10 Startling Facts About Ward Bond That Will Shock You

Ward Bond dressed up
Ward Bond dressed up

We loved him

in "Sargent York," "The Jim L. Sullivan Story," and his best work: "Wagon Train," with a host of Hollywood's finest actors. Bond was in real-life as he was in most of his roles--stubborn, short-tempered, but so wise he was seldom led into the wrong pathway.

Personally, I loved Ward Bond in no matter what role he played. I guess my favorite role he played was his role in "Wagon Train," and his constant frustration with the cook, "Charlie Wooster." Bond gave this show and any production "that" touch that was needed to give it that special image.

Sadly, Ward Bond was human. And not made of granite. I found out recently that there were

10 Starting Facts About Ward Bond That Will Shock You

Bond, left, as John L. Sullivan and Erroll Flynn as Gentleman Jim Corbett starred in one of Bond's best films about the life of John L. Sullivan
Bond, left, as John L. Sullivan and Erroll Flynn as Gentleman Jim Corbett starred in one of Bond's best films about the life of John L. Sullivan

Ward Bond

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  • Wardell Edwin "Ward" Bond (April 9, 1903 – November 5, 1960)[1] was an American film actor whose rugged appearance and easy going charm were featured in over 200 films and the television series Wagon Train. He is remembered for his roles as Bert in It's a Wonderful Life (1946) and Captain Clayton in The Searchers (1956), among many others.

Early life[edit]

  • Bond was born in Benkelman, Nebraska, a small town located in the southwestern corner of Nebraska near the Kansas and Colorado borders. The Bond family, John W., Mabel L., and sister Bernice, lived in Benkelman until 1919 when they moved to Denver. Ward graduated from East High School in Denver.
  • Bond attended the University of Southern California and played football on the same team as future USC coach Jess Hill.[2] At 6'2" and 195 pounds, Bond was a starting lineman on USC's first national championship team in 1928.
  • Bond and John Wayne, who as Marion Robert Morrison had played tackle for USC in 1926 before an injury ended his career,[3] became lifelong friends and colleagues. Bond, Wayne and the entire Southern Cal team were hired to appear in Salute (1929), a football film starring George O'Brien and directed by John Ford. During the filming of this movie Bond and Wayne befriended Ford, and appeared in many of Ford's later films.

Bond in one of his military films
Bond in one of his military films
 Ward Bond was one of Alvin York's drinking buddies in the icon film,  "Sargent York," with Gary Cooper
Ward Bond was one of Alvin York's drinking buddies in the icon film, "Sargent York," with Gary Cooper
Bond and Humphrey Bogart in one of Bogie's successful films
Bond and Humphrey Bogart in one of Bogie's successful films

Please keep on open mind

1.) Ward Bond, the Hollywood Icon

was never able to speak Chinese although it was rumored that he took Chinese lessons in secret to maintain is tough, manly-image.

2.) On one shooting of Wagon Train

Ward Bond went missing, but a crew member found him hidden behind a wagon chowing-down on a homemade cupcake. The origin of who made the said cupcake was never known.

3.) As a sport and past-time

Ward Bond loved to go with friends and spend the weekend racing mules that Bond had purchased from a secret source just for this purpose. Bond loved mules and provided well for the 19 mules he owned.

4.) Bond's co-stars

Had worlds of respect for Bond's acting talents, but some were heard whispering about his lack of talent for whistling popular tunes in that day and time.

5.) Ward Bond's iron-man's demeanor

Was always in the forefront, but when Bond and his crew on the film he was shooting or the television, "wagon Train," were having a lunch break, people noticed that Bond ate with such a delicate set of manners that most of the female actresses would leave the table in tears.

6.) Bond wore a gun

on "Wagon Train," to give viewers the mindset of his western knowledge and background, but the truth was, Ward Bond was a terrible shot with a pistol and a rifle. Some times when he had to shoot his firearm during the filming of "Wagon Train," he would shoot then throw his pistol to the ground covering his ears.

7.) Ward Bond: Wrestler

Bond's six-foot frame and him being in great physical shape, made him a prime candidate for getting involved with the early entertainment venue of television wrestling. It was found-out that a powerful wrestling promoter offered Bond a lucrative contract and a scary wrestling name, "The Loner," if he would wrestle for the promoter and let it leak-out that "The Loner" was Hollywood star, Ward Bond.

