Jazz Vibe Alive! Jamming To Jazz Golden Classical Funk-Jazz & Rare Grooves -- Volume II

Master Blasting Rare, Jazzy Funky And Vibey Grooves

Digging The Best Funky, Soulful Riffs In The Mix
Digging The Best Funky, Soulful Riffs In The Mix | Source

No More "Is Jazz Dead"

We are informed by Alexander Brown that:

For 2013, I hope not to hear any "jazz is dead" arguments. The past few years have been rife with them, from systemic looks at the decline of the popularity to creative attempts at rebranding. None of the discussions really solve anything, but serve a human need to conflate controversy with enlightened entertainment or debate. Jazz isn't dead, so much as it's grown up.

No one would consider the over-reaching classification of classical music dead. We are far from the days when composers could overwhelm their fans with Lisztomania. People aren't clamoring to claim "I was there when" in regard to Alex Ross' New Yorker columns. At the same time, a city isn't considered a city without its own symphony hall or opera house.

Jazz is about at that level of respectability, with a few caveats. Only a handful of cities really take pride in their jazz districts and club. There are also a number of jazz artists who will proudly proclaim that their stage performance drops the panties or pants. But make no mistake, jazz is music mostly aimed at grown folks, and that's probably a good thing.

Does anyone really want the current end-all be-all targeted music audience, teens and the twenty-somethings, be the main focus of this music? That audience, while seemingly vast and flushed with a nearly inexhaustible amount of capital for entertainment, is also fickle with their loyalties. The people who fell in love with 'N Sync a decade and a half ago aren't buying Justin Timberlake's The 20/20 Experience with the same aplomb.

Nothing stays massively popular forever. No one talks about theatre being dead, despite the fact film and television outstrip its popularity many times over. People still buy private journals and scrapbooks, even though starting a Facebook or Pinterest account are the norm and downright required for some professions.

One of the wonders of the 21 century is the fact that any crowd can be an "in crowd." Yes, jazz is subsidized by academia, taxpayers, or foundations. But maybe we shouldn't take it as a sign of an art form's demise but rather its evolution and acknowledgement into something more than the prelude to a good lay. Not that jazz isn't still that.

The potential of the genre lies not in its ability to appeal to all comers, but to its capacity to encapsulate a maturity of a lifetime. Leave all the confusing thoughts and feelings of unfocused youth to hip-hop and pop music, eventually they’ll have to grow up, too. And growth isn’t death, just change, and things that change don’t die. And jazz has certainly changed, and if you can’t see how that’s a good thing maybe you have some growing up to do.

JazzAlive...

The presentation made below is solely for entertainment purposes, intention and goals. I am a Jazz appreciator and collector. Over the Years I have listened to Jazz in all its specific genres, and still do today. In this Hub I only want to present Jazz musicians whose composition remain etched in my musical soul.

By creating this Hub, I do not claim to be a Jazz anything, but appreciator of the music. As I have listened over time to jazz, and there are tracks composed by certain artist which rock me to the core. So that, this Hub is for people who want to listen to some real-Funky Jazz in a long drawn-up Hub, and hope you keep on coming back, or use it for special occasion for ones invited friends and situations like that get the bodies swinging and dancing continuously. Jazz as a musical genre has a lot of music that one can just to, present and set in way that it become continuous, fun and tightly jazzing and jamming hard listening experience. This is a Hub for Those who love Jazz Funk...

Throughout the years different genres came and left the scene just as soon as they appeared. In this case we can speak about "Disco" and the present musical craze called "Hip-Hop". But throughout the fame and rise of these two genres, Jazz has been morphing and adapting to the styles like Soul, Funk, Some Disco, and Rap. What I am saying is that jazz has never been stagnant, and in its changing, it has maintained its classical approach, and was one with the new changes that were taking place in the music scene.

It is true that those who were the "Appreciators" of Jazz, mostly have passed-on. But it is also true, if one reads the comments on YouTube on the Jazz posts there, that the younger generations, because most of the music they have been listening to was "Sampled" from" jazz that's already there, will always comment that they were sent to the video by so-and also; and it turns out that they were listening to the sampled form, and someone told to go and listen to the original track and gave them the artist name and the song.

The new technologies, too, are enabling and resuscitating jazz in a myriad ways. It is a very fortunate thing that YouTube came around, and in it we can find most of the music that has been appreciated from the 1900, to date. This is a very good thing(From YouTube) because it gave a lease on life to jazz.

Today, despite what many say, there is a new life that has been injected into Jazz. It is a form that has come a long way to be where we are in the Technological Age. Jazz has gone viral like everything else, and it has always been an international genre, and it is more so now because it is readily and easily accessible to all those who look for it and want to listen to it.

This Hub is going to attempt to cover as much ground, although I will not go too deeply into the classical form of Jazz, it will try to concentrate on those Funky Jazz sounds that have come down the many generations, to those we are listening to and see it in today's world. Many musicians have since passed, but that does not mean that they left us without anything to hold on to.

