Slang Around the World - What's Up With That?

Source

Say What?

No one knows where or when the word 'slang' was actually incorporated into our language. The meaning is highly debated among those who study language. Linguistic experts often disagree about what slang is and what it isn't.

It isn't colloquialism, jargon or dialect. In fact, slang is many times a result of differences between cultural dialects. People would commonly misunderstand the pronunciation of words and their attempts to borrow the words might result in a different pronunciation or meaning.

Maybe it really is all about semantics!

Colloquialism is language that is more familiar that people commonly use when speaking with friends or relatives. It is a more relaxed way of speaking - informal. Currently, some popular words are "hot" as in "that's hot." or "dumped" as in "he dumped me!" These are words that are understood by most people in a large area.

Jargon is vocabulary used among members of a trade or might be specific to a subject. For example, computer gibberish or medical terminology. The people that work in that field may understand this babble but people unfamiliar with the field would not know the meaning.

Slang is more of a code that is developed so that outsiders can not understand what is being communicated. It is a lexicon of vocabulary terms developed to aid a group in covert activity.

Dialect is the language shared among a group of people which includes, grammar, vocabulary and the pronunciation of the words.

Source

Can you Cant?

Cant is the secret language or code that was used in the criminal cosmos to prevent outsiders from understanding what they were saying to each other ... convicts, thieves, pickpockets, or Gypsy's used this way of speaking. This language began to appear around the 17th Century in England. Dictionaries were made in an effort to "protect the public" so people would be able to identify these words.

"Vocabulum" or "The Rogue's Lexicon," was published in 1859. It was the first known dictionary in America by George Matsell, the Chief of Police of New York. Harvard College published "A Dictionary of Modern Slang, Cant and Vulgar language," in 1859 as well. It says:

"Cant is by some people derived from one Andrew Cant, who, they say, was a Presbyterian Minister in some illiterate part of Scotland, who by exercise and use had obtained the faculty, alias gift, of talking in the pulpit in such a dialect that 'tis said he was not understood by none but his own congregation, - and not by all of them."

Slang and Cant were seen as objectionable, low class or disreputable people. The first English Dictionary was published in an attempt to stop the spread of slang. It was a book that was made up of proper English vocabulary words.

Cant was used in saloons, or gambling houses - houses of ill repute! The language was used to limit the understanding of the larger group.

Irish Slang

Scottish Slang

British Slang

The Midnight Ride

Folk hero, Paul Revere, was a Master Engraver and an accomplished Silversmith but he is best known for The Midnight Ride. Revere became a mounted messenger in 1770 for the Whig Patriots. He rode his horse to locations in New York, Philadelphia and other areas throughout New England. This group had a code they made to warn John Hancock and Samuel Adams that the Red Coats were coming. Revere came up with a warning signal in the event that the British came to attack. He told the other members to signal him by placing a lit lantern in the belfry of the Old North Church, "one if by land and two if by sea." Revere received his signal and went from village to village to deliver his message on that dark night. Slang was the language that helped keep activities covert.

War Slang or Trench Slang was popular during wars because it also helped the soldiers to distance themselves from reality. They used language as a mental block to disconnect from harsh cruelties they were exposed to on a daily basis. Words that were a train wreck of French mixed with English became a vocabulary.

  • Alley was used as a word of warning to indicate "run away! go!" It was derived from the French word "allez" which means "to go."
  • Boko was used to mean "a lot or much." This word most likely came from the French word "beaucoup".
  • Toot Sweet was used to mean "quick". This word was probably derived from "toute de suite" which means "right away.

Many slang words came to be simply because the pronunciation was misunderstood and the errors transferred to another language. The videos included are a great example of how dialect can be confusing to non natives. Each person is clearly speaking English in each one but the dialect is so unfamiliar to our ears that we can not comprehend exactly what is being said. Those words may make their way around the entire world changing ever so slightly each time it is borrowed by another culture.

