... but when you see your childhood role-model is going to be dethroned, it's hard to digest. Isn't it?

      We're only humans! smile

    2. wilderness profile image94
      wildernessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Very true - the quantum world does not follow the rules of the macro world we live in and experience. 

      It's a part of what makes it so very hard to get a grip on - the rules often run contrary to what our experience in the macro world tells us.

      1. andycool profile image68
        andycoolposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Dear wilderness, thanks for trying to understand my feeling... I always welcome new and new findings of science to replace the old ones.

        1. wilderness profile image94
          wildernessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          It's fun and exciting.  It's just so d*** hard with quantum theory!  Maybe I'm just getting old.

  6. Ron Montgomery profile image59
    Ron Montgomeryposted 5 years ago

    Einstein was wrong?  Could Palin be next? yikes

  7. Cleavey profile image60
    Cleaveyposted 5 years ago

    Oh  no, I might have to change my profile picture!

    1. Ron Montgomery profile image59
      Ron Montgomeryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Don't worry, you still make a great bagel. Quantum physicists can never take that from you.

  8. A Troubled Man profile image61
    A Troubled Manposted 5 years ago

    1987a was a supernova discovered in which the light reached Earth in that year, just 3 hours after the neutrinos. It is thought that due to the dense cloud of gas and dust, the photons bounced around before finally getting through while the neutrinos streamed through.

    If we factor in the results from the CERN experiment extrapolating the distances involved, photons from 1987a should have reached us 3.2 years after the neutrinos.

  9. profile image0
    Nonsense Debunkerposted 5 years ago

    Realising that men beleived his ideas, Einstein himself was amazed! He concluded;

    "There are only 2 infinite things, the universe and HUMAN STUPIDITY and I am not sure of the former!"

    Surely, it takes infinite stupidity!!

  10. Randy Godwin profile image94
    Randy Godwinposted 5 years ago

    Imagine what Al could have accomplished with today's super computers at his disposal.  Give him a break, will ya!  smile

 
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