Some of the tunes were way-ahead of their times, and still are fresh when one listeners to the. In most cases, in this Hub, I have tried to give a short Bio of the artists, and in some cases added my own historical interaction in being an "appreciator " of the Jazz Music. Towards the end, I will give our various tunes, just so that I can recap the music of jazz without much interruption of bios or my comments.

I hope I will have been able to create a Hub that will preserve the music right into the next millennium, 3,000 AD. I know, that even then, Jazz will be holding its own, no matter what genres pop-up into the musical scene of the future.

Jazz Will And still remains Alive.

Hubert Laws And grant Green

Hubert Laws:  is an American flutist and saxophonist with a career spanning over 40 years in jazz, classical, and other music genres. Alongside Herbie Mann, Laws is probably the most recognized and respected jazz flutist. Laws is one of the few class
Hubert Laws: is an American flutist and saxophonist with a career spanning over 40 years in jazz, classical, and other music genres. Alongside Herbie Mann, Laws is probably the most recognized and respected jazz flutist. Laws is one of the few class | Source
Grant Green: Many of Grant's recordings were not released during his lifetime. These include McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones (also part of the Solid group) performing on Matador (also recorded in 1964), and several albums with pianist Sonny Clark. In 196
Grant Green: Many of Grant's recordings were not released during his lifetime. These include McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones (also part of the Solid group) performing on Matador (also recorded in 1964), and several albums with pianist Sonny Clark. In 196 | Source

Grant Green & Hubert Laws - "Main Attraction"

The Opening Salvo - Jazz In The Viral Soup

Whenever I am listening to music, the least I can for the artist is to show his face, plus give a short-bio on them But the Hub is mostly for listening, and I try to keep the reading to a minimum, But the bit I post, helps the listener to read about the artist, see their photo, and chose one track that keeps me upbeat and listening to each and every note and instruments.

I open with the music of Grant Green because I think before the storm, the hard hitting tunes, it is appropriate, soulful and very well rounded as a start of the Main Events of the many 'Main Attractions' that are to follow from various artists that I find their music edifying and spiritually/soul satisfying in their Jazz/Funky vibe. I think I am talking as the music progresses about how it affects they way I write, and I am also hopeful that the Jazz/Funk love will acknowledge that some of the tracks will be long… Well, that too was to keep the spirit engaged and tied up so that the next piece, will keep on adding up to the crescendo of Funk/Jazz below.

I also play one track from Grant Green and one from Hubert Laws. I selected their well-known tunes because today the younger generation no longer listens to this music. I hope in time they will come across such Hubs and listen to the music and see/hear the beauty of the compositions that are always and stay evergreen.

I selected for this listening section The well-known and very sensuously funky jam of Hubert Laws's "Miss Thing," and with it, I selected Grant Green's "Ain't It funky Now".. Which I think it is beginning to be having listened to Green's Jazz funk

Hubert Laws Quintet - Land of Passion

Grant Green - Ain't It Funky Now

Gene "Jug" Ammons

Eugene “Jug” Ammons (April 14, 1925 - August 6, 1974) was an American jazz tenor saxophone player, and the son of boogie-woogie pianist Albert Ammons. Ammons began to gain recognition when he went on the road with trumpeter King Kolax band in 1943, a
Eugene “Jug” Ammons (April 14, 1925 - August 6, 1974) was an American jazz tenor saxophone player, and the son of boogie-woogie pianist Albert Ammons. Ammons began to gain recognition when he went on the road with trumpeter King Kolax band in 1943, a | Source

Gene Ammons - "Hittin' the Jug"

Gene Ammons - Lady Mama (1972)

An Appreciation: Gene Ammons (1925-1974)

Gene Ammons is a jazz saxophonist who has been regularly finding his way into my CD player for 20 years. His very expressive style displayed a high technical mastery of the instrument while remaining true to his soul and R&B connections.

Born in 1925 in Chicago, Gene “Jug” Ammons was the son of renowned boogie-woogie pianist Albert Ammons. His talent was apparent as early as high school and at 18 he joined the King Kolax Band. A year later he moved over to Billy Eckstine’s band and started to really establish himself as a young talent. It was in Eckstine’s band that he took the chair next to Charlie Parker and Lester Young. Reflect on that for a moment — that was just an incredible line up of talent across those three chairs! Young (along with Ben Webster) was the biggest influences on Ammons.

It was Eckstine himself who bestowed the nickname “Jug” on Ammons. Eckstine had ordered straw hats for the orchestra and they couldn’t find one that fit Gene’s giant noggin. He good-naturedly accepted the name but it’s good to note that in later years (due to his talent) he was also known as “The Boss”. (Sorry Bruce.)

Eckstine went on to a solo career and Ammons formed his first group as leader employing Miles Davis and Sonny Stitt. Chicago was THE jazz scene after the war. As I may have mentioned in the past, keep in mind that the returning GI’s had gotten a taste of jazz in Europe and were very open to the new sounds that were evolving past the “Big Band” sound that dominated the war years.