Aussie Slang

How Slang Travels

During the 18th century there were thousands of British prisoners who were brought to America by ship. They were chained together and forced to serve out sentences in the U.S. These travelers used slang. The dialect was unfamiliar to Americans so many slang words are derived from that period. British colonists, the abolitionist movement and the Westward movement also helped to spread slang.

It was frowned upon as it made it's way like a virus into the fabric of cultures everywhere. The Mafia developed their own language so they could not be easily understood. Mafia lingo was the only slang that was kept really secret. They did not share their vocabulary with other groups and have always been famous for their code of silence.

In the 1920s, post war slang gained favorable use and popularity. Writers loved it. (Of course - blame it on the writers)! Mass media and fiction, films! All of these things with an increased demand for entertainment. Fiction was kicked up a notch by using the slangy terms. The language that was once considered damaged there was now a proclivity and people had a penchant for it.

Slang is now used everywhere, is widely accepted and has lost most of it's negative connotation.

Funny Shit Canadians Say

It's the Double Dutch Bus! Fo Shizzle - Ferizzle!

What's the Shizzle?

Frankie Smith, Philadelphia resident, applied and was rejected for a job at the bus station. He was upset but changed his tune. Smith turned his frown upside down and wrote a song about it. Wanna hear it? Many people did - it quickly rose to top the billboards as the number one song for eight weeks in 1981. This particular song is credited for spreading the popularity of the "izzle" or "izz" into a multitude of slang language around the globe.

Music is another way that slang is commonly spread to masses of people.

Source

Internet Slang

Communication changes and advances in technology have allowed slang to infect the computer world. Texting and IM's are ever popular. The need to shorten words and phrases for convenience has elicited a whole new slang language. Internet slang. Teenagers everywhere are now able to communicate in code right beneath our noses while they sit right next to us on the lofty sofa chatting away in silence on laptops, iPads, phones or Kindle Fires. Do you think you know what they are talking about? Take a look at a few text terms and let's see if you're all that.

Are you familiar with this text lingo?

  • PAW - Parents are Watching
  • Code 9 - Parents are around
  • NIFOC - Naked in front of computer
  • S2R - Send to receive
  • TDTM - Talk dirty to me
  • PRON - Porn
  • P911 - Parent emergency

Do you know the code?

Slang will always be omnipresent and ever changing. As soon as the words become common knowledge it is no longer useful to the criminal element and new words will replace the old words. Then writers such as myself will lust after them, borrowing and entertaining the masses through music, movies, television, gangs, books and magazines.

"All slang is metaphor, and all metaphor is poetry." ~ Gilbert K. Chesterton

What goes around comes around?

I asked my Facebook friends what the popular slang in their area is at the current time and this is what's good in the neighborhood.

Tina from the UK had a favorite when she lived in Liverpool - it was "saffy" which means "this afternoon" as in "I will meet you for lunch this afternoon." shortened to "Meet you saffy."

Tammy from Pennsylvania laughs when she hears "don't be getting all up in my Kool-aid when you don't know what the flavor is."

Austinstar from Texas has a current favorite local slang saying and it is "that dog won't hunt." as in "that politician is an incompetent moron."

Missolive from Texas is a teacher so she hears quite a few slang terms. Most recently she had to chuckle upon hearing "butt hurt." as in "don't get your butt hurt." in place of "don't get your feelings hurt".

What area are you from? What slang words or phrases do you hear? Please post them in the comments section - it would be interesting to know which words will spread from your neighborhood to mine.

More by this Author


Comments 101 comments

BRIAN SLATER profile image

BRIAN SLATER 4 years ago from Nottingham Uk

Well Kelly this was enlightening! TDTM ha-ha I have never heard of these before I probably don't move in these circles where these are expressed but I was surprised by your knowledge. A well written hub WTG girl you rock. Voted up awesome :)


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hey Brian - thank you so much! You actually helped me come up with the idea of it...when we were chatting about text lingo and what it means! lol I owe ya:)


Curiad profile image

Curiad 4 years ago from Lake Charles, LA.

