How to use music to enhance your child’s life

child listening to music



“Kids: They dance before they learn there is anything that isn’t music” ~William Stafford

Music is an artistic form of communicating by hearing, rather than visually. Parents have used chimes or other musical toys to babysit while they prepare a bottle. Music can interrupt a crying baby, and instantly convert a tearful face to one with smiles. Babies are naturally attuned to sounds, patterns and tones and will respond with movement before they can stand on their own. I often sang to my babies to get them to sleep.

During your child’s developmental years, you can help to enhance his imagination and reading skills by introducing him to a variety of sounds. Because music is “right brain” friendly, it makes sense. A creative child can learn the alphabet by singing songs that are associated with the letters even before he can see the letters. He will memorize in the same way he does books before ever learning to read.

My friend’s preschooler listened to New Age and Semi-Classical music. Before he could speak he was able to get his favorite CD and hand to his father simply because he knew what he wanted to hear. Mozart, the great classical musician, was credited for the effect of listening to classical music. Researchers claim that listening to classical music patterns developed more neurons in the brain that would increase logical thinking, as complex rhythms led to complex understanding. On the other hand, music that had consistent repetitive patterns would have a lesser effect.

For years, researchers have tested the response to music as it relates to learning and a healthy mind. Without any pressure, your child can learn in a fun way through musical aids. The message music sends may be subliminal; however, students have listened to music on their headphones when preparing for tests or when exercising.

As an artist, I enjoy painting as well as cooking to music because it sets a very inspiring tone. With music, we can help our children to develop their creativity from as early as the cradle.

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