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Public Schools for One Gender

  1. Stacie L profile image87
    Stacie Lposted 8 years ago

    Hello and good Sunday to all!
    The frigid weather is finally letting up and we will reach 50 degrees today! Woohoo.

    Anyway as a former public school teacher I think that the public school format needs an overhaul.
    The local and state education organizations  have tried different programs over the years to improve the achievement scores of students,but it doesn't  seem to be enough.
    Many parents have given up on public education and enrolled their children on private school ,charter schools or home school them .
    What do you think of single sex public schools? Should schools go totally one gender or should schools create  single sex
    classes instead?
    hmm

  2. knolyourself profile image60
    knolyourselfposted 8 years ago

    My guess would be that student achievement, while probably having some positive affect by gender separation, has more to do with the class and educational level of the parents. 'Round here the best schools have the most Asians, meaning those households demand high grades of their kids, or so I would think.

  3. Marisa Wright profile image92
    Marisa Wrightposted 8 years ago

    I'm against single sex schools because I think for early teens in particular, they foster an unhealthy attitude to the opposite sex.

    I went to a co-ed school, where in our early teens we girls generally regarded the boys with disdain - we knew only too well what pimply, uncouth little animals they were!   At the same age, my sister and her friends - who went to a single-sex school - regarded boys as mysterious and attractive.  The girls from the girls' only school would seek out boys and were certainly indulging in sexual activities long before the girls from the co-ed.

    1. Stacie L profile image87
      Stacie Lposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      These are good points. Educators only want students to achieve more in school by not being attracted or distracted by the opposite sex,I suppose.
      What they do outside is another story.hmm

    2. VENUGOPAL SIVAGNA profile image60
      VENUGOPAL SIVAGNAposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Well said. To hide a thing means arouse curiosity on it.  Let it be limited to an extent.  When we coexist in a family, why should there be a separate public school for one gender?

  4. knolyourself profile image60
    knolyourselfposted 8 years ago

    Marisa Wright: Excellent point.

  5. aka-dj profile image80
    aka-djposted 8 years ago

    I went to a co-ed school till year 6, then went to a (rather prestigious) boys only high school for two years. After that, my family moved to a new city, interstate, where I again ended up at a co-ed high school. There were pro's and cons to both schools, in my mind.
    Boys only, made us more curious about girls, but gave us somewhat limited experience relating to girls during my teens. It was (much) more challenging meeting (strange) girls.
    Co-ed was better on that front, but rivalries etc came to the surface.
    Eg. I want to ask "so & so" out, but she's dating "him", then the other girl was dating "whoever" etc.
    Better, or worse, one vs the other? Don't know. Horses for courses. I guess it could be beneficial in some circumstances.

    1. Stacie L profile image87
      Stacie Lposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Yes, boys are are curious about girls and vice-versa.They do get to associate outside of school at social events hopefully. hmm

      1. aka-dj profile image80
        aka-djposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        HOPEFULLY. That's the key word.
        If a boy has a good social network of family and friends, he's ok.
        In my case, because I was a foreign immigrant, with obvious ethinc differences to the culture I was in,made it a little restricted.
        BTW, I am still a normally developed human being. I don't think I suffered adversley from the experience. smile

      2. Marisa Wright profile image92
        Marisa Wrightposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        Yes that's true Stacie - the problem with students from single-sex schools (in my experience) is that because their curiosity isn't satisfied, it builds up to a fever pitch.  Then when they do get a chance to associate with the opposite sex at social events, they really - er - associate.

        1. Stacie L profile image87
          Stacie Lposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          hahahaha big_smile

  6. ngureco profile image85
    ngurecoposted 8 years ago

    Education and learning seems to yield better results if:

    (a) Between the ages 0 – 12 years, any education and learning should be done in classes of mixed boys and girls.

    (b) Between ages 13 – 18 years, boys and girls should be separated in schools.

    (c) Thereafter, any education and learning should be done in classes of mixed gals and guys.

  7. barranca profile image73
    barrancaposted 8 years ago

    I think it should be an option.  I have taught in both coed and single-sex schools.  I know for a fact they can be of immense benefit to the majority of girls that attend them.  I don't normally link one of my hubs, but it pertains precisely to the topic.

    http://hubpages.com/hub/The_benefits_of … ex_schools

  8. LondonGirl profile image92
    LondonGirlposted 8 years ago

    I went to single-sex public schools aged 4 to 18 (3 schools altogether, 2 days schools in London, and one boarding school in the Home Counties) and I think they are, on the whole, a good thing, particularly for girls. My sisters went to the same two day schools, and my brother to Dulwich College and then Westminster.

    I have this vague feeling, though, that Americans interpret "public school" differently from here in the UK - by public school, I mean my parents paid for it.

    1. Stacie L profile image87
      Stacie Lposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Yes, LondonGirl; you are correct in your interpretation of the "public school" term over here in the states.
      A public school is supported by tax dollars and is open to everyone.There is no charge for attending big_smile.

      1. Nickny79 profile image87
        Nickny79posted 8 years ago in reply to this

        There is a charge for attending!  It's called my wasted tax money.

  9. LondonGirl profile image92
    LondonGirlposted 8 years ago

    Here, those are state schools. Some are still single-sex, and pretty much all schools, state and public / private schools, have uniforms.

 
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