Awesome kelly! There a few I never heard :)


diogenes profile image

diogenes 4 years ago from UK and Mexico

I really enjoyed this! Two years ago I wrote a book on Mexican slang as they have a very rich vein of street talk, much of it sexual and double entendres. I was amused to see the slang youngsters are using on the Internet. Much dies and changes as we progress through time, but slang adds much to language and in the way people communicate.

Bob


billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

You did one hell of a lot of research on this one Kelly and it is so well done. Excellent job and pretty darn interesting to boot! :)

Loved the hub!


Ruchira profile image

Ruchira 4 years ago from United States

LMAO...Kelly.

Slang is used more than anything these days as a result the English language is getting in the dungeons.

Honestly, I get all the input of the latest slangs from my 8 year old and boy, he sure knows quite a bit for his age...lol

while i am a blake (australian slang for a country side person...lol)

good topic to hub upon and was very entertaining listening to the videos.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

This was a great hub on slang! I think I need to go and grab a 60 pounder at the lick-bo. Translation I need to go and grab a 60 ounce bottle at the Ontario Liquor Control Board. The first time I heard lick-bo ... I was like What! Once it was explained to me it made total sense. Slang can be so confusing sometimes especially if you're visiting a place you've never been before and have no idea what is being said.

Great Hub. Hitting all the buttons and sharing everywhere!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi Mark - and thank you very much! That is what is up:) lol


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hey Bob - that is so cool! What is the name of the book - may I link it here? I have always been really interested in codes, languages and communication. It does change a lot and sometimes because it gets so wide spread everyone knows the word so it's no longer secret:) lol I suppose once the video hits the internet it is back to the drawing board!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi billybuc - oh I did a lot of reading and fact checking. At least it was interesting and I spared you the boring parts:) lol

Thank you so much!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hey Ruchira! That is funny! We do hear a lot from our kids if we are listening huh? I know I hear new stuff everyday and I know those little curtain climbers are trying to be secretive:) lol

Well you sure are a pretty blake! haha

Thank you so much! I had fun with this one too:) I am such a kid.


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi Susan - Oh I was laughing so much watching that video:) I couldn't wait to share it with you! lol lick-bo? That is awesome! omg! I would be raising my eyebrows for sure!

Excellent comment with a great point too - yeah visitors are often confused by the simplest things sometimes - say the difference between asking for a "soda" instead of "pop" is one I think many can relate to. Or "tea" instead of "sweet tea". Very recently I have heard of "sweet tea" being served in Missouri. In Texas and Georgia you could order sweet tea and everyone knew what you meant - in St. Louis you put your own damn sugar in:) haha!

Thanks so much and thank you for your help too!


Lady_E profile image

Lady_E 4 years ago from London, UK

Very interesting to read. It's nice to read about other slangs round the world. Great Hub.

PDA - Public Display of Affection. :-)


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi Lady E! Thank you so much! I loved your hubs on the subject...Brian Slater linked it to me:)

Oh - PDA - we used to get suspended for that in high school! I personally never did - I thought it was tacky:) lol.


John Sarkis profile image

John Sarkis 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA

Great hub Housewife. I love philology and languages and find articles like yours interesting - voted as such by the way.

What fascinates me, being of Cuban background is our use of the word "ahora" and "horita." "Ahora," to a Cuban means now and "horita" means later - well, it's the reverse with Mexicans and other Central Americans.

Take care

John


Austinstar profile image

Austinstar 4 years ago from Somewhere in the universe

Hot damn! Cool and zazzie hubbie, dearie. I got buzzed on the slang. Digg it.


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi John Sarkis - thank you very much! I am really interested in those subjects:)

That's pretty cool - I do know Hola is hello in Soanish! I love how all the romance languages can be so close - if you understand one you can sometimes guess the meaning of the unknown. Doesn't always work though - and I could see where one could get into trouble assuming! Like Po Po is slang doe police here where in Soanish - lol - I understand it means something completely different:) haha


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hey Lela - I can digg it! Lol. You are so fly:)

Thanks so much for the groovy comment! Haha!


iamaudraleigh 4 years ago

Kelly, I am impressed! What a history lesson! You did a lot of research to make your hub grand! Very unique too!

