All Creatures of Our God and King — Piano Solo by Daniel Carter

"Saint Francis of Assisi" by Jusepe de Ribera

The Words to the Hymn

St. Francis of Assisi penned the words for this hymn over 800 years ago. The most popular translation used today is by William H. Draper. His translation is below.

All creatures of our God and King,
Lift up your voice and with us sing,
Alleluia! Alleluia!
Thou burning sun with golden beam,
Thou silver moon with softer gleam,
Alleluia! Alleluia!
Alleluia! Oh, praise him! Alleluia!

Thou rushing wind that art so strong,
Ye clouds that sail in heav'n along,
Alleluia! Alleluia!
Thou rising morn, in praise rejoice;
Ye light of evening, find a voice,
Alleluia! Alleluia!
Alleluia! Oh, praise him! Alleluia!

Thou flowing water pure and clear,
Make music for thy Lord to hear,
Alleluia! Alleluia!
Thou fire so masterful and bright,
That gives to man both warmth and light
Alleluia! Alleluia!
Alleluia! Oh, praise him! Alleluia!

Dear Mother Earth, who day by day
Unfoldest blessings on our way,
Alleluia! Alleluia!
The flowers and fruit that in thee grow,
Let them his glory also show,
Alleluia! Alleluia!
Alleluia! Oh, praise him! Alleluia!

Words by St. Francis of Assisi, (1182–1226), translated by William H. Draper, (1855–1933)
Music from Geistliche Kirchengesänge, Koln, 1623.

Piano Solo by Daniel Carter

Available as a single piano solo.

Available as a single piano solo.
Available as a single piano solo. | Source

About Saint Francis of Assisi

Saint Francis of Assisi was one of seven children born to a rich cloth merchant. In his early life, he loved all the pleasures of his wealth and social standing. He was noted for his bright clothing, rich friends, street brawls and by several accounts, his playboy life style.

However that all changed when he was selling his father's cloths in a marketplace, and while he was in the middle of a large transaction, a beggar asked him for alms. At the conclusion of the business deal, Francis abandoned his work and pursued the beggar, and upon finding him, gave him all that he had in his pockets. His friends and father mocked and rebuked him, calling his actions foolishness.

Francis joined the military and was taken captive for a year. It is believed that his spiritual conversion was completed during this time. After his conversion, his former companions chided and mocked him, asking him if he planned to marry, to which he answered, "yes, a fairer bride than any of you have ever seen," meaning his "lady poverty."

Francis endured his father's threats and beatings, and even legal actions taken by the Catholic church. Francis renounced his father and gave up all his inheritance and even the clothes he received from his father to devote his life to the ministry.

During his ministry, Francis penned the immortal words to this hymn.

William H. Draper
William H. Draper

About the Translator, William H. Draper

William H. Draper, who translated "All Creatures of Our God and King" to English, was born De­cem­ber 19, 1855, Ken­il­worth, War­wick­shire, Eng­land. He died Au­gust 9, 1933, Clif­ton, Bris­tol, Eng­land.

Draper was ed­u­cat­ed at Ke­ble Coll­ege, Ox­ford (BA in honors, MA 1880). He was or­dained to the ministry in 1880. He held posts as Cur­ate of St. Ma­ry’s, Shrews­bu­ry; Vi­car of Al­fre­ton; Vic­ar of the Ab­bey Church, Shrews­bu­ry; Rec­tor of Adel, York­shire (1899-1919); Mas­ter of the Tem­ple, Lon­don (1919–30); and Vi­car of Ax­bridge, Som­er­set. Along with translating "All Creatures of our God and King," his works in­clude, "The Victoria Book of Hymns" (1897), "Hymns for Ho­ly Week" (Lon­don: H. Frowde, 1898), "A Memorial Service for Them That Are Fall­en Asleep in Christ" (Lon­don: H. Frowde, 1898), "The Way of the Cross" (Ox­ford, Eng­land: A. R. Mow­bray & Co.)

Draper al­so con­trib­ut­ed about 60 hymns al­to­ge­ther.

There are other translations of St. Francis' words. You can find some of them by doing an internet search.

The vocal solos is included in the popular collection.
The vocal solos is included in the popular collection.

Because of the popularity of this arrangement I was asked by singer friends if I would accompany them singing it, using my arrangement. As a result a vocal solo version is available in Hymns for Solo Voice II.

The arrangement is also included in this collection of piano solos.
The arrangement is also included in this collection of piano solos.

Additionally, the piano solo version is included in a collection with other favorite piano solos, Hymns for Keyboard Performers, 2.

More by this Author


Comments 7 comments

Aya Katz profile image

Aya Katz 6 years ago from The Ozarks

Dan, it's a beautiful arrangement. Bow and I enjoyed watching the video. He was especially drawn to the images of babies.


SomewayOuttaHere profile image

SomewayOuttaHere 6 years ago from TheGreatGigInTheSky

another nice one...thank you again!


Daniel Carter profile image

Daniel Carter 6 years ago from Western US Author

Thanks so much, Aya and Someway...

So nice of you to stop by. I'm enjoying this process, but is sure is labor intensive. But I do like the results!


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 6 years ago from South Africa

Great hub! Beautiful music! Interesting info about Francis of Assisi. Truly appreciated. Voted up!


Daniel Carter profile image

Daniel Carter 6 years ago from Western US Author

Thanks, Martie!


Hello, hello, profile image

Hello, hello, 6 years ago from London, UK

Awesome and wonderful. Thank you.


KAH 2 years ago

This is wonderful and so uplifting!

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