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What Are Daydreams?

  1. ThinkSomething profile image60
    ThinkSomethingposted 5 years ago

    Today I thought about daydreams. And I would like to know what they are? And what are their significance? And to help in answering my questions I gave a brief history of "The Daydream".

    Daydreams were first questioned back in the late 19th century by a man named Toni Nelson and he thought that daydreams were attempts by someones brain to fulfill one's wants and desires. Whether they were as simple as wanting to eat a candy bar or as complex as wanting to find the love of their life, Nelson thought daydreams assisted in easing the mind or helping these wants take the back burner for a short while when the daydream was completed. Then, in the 1950's, daydreams caught the attention of people once again. This time they were educational psychologists and (unlike Mr. Nelson) they believed that daydreams could make children become neurotic and in some cases psychotic. They felt this way because when the mind is in a state of neurosis it can go almost completely unseen to the naked eye, and that's why it is referred to as the "invisible injury". As for psychosis, well that disorder is characterized by a "loss of contact with reality" which some people may think they have experience after "awakening" from a daydream. So, basically because it is almost impossible to tell what a person is daydreaming about they labeled it as something to be avoided. But then, in 1966, two psychologists (Jerome L. Singer of Yale University and John S. Antrobus of the City College of New York) finally applied science to the questions surrounding the daydream by, ironically enough, creating a questionnaire called the Imaginal Processes Inventory (IPI). The IPI consisted of 344 multiple choice, and short answer questions and was quite helpful in the investigation of the effect daydreams have on people's psychological well being. But, it would be almost another 20 years after this breakthrough until someone would be able to produce concrete data on daydreams. The researcher responsible for this data was a man by the name of Eric Klinger, and his numbers were not too surprising. According to Klinger 75% of workers who occupied "boring jobs" used vivid daydreams to "ease the boredom" they would face while at work.

    So anyway, could you guys help me? What do you think a daydream is exactly? And what is the significance of daydreams? Leave your answers in the comment section below, and have a nice day.

    - Deep Sea

    1. couturepopcafe profile image60
      couturepopcafeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      All true but academics always tend to make too much of something.

      Daydreams can serve as an escape from the reality we are experiencing at the moment, work, school, parents. They take us to the place we really prefer to be but can't at the moment. No big psychological evaluation or academic degree necessary to figure that out, IMO. smile

      1. Lisa HW profile image83
        Lisa HWposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I'd agree with this.  I haven't done any day-dreaming since I've been grown up; but when I was a kid I'd imagine up one scenario or another (a day-dream) involving something I wanted to do, or somewhere I'd like to be, and I'd have a great time doing it.  smile  There was no psychosis or neurosis or anything else involved.  It was an occasional pastime, particularly when I didn't have anything all that interesting to do.  (In other words, when I was bored because I was a kid and couldn't do the stuff I wanted to do.)   My girlfriend confessed to daydreaming too, so she and I would re-enjoy our respective daydreams by sharing our own, discussing them, and imagining how wonderful things could one day be.   It was just fun for kids too young to drive and work.  When we got old enough to drive and work and date that was it for the daydreams (at least for me).  So, I think daydreams can be "heavily associated" with being a kid.  I can see how some adults may have the need/wish to engage in daydreaming.  I just haven't since I've been (again) old enough to do the stuff I was once too young to do.  smile  Since I've been grown-up, if I've had a tedious or boring task/job to do, I'll either make a "mental game/challenge" out of getting the task done or else imagine music while I'm doing the work.

      2. SomewayOuttaHere profile image61
        SomewayOuttaHereposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        that sums it up nicely.....big_smile.....daydreaming or as i call it "clearing my mind"....it's an escape...relaxing the mind for a moment - alpha waves comes to mind...some of us forget how to do it as we get older...kids do it quite often

        1. Lisa HW profile image83
          Lisa HWposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I think lots of times life gets in the way when we're grown-ups.  We need our brain time for thinking about stuff other than daydreams.  hmm 

          Hmm.  I think I'll schedule a daydream session for Monday.  (Let's see...  That's Monday, April 2, 2012)    I'm penciling it in for 3:00 p.m., but I may need to change that to 3:45 (depending...).   I'll have to also set aside some time for figuring out what I can daydream about (a pre-daydreaming session), so I'm thinking, maybe, Sunday morning at 11:30, after Meet the Press is over.   (Do daydreams have to be spontaneous, I wonder?)   (I do think I may have forgotten how to daydream...   hmm )

          1. SomewayOuttaHere profile image61
            SomewayOuttaHereposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            big_smile...maybe you have forgotten  lol about the pre-daydreaming session....that's exactly why it's needed..i call it clearing my mind..because of life...gives me a rest...yeah?.....put those pearls on and see what happens  lol.....it's good to run into you Lisa  big_smile

            1. Lisa HW profile image83
              Lisa HWposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Good to run into you too.   smile  (a temporary straying from the thread topic coming up for a second):    Pearls!  Guess what:  I've been shopping for mother-of-the-bride dresses.  Guess how many of them commit the crime of pearls!!!!!    mad  I refuse to show up at my daughter's wedding looking like Barbara Bush or June Cleaver.  lol    (returning this thread to its regularly scheduled program now....)   smile

              1. SomewayOuttaHere profile image61
                SomewayOuttaHereposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                lol  oh no!  poor you...you'll make it  big_smile

  2. profile image0
    klarawieckposted 5 years ago

    Do you mean to tell me there are "nightdreams"?

    1. viveresperando profile image81
      viveresperandoposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      yes

      1. profile image0
        klarawieckposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I wouldn't know... I live in La-la-land.

        1. viveresperando profile image81
          viveresperandoposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          that is okay i often visit  a place i call " a place where nothing is real" lol we must be neighbors... lol i am the neighbor with the pink willow trees that bloom many different colors of roses

          1. profile image0
            klarawieckposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Oh, Yes! I recognize the tree! I know exactly where you live!

            1. viveresperando profile image81
              viveresperandoposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              hey is your house the one by the waterfall?

              1. profile image0
                klarawieckposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Yeah... yeah... the pink waterfall with the toad/frog barbershop quartet!

                1. viveresperando profile image81
                  viveresperandoposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Nice, did you see that sexy cowboy that has the pet dragon?  Does he live around here?

                  1. profile image0
                    klarawieckposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    Uh... yeah... that's my husband! yikes

  3. Jojosi profile image59
    Jojosiposted 5 years ago

    Daydreaming in childhood, would not that be what is called 'wishful' thinking in adulthood?  There are a lot of adults who make decisions according to what is pleasing to the imagination instead of leaning on reality or evidence.

 
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