when i am old with you lesson plan

When I Am Old With You

Grade level: Pre-K

Topic: Language and Literacy Development, Social Studies Development, Creative Development, Social and Emotional Development

Short lesson overview:

Grandparents are an important part of our lives. Students will share a wonderful story about a child who loves spending time with his grandfather. After discussing the story and sharing information surrounding memories of their own grandparents, students will draw a picture of their grandparents to help set the mood for an upcoming Grandparent’s Day celebration in the classroom!

Standards Correlation:

LD1d Listens to stories read aloud and shows understanding through body language or by interacting appropriately

LD2b Repeats rhymes, poems, or finger plays

LD4b Engages in conversations with adults and children

LD5b Discusses books or stories read aloud

LD5k Connects information and events in books to real-life experiences

SS1a Begins to understand family structure and roles

SS1d Becomes aware of family and community celebrations and events

SS2a Identifies similarities and differences among people

CD1b Uses materials to create original work for self-expression

CD1c Shares ideas about personal artwork

SE4a Interacts appropriately with peers and familiar adults

Essential Question(s):

What is a grandparent?

Key Skills:

Students will:

· Listen to stories read aloud and discuss them for content

· Repeat the rhyme “Grandma’s Glasses”

· Share experiences through discussion with teachers and peers

· Create artwork to honor grandparents

· Dictate ideas and experience

· Participate with classmates, teachers, and grandparents to celebrate Grandparent’s Day

Materials and Resources:

· Construction paper

· Crayons/markers

· Drawing paper

· Glue

· Scissors

· When I Am Old With You by Angela Johnson, Pictures by David Soman (Orchard Books, 1990)

Introduction (Activating Hook):

Learn the rhyme, Grandma’s Glasses. To incorporate props, have a pair of reading glasses (lenses removed), a woman’s hat and a man’s hat.

Grandma’s Glasses

Here are Grandma’s glasses.

Here is Grandma’s hat.

This is the way she folds her hands

And puts them on her lap.

Here are Grandpa’s glasses.

Here is Grandpa’s hat.

This is the way he folds his arm

And has a little nap.

Step-by-Step Procedures:

1. Now that everyone is sitting with their hands to themselves, read When I Am Old With You.

2. Discuss the different activities that the child does with his grandfather.

3. Encourage students to share special experiences they have had with a grandparent.

4. Provide each child with paper and crayons/markers.

5. Encourage students to create a drawing of their grandparent.

6. Allow students to share information about their grandparent and take dictation

7. Frame these pictures with construction paper and place outside the door prior to a Grandparent’s Day celebration!

Closing/Summarizing/Linking

Host a Grandparent’s Day celebration. Share the homemade cookies and some juice with some very special guests!

Centers Suggestions:

Art

· Fly swatter paintings: provide dishes of paint, fly swatters, and paper. Encourage students to use these materials to create works of art.

· Tractor Tracks: provide dishes of paint, toy tractors, and paper. Encourage students to roll the tractors through the paint and onto the paper.

Blocks

· Fish pond: fishing poles (with magnets instead of hooks), fish cutouts with paperclips attached

· Farm play set

Dramatic Play

· Grandaddy’s House: rocking chairs, stuffed animal dogs, cedar chest with old clothes, photos (real or cut from magazines) in photo albums or picture frames, sun hats, reading glasses (lenses removed)

· Picnic at the lake: picnic basket, plastic dishes, play food, picnic blanket

Library

· Baby dolls and stuffed animals to share books

· Books about families:

o A Visit To Kenya by Mary Packard (Golden Books, 1995)

o Blueberries for Sal by Rober McCloskey (Live Oak Media, 2004)

o Is There Really A Human Race? By Jamie Lee Curtis, Illustrated by Laura Cornell (Joanna Cotler, 2006)

o Just Me and My Dad by Mercer Mayer (Random House Books for Young Readers, 2001)

o Just Me and My Mom by Mercer Mayer (Turtleback, 1990)

o Love You Forever by Robert Munsch, Illustrated by Sheila McGraw (Firefly Books Ltd, 1995)

o Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey (Viking Juvenile, 1941)

o The Bears’ Vacation by Stan and Jan Berenstain (Random House Books for Young Readers, 1968)

o The New Baby by Mercer Mayer (Random House Books for Young Readers, 2001)

o We Eat Dinner in the Bathtub by Angela Shelf Medearis, Illustrated by Jacqueline Rogers (Cartwheel, 1999)

o What Mommies Do Best/What Daddies Do Best by Laura Numeroff, Illustrated by Lynn Munsinger (Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing, 2010)

o Whoever You Are by Mem Fox, Illustrated by Leslie Staub (Sandpiper, 2006)

Math/Manipulative

· Playing cards

Outdoors

· Bubble solution and fly swatters

Science

· River rocks, magnifying glasses, balance scales

· Sensory Table: sand and sea shells

Suggested Background Music:

“All is Love” by Karen O the Kids, Where the Wild Things Are CD (2009)

“Amy” by Linda Purdy, Pirates & Cowboys CD (2002)

“Baby Mine” by Bette Midler, Beaches CD (1988)

“Brahms Lullaby” by Brent Lewis, Rhythm Basket CD (2000)

“Bubble Trouble” by Mr. Billy, Hello, My Name is Mr. Billy CD (2002)

“’Cause We’re Cousins” by Sarah Lee Guthrie & Family, Go Waggaloo CD (2009)

“We Are Family” by Alvin and the Chipmunks, Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel CD (2009)

“Welcome” by Phil Collins, Brother Bear CD (2003)

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