The Canadian video was hysterical! I used to be married to a Canadian...weird, eh?

I have to share this and vote it up! Spectacular!!!


sholland10 profile image

sholland10 4 years ago from Southwest Missouri

Kelly, what a well-researched work on slang! I loved it and learned so much from it. I did not know some of those text terms... Hmmm... makes me want to go check some phones. I was a SOPRANOS fan, so I know what "on the mattresses" and "sleep with the fishes" mean. LOL This was one gnarly hub, and I was groovin' to it, Sista!

VOTES AND SHARES!! :-)


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Oh are you serious Audra! You look too young to have had any other marriage! Oh my! Lucky you:)

Thank you SO much - I really appreciate the nice comments. I did quite a bit of research and fact checking...so time consuming but I do enjoy even reading about this stuff so it's all good! LOL


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

haha! Susan! Oh you are cracking me up! "sleep with the fishes" hahahahaha! You are such a criminal! LOL I loved the Sopranos too! Dave and I would make sure we watched every episode together (and they say romance is dead??)!

Thank you so much for reading, commenting, voting and sharing! Wow! You made me laugh on top of it!


fpherj48 profile image

fpherj48 4 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

Kudos to you for this excellent hub, Kelly....lots of research and WELL DONE! No matter how I say it....slang, cant, code, pig latin, jibberish, or sign....it still means VOTED UP!!!!!


Jennifer Essary profile image

Jennifer Essary 4 years ago from Idaho

Beautifully written hub chock full of information. Voted up, interesting, and shared.


tammyswallow profile image

tammyswallow 4 years ago from North Carolina

Awesome hub! Very well written and researched. This hub is slam up "G" (my kids call me that and they say it means Gangsta and that is a good thing). :) Left an annoymous comment as Hubpages is whack. Great job!


Lord De Cross profile image

Lord De Cross 4 years ago

Amazing and surprised! I guess Nelly was right. Is getting hot in here..right on this hot hub! We love history and we have learned a lot. We don't TTUD (talk to us dirty) at this website. Still laughing my arse off(UK) Congrats for your efforts and thorough research!

LORD


Melovy profile image

Melovy 4 years ago from UK

Gosh I’ve learned a lot of new words this morning. I even find ‘What’s up?” a bit confusing because over this side of the pond we use it to mean, “What’s wrong?” And if you say "What’s up?" it generally shows concern, whereas “What’s up with you?” is generally said through gritted teeth and translates as, “Stop behaving that way,” particularly if I’ve just said something you take offence at. So it comes accompanied with, “I never said anything/it wasn’t my fault/etc.)

It’s funny because when you asked for slang words I couldn’t think of one, and now I can think of hundreds! Ruchira’s comment reminded me of a word that in Scotland is used for ‘country bumpkin’: tcheuchter (pronounced as it’s written.) Then we have ‘minging” from Aberdeen, which means disgusting, and “minker,” which is a person who is minging - in other words dirty and scruffy. And people from Aberdeen are themselves known as “Furry booters,” because of the way they speak. (Instead of saying “Whereabouts is St Louis?) they say “Furry boot’s St Louis?”) It’s time I stopped and did my own hub on Aberdonians.

And thanks very much for linking to my hub!


Vellur profile image

Vellur 4 years ago from Dubai

Interesting and entertaining. Enjoyed reading and voted up.


Melis Ann profile image

Melis Ann 4 years ago from Mom On A Health Hunt

I love this info on slang around the world! Socially shared!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi Effer! Thank you so much! I love slang - I just think it's so interesting the way it spreads and how one word gets so mangled it is called damaged! Lol

Pig Latin is interesting isn't it? I emmeberay earning lay it when I was eallyray ungya:) lol


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi Jennifer - thank you and that's too for your input!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hey Tammy - thank you! Or wait...ima start calling you G! hahaha

Thanks for helping me out too - so funny. I knew if I asked moms - they would know it because I try to know what my kids are saying...if I understand what it means it's even better! Haha!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hey Lord! Isn't that funny? TDTM? I had NO idea:) haha! I am going to have to do a little more homework so I really know what the kids are saying. Wow, eh?