8.) One of Ward Bond's pet peeves

was the many high schools in the Hollywood area who would pursue him to come to their schools to give the students a motivational talk about their future after graduation.

9.) Bond had some failures

in his life in Hollywood. One failure Bond faced was he was terrible in the flower garden when it pertained to raising roses which was his favorite flower.

10.) Ward Bond's secret dream

was uncovered as that of being a trained ballet dancer performing famous ballets from coast-to-coast and around the world. Bond commented once, "If it were not for being scorned in public, I would leave acting today and try-out for the ballet."

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Hail to the classic western

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Comments 12 comments

Kathleen Kerswig 20 months ago

Thanks for sharing this information about Ward Bond. He looks familiar to me but I never knew his name. I love watching old movies from the 1940s and 50's. I think it's because my dad and I used to watch them together when I was growing up. Dad still watches them and so do I and once in a while we compare notes. ;) Good job with this hub!


William F. Torpey profile image

William F. Torpey 20 months ago from South Valley Stream, N.Y.

Ward Bond was always a great addition to any movie he was in -- and "Wagon Train" was surely one of his best. In addition to roles he played in dozens of movies, I particularly liked him in "Sergeant York" and "Gentleman Jim" (where he played John L. Sullivan) and when in Bing Crosby's "Riding High." Unfortunately, you'd have to be an oldtimer (like me) to have seen many of his movies (That's when movies were really made well.)


kenneth avery profile image

kenneth avery 20 months ago from Hamilton, Alabama Author

William F. Torpey,

You are not an old timer. You are experienced in real life. I agree with your synopsis of Ward Bond. Besides Wagon Train, the John L. Sullivan story was my favorite. Especially in the clip on this story. Two real men now meeting. One with grace in loss and the other shaken with awkwardness on how to be a winner.

Wish they made these films in 2015.

Come back soon and have a great day.


kenneth avery profile image

kenneth avery 20 months ago from Hamilton, Alabama Author

My Dear Kathleen,

Thank you for your sweet comment. I appreciate you very much.

My dad and I used to watch those old films, mostly westerns. I still love those. But Ward Bond will always be "the man."

Have a great day. Thank you for making mine.


RoadMonkey profile image

RoadMonkey 20 months ago

I used to love watch ing Wagon Train. As a child, it was on on a Saturday night. We all got bathed in a tin bath in front of the fire and then all 5 of us children sat on the sofa, clean in our nightclothes in front of the fire, with our weekly bar of chocolate, watching wagon train, or one of the other cowboy films. I can still sing the theme song.


kenneth avery profile image

kenneth avery 20 months ago from Hamilton, Alabama Author

RoadMonkey,

Thanks for painting such a nice scene with your comment. I loved it. Especially the line about "we all got bathed in a tin bath in front of the fire . . ." Wonderful.

I would LOVE for YOU to Follow me. Honest.

You would be my ONLY RoadMonkey. I will be looking for you.


annart profile image

annart 20 months ago from SW England

I'd totally forgotten about 'Wagon Train' but I did enjoy it. The actor's name rang a bell but I wouldn't have recalled the face if you hadn't given us all this info. Interesting and amusing. It's good to remember these actors who entertained us all so well and who were respected by their peers.

Ann


kenneth avery profile image

kenneth avery 20 months ago from Hamilton, Alabama Author

Hello, annart,

I thank God that YOU are in my life as my friend and follower. Thanks for always cheering me up. I had my taxes done this evening and an hour later, the wind was taken from my sails.

I could not believe how shrewd the I.R.S. really is.

But that's another story.

Come back anytime.


annart profile image

annart 20 months ago from SW England

Ours is HMRC (Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs); just as bad!


kenneth avery profile image

kenneth avery 20 months ago from Hamilton, Alabama Author

annart,

I never realized that there were other agencies as rough as the I.R.S. except the C.I.A.

I know that it's going to be awhile before I get over this shock.

Thank you for understanding, my Dear Friend.

Happy Easter


annart profile image

annart 20 months ago from SW England

Happy Easter to you too, Kenneth.

Ann


kenneth avery profile image

kenneth avery 20 months ago from Hamilton, Alabama Author

Dear annart,

Thank you so much. That is very sweet of you to say this.

You are a Dear friend, ann.

God bless you with peace and happiness.

Kenneth

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