What is Idealism?

Idealism is the philosophical theory that reality is essentially mental or spiritual. Idealism is opposed to materialism, the theory that reality is physical. In philosophy there are two schools of idealism. The older school, which began with the ancient Greek philosopher Plato, is called objective idealism. It maintains that reality consists of ideal, immaterial forms existing outside the mind and that the material world is merely a pale reflection of the ideal world. Philosophers of the school of subjective idealism, on the other hand, maintain that reality exists only in the mind and that what are known as physical objects have no existence outside the mind.

Immanuel Kant claimed that knowledge does not come wholly through experience.
Immanuel Kant claimed that knowledge does not come wholly through experience.

Subjective Idealism

The major philosophers of subjective idealism were Bishop George Berkeley (1685-1753) and David Hume (1711-1776). As a student at Trinity College in Dublin, Berkeley studied the works of John Locke (1632-1704), which greatly influenced the development of his idealistic theories. Locke had held that a distinction can be made between what he considered the primary qualities of an object, such as its size, shape, and motion, and its secondary qualities, such as color, odor, and taste. He claimed that only the primary qualities belong to the object. The secondary qualities exist in the mind of the person perceiving the object. A rose has a certain size and shape, but without an eye to perceive them it has no color.

Berkeley carried Locke's theory further and contended that both primary and secondary qualities exist in the mind. If one imagines seeing an apple hanging from a limb, he is certain only of the sensation and of the idea aroused in his mind of an apple and a limb. He is not at all certain of the actual existence of the objects. Whereas Locke had maintained that notions about an object originated in the object, Berkeley denied the very existence of the object. He concluded that reality consists only of minds and their ideas and that these ultimately depend on the mind of God.

The Scottish philosopher David Hume pressed subjective idealism to its logical conclusion. He maintained that if he could not posit the existence of objects, he could not believe in the existence of other minds. If he rigorously applied Berkeley's theory, he would have to exclude everything but the one fact of his own mental existence. This extreme position is called solipsism. Hume claimed the objective realist would have to deny even the existence of his own mind and affirm his own existence as being no more than a chain of sensations or impressions.

Hume's skeptical position inspired the German philosopher Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) to find a way out of the dilemma. Kant claimed that knowledge does not come wholly through experience, but that the mind has to impose forms on nature before man can understand his experiences. He emphasized the structure of nature, rather than its qualities. He held that certain forms, such as those of space and time, are not to be found in nature or through experience and that they must therefore arise in the mind. Kant was thus able to affirm the mind's existence. However, Kant was not a thoroughgoing idealist. He believed that objects exist physically outside the mind, but he claimed that man can never fully understand the essential nature of objects. Kant called this his thing-in-itself theory. Kant's theories concerning logic and mathematics and such forms as space and time led to objective idealism, which is the theory that forms exist independent of man.

Objective Idealism

The German philosopher Georg W. F. Hegel (1770-1831) used Kant's theories to ┬╗the the objective existence of nature. Hegel an idealist in that he stressed the spiritual char-of the world. Unlike Berkeley and Hume, he maintained that much of what is real lies outside the mind and that the individual human mind is only a fragment of the Absolute, or the all-embracing realm of Spirit. Hegel further contended that the world must be an intelligible system in order to be understood. His central doctrine is that "the real is rational", or that the world is a logical system and philosophy is the attempt by the human mind to understand it.

Hegel's philosophy led to several conclusions, one of which was determinism, the belief that nothing happens merely by chance. Another belief is that the nature of an object can be understood only by comprehending its relation to the whole reality, called the Absolute.

Other objective idealists who followed Hegel were the British philosophers Thomas Hill Green '1836-1882) and Francis Herbert Bradley (1846-1924), the American philosopher Josiah Royce (1855-1916), and the Italian philosopher Benedetto Croce (1866-1952).

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Comments 11 comments

easy1 profile image

easy1 7 years ago from Ireland

great summary, Who told Hume kick a rock and then see is it his imagination?.


ASHOK PANDYA 6 years ago

BEST


Darryl 6 years ago

George Berkeley's immaterialism (subjective idealism) is correct. Nothing exists outside the mind. With one omnipresent mind (God) keeping everything in existance.