Thank you so much - you rock!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Oh Melovy - I was so wondering if you'd be familiar with the Scottish slang? It is so interesting to me. I sometimes read or listen to video from people on your side of the world and I notice I don't understand common words for things! Lol. I guess it's like how some states just have other words than we do.

I was thinking about how the language sounds to the ear too and was so happy to find so many videos available for use! The Bristish boy I can't understand much at all! So weird...it's all English but the accent is foreign to these ears. I'm fascinated by that! Lol

Thanks so much and thanks for helping me too:)))


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hello Vellur and thank you so much! I usually choose topics that I'm super interested in - that way the research isn't so boring:) haha!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

HI Melis Ann - that's so awesome! Thank you so much - for reading, commenting and sharing!


fpherj48 profile image

fpherj48 4 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

Kelly....A-THAY ROBLEM-PAY IS AT-THAY IDS-KAY OF OODAY-TAY.....ATCH-CAY ON UCH-MAY OO-TAY UICKL-QAY....ITTLE-LAY RATS-BAY!!!!


Cardisa profile image

Cardisa 4 years ago from Jamaica

I never learned to speak gypsy or some of our own slang. I was a sheltered child and such "rubbish" as my aunt would put it were not for our class. I do wish I was exposed to more of my own culture because as is, there are times my fiancé has to repeat himself for me to understand what he is saying. I do understand our regular dialect to an extent but not entirely. I was not allowed to speak anything but English in the home I grew up in so I was teased in school for not being able to communicate on that level.


denisemai profile image

denisemai 4 years ago from Idaho

Another great hub! Where I live we have a jockey box instead of a glove compartment, creek is pronounced "crick", we drive "rigs" around town. Great topic and an even better converstation starter. :-)


tugbo200-5 4 years ago

Interesting Hub,also a "Cant" is a square a tree is cut to,then the boards are cut from it.


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

I know just what you are saying Effer! haha! They sure do!!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Oh really Cardisa? Well it sounds like there could be good reason to be learning some of the local slang:) I think it is so interesting to hear - and funny:)

I have to have my husband repeat himself because he mumbles! ha! I am always telling him to stop talking to his feet or the wall:) haha

Thank you so much!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi denisemai - oh that is funny! I have never heard of a jokey box before! It is so funny isn't it - how just from state to state things get changed. Thank you so much for your comments!!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi tugbo100-5 - I didn't know that! Thank you so much - I find it is so true that you learn something every day! lol thanks - you get credit for today! haha!


drbj profile image

drbj 4 years ago from south Florida

I have to give you lotsa 'props' for this excellent slang excursion, Kelly. Your work is 'off the hinges.' BTW, these are compliments, m'luv.


rajan jolly profile image

rajan jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

This is very informative Kelly. Slang has become universal and the order of the day. Some slang words have exactly opposite meanings in 2 different countries. I believe however, slang adds spice to a language.

Very interesting read.

Up all the way.


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

That's great Drbj - here I have heard "that's off the hook"! I love slang - I always try to keep my ears open for the new stuff going around. Gotta know what my kids are saying about me:) lol

Thank you very much!!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hey Rajan - someone else said the same thing too! Wow - I never knew or considered that at all. I will be much more careful though if I am traveling! Whoops - wouldn't want to say the wrong slang thang:) lol

Thank you so much!


Ardie profile image

Ardie 4 years ago from Neverland

Aw DANG - I kept getting these weird text and chat messages from a 'friend' ...they said NIFOC and P911. At the time I just thought he wanted to do something disgusting to his knees because he had a bathroom emergency!!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Ba!hahahahaha! Omg! Ardie you are so funny:) you crack me up! That's good! You get A+ in commentary! Lol


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 4 years ago from St. Louis

Ha! I'd get all up in your grill but I'm sitting NIFOC so why don't you just TDTM and we'll call it even. Nicely done!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Omg! Christoph Reilly! LMAO now don't you live near my hood? You know what the shizzle be! That is so sick! Lol. You ARE all that and a piece of cornbread!


tammyswallow profile image

tammyswallow 4 years ago from North Carolina

Shizle, dizzle! This hub is already climbing its way up into the hottest hubs. Oh, snap!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hey for real? lol I love hearing those words!

