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A neutrino

  1. BakerRambles profile image85
    BakerRamblesposted 5 years ago via iphone

    Is a neutrino considered darkmatter?

    1. paradigmsearch profile image89
      paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thinking.

      1. emrldphx profile image60
        emrldphxposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Are you feeling ok there buddy? big_smile

        1. paradigmsearch profile image89
          paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          ?

          1. emrldphx profile image60
            emrldphxposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            ??

            <--- Is confused tongue

      2. BakerRambles profile image85
        BakerRamblesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        That's has got to be the best response I have ever heard anyone say in my life,  thank you.

    2. paradigmsearch profile image89
      paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      :

  2. knolyourself profile image59
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    Via iphone. My opinion there is no dark matter. It was created to prop up the big bang theory.

    1. emrldphx profile image60
      emrldphxposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It doesn't really prop up the Big Bang theory so much as it props up our theory of Gravity.

      As an interesting side-note, neutrinos were discovered because there was a problem with radiation levels from supernovae. We decided there had to be something else that we couldn't see, we called it a 'neutrino', and we went looking for it. We're at the same stage with dark matter that we were with neutrinos not too long ago.(I apologize, but this is a simplified overview of neutrinos).

  3. emrldphx profile image60
    emrldphxposted 5 years ago

    No, a neutrino isn't dark matter.

    Dark matter is something that needs to exist for gravity to work the way it does, according to our current understanding of gravity. In other words, the same gravity that works on earth, works without dark matter. But, the same gravity isn't sufficient to hold galaxies together without dark matter.

  4. paradigmsearch profile image89
    paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago

    A neutrino has many possibilities. I wish to hear more.

  5. knolyourself profile image59
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    I never looked for things. I use random experience. If I were to look for things I might find what I am looking for, whether it exists or not.

    1. paradigmsearch profile image89
      paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I have to agree with this...

  6. paradigmsearch profile image89
    paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago

    I guess I must have figured where I might have been. Or not.

  7. paradigmsearch profile image89
    paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago

    omg , lol. diary issues

  8. knolyourself profile image59
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    "It doesn't really prop up the Big Bang theory so much as it props up our theory of Gravity."
    Would that be because things are suppose to be moving in a way consistent with the big bang theory, but since they are not there must be something holding it all back.

    1. emrldphx profile image60
      emrldphxposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      No. Actually, the Big Bang theory suggested that the Universe would slow down in its acceleration and eventually collapse in on itself, but we are finding that to not be the case.

      It has to do with experiments that were done with bending light, modelling galaxies, etc... When researchers modeled the Milky Way with the same model of gravity that we use on earth, stars and solar systems just flew violently out of orbit in the simulations. They had to crank up gravity by something like 500% to get it to work properly. The only way that gravity could be that high, is for there to be matter that we can't see yet.

      The Big Bang problem with acceleration is being addressed with dark energy, which is completely different than dark matter. The word 'dark' is just used because it's something we can't detect right now.

      1. BakerRambles profile image85
        BakerRamblesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Would that mean that no matter what instant and where we are standing in accordance to everything and nothing, the free flying particles that are everywhere it seems in spurts are neutrinos.  I have found that neutrinos are formed from solar flares, among others such as supernovas, black hole events, etc, that in the moment creates a single, and sometimes grouped neutrino compacts.  I believe that these articles are the concept behind the gravity of the universe as a whole.  It's as if saying, just as elements have so many electrons, neutrons, and protons, and each sub group has a gravity lined center, nucleus, that holds it together. 

        Planets=particles on micro scale, would give rise to ever deceasing sizes of things, planet, human, ant, micro organism, protons, neutrinos, ?, ?, ?, and so forth

  9. knolyourself profile image59
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    Good explanation.

  10. Hollie Thomas profile image60
    Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago

    What on earth are you all talking about? Lost.

  11. paradigmsearch profile image89
    paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago

    The old trino was the site of the Enrico Fermi Nuclear Power Plant.

    The new trinos live in a commune in Italy.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trino

 
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