The truth 5 years ago

Idealism is correct. All is mind.


My Esoteric profile image

My Esoteric 5 years ago from Keystone Heights, FL

But why does Berkeley stop at God? Why should that be the one exception to his rule? Flip the question around, if there can be one exception, why can't there be others?

Also, when I first heard the rose having size and shape but no color, I had to stop and wonder about this. It might be just semantic games but what color really is is the name humans give to the sensation that results from the translation our brain makes of the nerve impulses that were initiated by a particular frequency of light waves reaching the optic nerve that were generated as a result of light interacting with the electrons contained within the rose in the first place. These light waves which resulted from light falling on the rose, in my opinion, exists independent of the human mind just as size and shape exist independently. Color, it would seem to me, is perceived in exactly the same way as both size and shape.


My Esoteric profile image

My Esoteric 5 years ago from Keystone Heights, FL

But why does Berkeley stop at God? Why should that be the one exception to his rule? Flip the question around, if there can be one exception, why can't there be others?

Also, when I first heard the rose having size and shape but no color, I had to stop and wonder about this. It might be just semantic games but what color really is is the name humans give to the sensation that results from the translation our brain makes of the nerve impulses that were initiated by a particular frequency of light waves reaching the optic nerve that were generated as a result of light interacting with the electrons contained within the rose in the first place. These light waves which resulted from light falling on the rose, in my opinion, exists independent of the human mind just as size and shape exist independently. Color, it would seem to me, is perceived in exactly the same way as both size and shape.


My Esoteric profile image

My Esoteric 5 years ago from Keystone Heights, FL

One has to wonder why, if Berkeley can see his way clear to not being certain that an apple hanging on a tree is actually real but only certain that it is an image in his mind, that same logic doesn't apply to his image of God as well? How is he certain that God is real?

Also, when I first heard the rose having size and shape but no color, I had to stop and wonder about this. It might be just semantic games but what color really is is the name humans give to the sensation that results from the translation our brain makes of the nerve impulses that were initiated by a particular frequency of light waves reaching the optic nerve that were generated as a result of light interacting with the electrons contained within the rose in the first place. These light waves which resulted from light falling on the rose, in my opinion, exists independent of the human mind just as size and shape exist independently. Color, it would seem to me, is perceived in exactly the same way as both size and shape.


Gilbert Albans 5 years ago

Berkeley stopped at God because he said God was a thinking thing, and we are aware of ourselves being able to think. He also said that we only find thinking things, like ourselves to be active, and that our sense impressions are passive. We notice no activity in them. Berkeley held that there was a cause to our sense impressions, and for something to be a cause of another thing, there had to be activity, and activity only resides in a mind. Thus, Berkeley held that a mind was giving us sense impressions. This thing causing these sense impressions was a thinking thing, and was said to be the mind of God. There is no need to assert that there something else that is not a mind to cause what we experience, especially when we have no experience of such a thing.


Tapan Deka 4 years ago

Its pragmatism since pre Plato's time has been observed. The relationship between realia and the image of that realia in the mind is the reflection of objective and subjective idealism differently......................


Joseph041167 profile image

Joseph041167 3 years ago from Nashville TN 37206.

I read this, clicked like, and put useful, because it is. I am not an idealist, probably not. I hold to Metaphysical Naturalistic Causation, and by your definition, would be a materialist. I believe if a tree falls in a forest and nobody experienced it, it still really fell, and it can be measured scientifically, teams can go out, find it, study it. Furthermore, all human experience can be broken down to electricity acting upon chemical processes which involve nuero-transmitters, hormones, and others. Break it down further, and it reduces to numbers, the whole universe is numbers doing equations. A step up from that and it involves electricity, or some form of energy, acting upon chemicals or physical constructs. ??? maybe??? Currently I do not believe in an immaterial soul, or anything beyond Metaphysical Naturalistic Causation. I believe in a hard, real, physical world, that can be measured, and exists independent of the human mind. Do we not know this by now? I am not being rude, I am asking? This is not just opinion??? Sorry and thank you for my two cents, I appreciate it.


amjadakhtar 3 years ago

i find it quite comprehensive. it has cleared my concepts

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