My favorite part of this hub was listening to all the different English speakers - and I had a hard time understanding them! lol Thanks for letting me know:)


2patricias profile image

2patricias 4 years ago from Sussex by the Sea

This is interesting!

Your reference to the word "alley" reminded me that in our part of the world, we say "twitten" when most Engish-speakers would say alley.

It is those local variations that make language so interesting.


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi 2patricias - thank you very much! I love slang - I think it's really interesting too. Twitten? Oh that's one I haven't heard of! So funny how words change and evolve...I'll be waiting to see if I hear that here! Lol


Turtlewoman profile image

Turtlewoman 4 years ago from California

Haha that's pretty funny, Kelly. I gotta forward that video to my Canadian brother in law. We are always teasing him. And those teenage slang...I've heard some of them from my cousins...ha! They think they're sooooo clever huh? Now I know what they all mean. Pretty cool hub, voted and shared:-)


Jenny Calender profile image

Jenny Calender 4 years ago

I luv aussie and brit slang :) Neat hub !


Emeraldgreen21 profile image

Emeraldgreen21 4 years ago from South Africa

Brilliant Hub. Voted up and interesting. I spent nearly 3 years in the UK, but I'm finding it nearly impossible to understand the Scots!


ubanichijioke profile image

ubanichijioke 4 years ago from Lagos

Wow! Really interesting!! Very well writtrn ???nd discussed!! Sorry idont ve any slang to share. But ilove this piece!


GLS201 4 years ago

interesting article...and i thought we only spoke slang in urban communities...smh/jk...just like music is a universal language, the many ways to twist & turn common words into new forms of communication amazes me. whether its catchy phrases for poetry, or a private lingo between partners...its fun


barbergirl28 profile image

barbergirl28 4 years ago from Hemet, Ca

Where I am from is famous for saying "Don't you know" I have to say that I don't really use it... much... but Eli does state that when I am around my family or a talk to them a bunch it starts coming back into my vocab.

What a fun hub! All buttons hit across the board!


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

Hi, really funny! lol! after listening to the videos I think I need to take a crash course in all of the slang! The one thing I hate about English slang is what they call Street it drives me mad it goes something like this, 'Ah sorta fink yooo is well cool, innit! so this hub is well cool innit! haha!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hey Turtlewoman - thank you! The Canadian video was my very favorite! That kid was hilarious! I thought he did a terrific job.

Kids these days - are pretty clever. They get smarter and smarter every year! But we just have to keep up with them:) lol. If thatnis at all possible! Thank you also for the votes and shares!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi Jenny Calender - thank you so much! I love the accent (well to me it's an accent:) I can hardly understand them though! Lol. So funny because it's all English - but it's Greek to me!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi Emeraldgreen21 - thank you! I wish I could spend about 3 years in the UK! That's awesome - I'd love to live in every country (spare me a few) for about 7 years each. Experts say the normal family moves about every 7 years...I'd like to move countries! So funny how accents can chez ge everything!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi ubanichijioke - thank you so much! I don't mind if you don't have slang - the comment means so much!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Interesting point you've got GLD201 - it is fun ti share language that only you and your partner understand:) lol. I can think of a few catch phrases my husband and I share...if we go out and he doesn't like the cooking he winks and says "you could live on it" and I know what he means is "tastes like shit but you could survive if you had nothing else to eat" hahaha! If he calls me Betty - he really means another 5 letter word that begins with B! Haha!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi Stacy! Ahh ta da! There you are!

Oh that's funny - my ex mother in law used to start every conversation with me like this "well you know what YOU should do?" ahhhh no but something tells me you're gonna tell me! And chances are I'm not gonna agree! Damn I'm glad I divorced her too! Lol lol


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Nell Rose! You're cracking me up!! Oh my I have heard that on TV! Lol. But I guess I love it because it's new to me:) I think it's so hilarious...and I'm always around young kids so I hear it so much. It's well cool innit! I love it! Sometimes I watch foreign movies just because I love the accents. I was laughing so much when I found so many videos! Well if you need entertainment - check out YouTube videos on slang - it's fun!


DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 4 years ago from Oakley, CA

Very interesting indeed! I've heard more than a few of these, and being of French-Canadian descent on my dad's side, I was familiar with "Toot Sweet" and "Alley," as mispronunciations of the original words. However, the 'boko' I've never heard, but boo-koo, which is closer to correct.

When a cousin of mine was about 3, my aunt, (who was trying to teach her French) told her to say 'thank you' in French for a gift, and she duly thanked the giver, but misconstrued "Merci Beaucoup" into "Horsey Cuckoo!" It has been a family joke ever since--we will frequently say that instead of "thanks," just to be funny.

I got a kick out of the videos, but the Scottish one was difficult to understand because the people who made it forgot that it was the words and not the background music that was important, so you really cannot hear or understand what is being said.

There are also regionalisms, or colloquial terminology used in just one part of the country. My grandfather, for example, from Massachusetts, used to refer to "limber cream," meaning heavy cream that was still liquid, as opposed to whipped cream. I've never heard that usage anywhere outside of MA.

Thanks for a very interesting Hub. Voted up and shared.


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Oh DzyMsLizzy - I was ROTF when I read tour comment! Omg! Horsey Cockoo! Hilarious! I'm going to think of that every time I hear Merci Beaucoup! Lol. I speak a little French - I watch movies so I can keep up a little. It's so much easier to read than hear because of the liason. I wish I knew it better. But when I took it it college - I realized how easily words can be changed or relate. I love languages and stuff like that.

Thanks SO much - you had me rolling:) lol


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 4 years ago from California

Such an interesting hub! I love words and how words become assimilated into language. Thanks!!


ziyena profile image

ziyena 4 years ago from Southern Colorado

This was a fun read. Kudos!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi Audrey! I bet a lot of writers have some sort of fascination with words...maybe one form or another - interesting! Now I am wondering about that..lol Thank you very much!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi ziyena - Thank you so much! I really appreciate the read and the comment:)


barbergirl28 profile image

barbergirl28 4 years ago from Hemet, Ca

Ha ha - sometimes it just works out like that... I am really trying to rack my brains for sayings that I use... but for some reason, until they pop out, I don't even realize what I am saying! :)


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Oh well you know I definitely have THAT problem going on :0 Much worse than you! lol The older I get though - the harder it is to concentrate on everything all at once going on around me. Like the phone will be ringing, dogs barking, doorbell ringing and suddenly someone has a question! I will be like wait! I can't think! lol SAD :(


QudsiaP1 profile image

QudsiaP1 4 years ago

Holy crap my head is spinning with all that slang. :P


Johanna Baker profile image

Johanna Baker 4 years ago from Christchurch, New Zealand

Very interesting but then language is like that...and the whole communication thing constantly evolving...but what is happening to our spelling of words...? Great hub, thank you


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago

I enjoyed your fine Hub about slang. It is very good. Thank you for this pleasure.


wisdom25 profile image

wisdom25 4 years ago from San Tan Valley

Yo Yo Yo! What's really good? lol...Naw I'm just playing. I have to say that I have a couple of favorite hubs by you and I think this one might be my favorite one. You really broke it down and showed how slang started. I don't think any other English teacher could had written this article better. 10 stars for you. Much Love and Respect


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Haha! I bet Qudsia! Hey how the heck are you poet? So sweet to see ya!

I bet you don't hear much of this - but now you'll be in the know I'd you come to St, Louis!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi Johanna Baker - ah good point! Texting - I am horrified by how that seems to be stunting our kids spelling ability! I am really wondering if the old rules and the importance of structure will be another break down in society. I do not like that!

I think there is something to be said for communication being as uniform for the whole group as possible - otherwise we have break downs and those are never good! Thanks for that great point!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi Mr. Watkins - thank you so much! Hey I thought you were on sabbatical? I'm going to have to see what you've been up to! Wonderful to see your avatar!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hey what up Wisdom25? Lol. So funny - naw :) lol. I use that informally a lot dawg:) lol

Thanks so very much - I love your compliment! I optry to only write stuff that makes me laugh but has a learning point. I have such a great time with these tyoe of articles! I'm definitely going to have to check your hubs out - your comment alone makes me laugh and smile:)


mythicalstorm273 profile image

mythicalstorm273 4 years ago

Slang... You know it is so apart of our world now a days that I had to think about words I have heard recently. I still cannot really think of any except the obvious ones. Still it is interesting because I am from what is known as a 'hick' town and so I speak differently than my boyfriend who is from Milwaukee... Although that is not directly slang it covers the slang I know as well... and his family makes fun of me all of the time and sometimes I need to explain what I mean because they do not understand what I was trying to say. That is only a few hours apart as well so I can only imagine how different it could be across country or across the world!


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

That is really interesting that you mention that - I lived in Nebraska and the City of St. Louis, and then we moved out to Jefferson County where the area is much more rural. There were major differences in dialect and what things meant. Like you didn't get a spanking - you got the tar beat out of you! lol (I must have been full of tar!) Fixing to was a common verb...in Nebraska - soda was pop. In St. Louis soda is soda! In NE you got a beating, St. Lou - a spanking, Jeff Co - a licking! lol


dmop profile image

dmop 4 years ago from Cambridge City, IN

I enjoyed this very much. Slang is such a large part of our vocabulary especially in spoken form. I challenge anyone who speaks English and likely any language to go a day with-out using any slang whatsoever $6. Votes across the board, thanks for sharing.


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi dmop! Hey that would be really hard! I know I could not get throug a day using no slang at all - unless you wired my jaws shut. I constantly use it! lol Thank you so much for the votes and share!


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago

You are welcome! What happened was, I took a sabbatical from my sabbatical. :-)


P FOR PEONY profile image

P FOR PEONY 4 years ago

Up! Had a few chuckles reading this. One slang we use is 'chillax' which is essentially a mash up of the words 'Chill' and 'Relax'.


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

You couldn't stay away fro hub could you?! Lol. I'm glad:)


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hey P for Peony! I have hear that one before! Lol. I've got a daughter that's 23 - so she uses a ton of slang - probably how I keep up! Haha! Another good one - thank you for adding it!


kelleyward 4 years ago

I love this hub Kelly! You taught me so many new things. I'm glad to know the internet slang with my boys growing up fast this will come in handy. Voted up, pinned! Kelley


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi Kelley! Isn't slang fun? I love it when I know what the kids are saying when they think they are talking in code:) lol. It usually surprises them when I tell them to slow their roll or get outta my grill! Haha!

Thank you so much!


teddi20 profile image

teddi20 4 years ago

Great hub! Thank you for the text cheat sheet it will come in handy to interpret the texts I receice. The other day my son who is new to texting received a text from a friend that said "IDK." He said what does it mean and I said "I don't know." He then said he was going to text his friend back and ask him. I was rolling on the floor laughing because he thought I was saying I did not know what it meant.


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hi Teddi - that is funny! My daughter has a huge poster on her wall with all the most popular and common text abbreviations...when I am not sure I just run in there and look on her wall. She also knows I know how to figure out what her and her friends are talking about:) LOL Thanks so much for the funny comment!


George Greene Jr. profile image

George Greene Jr. 4 years ago from California PA

If ever a slang word was to have so many translations it would be the "F" word. yes ,it has its bad connotations but in some cases it has meanings that are not even sexually close as in I f---ed that up" or I am so f---ed"for messed and doomed respectfully.

gret hubpost. I am also starting to check out your recipes for my radio show. got some great eats there I must say.


iguidenetwork profile image

iguidenetwork 4 years ago from Austin, TX

This is a wonderful, well-researched hub, I might pick up at least one of the slang words and phrases featured there, just for kicks. Voted up and interesting. :)


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO Author

Hey iguidenetwork - thank you very much! This was a fun one to do!

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