In ’49 Ammons briefly replaced Stan Getz in Woody Hermann’s band but soon went on to a duet group with Sonny Stitt. The 1950′s were Gene’s most prolific period and his discography just grows.

Gene wasn’t immune to the evolution towards bebop (remember he had played with Parker and Young) and he was more than capable of handling the fast changes and technical skills needed for bebop but Gene also remained very true to his expressive jazz roots and also stayed current with the new soul and R&B sounds that were coming out of Chicago in the late ’50′s and early ’60′s.

In many ways, Ammons has been an under-appreciated talent in the history of jazz. He is certainly not the household name that Coltrane, Parker, or Miles became yet on some levels he was just as good. He died at the age of 49 of cancer and left a huge legacy of music.

For the new listener I would recommend sticking to the Greatest Hits CD that catalogs his work of ”The Fifties” and for a little more depth, the three-volume Greatest Hits – Jug Retrospective – release.

He remains a master at capturing the ear — and heart – with emotional ballads that make you stop and listen. This is music for a quite evening at home. Low lights, a favorite drink, a lush spectrum of sound. It’s all there.

Enjoy…

Feeling Good - Gene Ammons

Gene Ammons - "Play Me"

Ben Webster

Ben Webster
Ben Webster | Source

Ben Webster - Hymn To Freedom

Ben Webster - Blue Light

Ben Webster

Benjamin Francis Webster (Kansas City, Missouri, USA, March 27, 1909 – Amsterdam, The Netherlands, September 20, 1973) was an influential American jazz tenor saxophonist.

Ben Webster, a.k.a. “The Brute” or “Frog," was considered one of the three most important “swing tenors” along with Coleman Hawkins (his main influence) and Lester Young. Known affectionately as “The Brute," he had a tough, raspy, and brutal tone on stomps (with his own distinctive growls), yet on ballads he played with warmth and sentiment. Stylistically he was also indebted to alto star Johnny Hodges, who, he said, taught him to play his instrument.

Webster learned to play piano and violin at an early age, before learning to play the saxophone. Once Budd Johnson showed him some basics on the saxophone, Webster began to play that instrument in the Young Family Band (which at the time included Lester Young). Webster spent time with quite a few orchestras in the 1930s (including Andy Kirk, Fletcher Henderson in 1934,Benny Carter, Willie Bryant, Cab Calloway, and the short-lived Teddy Wilson big band).

In 1940 Ben Webster became the first major tenor soloist of Duke Ellington’s orchestra. During the next three years he was on many famous recordings, including “Cottontail” and “All Too Soon.” After three productive years of playing with Ellington, Webster left the band in an angry altercation, during which he cut up one of Ellington’s suits. After leaving Ellington in 1943, Webster worked on 52nd Street in New York City; recorded frequently as both a leader and a sideman; had short periods with Raymond Scott, John Kirby, and Sidd Catlett; and toured with Jazz At The Philharmonic during several seasons in the 1950s.

Oscar Peterson - Ben Webster Meets Oscar Peterson .1959 . ( Full Album)

Charlie Parker

Blues - Charlie Parker
Blues - Charlie Parker | Source

Charlie Parker -Jam Sessiom - Funky Blues

Charlie Parker's "Funky Blues" on hit album Titled "Jam Session

Charlie "Bird" Parker was a peerless musician who needs no further introduction. Despite his vast discography, there are few good-sounding recordings where the majority of the tunes run any more than 5 minutes in length. Jam Sessions is one of the notable exceptions. Backed by an all-star band (including such giants as Johnny Hodges, Ben Webster, Benny Carter, and Oscar Peterson), Parker stretches with leisurely exuberance across lengthy jams (every track is over 13 minutes).

The assembled talent really come together and hit their stride on the album's two blues numbers. "Jam Blues" kicks off the record in an up-tempo, surging forward with one inspired solo after another, including a genius guitar solo by the great Barney Kessel, who swings with an almost rockabilly edge.

Trumpeter Charlie Shavers and saxophonist Flip Phillips deserve much greater acknowledgment after their work on these sessions. "Funky Blues" is the closest we can come to actually seeing the Bird soar in an after-hours jam session. This easy-paced blues unfolds deliciously, with each solo building on top of the preceding one, as these musicians converge on the bluesy heart of their playing. Benny Carter's alto rarely sounded sweeter, and Ben Webster's breathy tenor deserves honors.

The album's two ballads balance out the program, and are of fine quality, if not a little too pretty. But the real reason that you must hear this recording is to experience the swinging sensation of its soulful blues.

Tracks

1. Jam Blues (14:42)

2. What Is This Thing Called Love? (15:51)

3. Ballad Medley (17:23)

4. Funky Blues (13:27)

Players

Charlie "Bird" Parker: Alto Sax

Johnny Hodges: Alto Sax

Benny Carter: Alto Sax

Ben Webster: Tenor Sax

Flip Phillips: Tenor sax

Charlie Shavers: Trumpet

Barney Kessel: Guitar

Oscar Peterson: Piano

Ray Brown: Bass

J.C. Heard: Drums

This performance highlights the difference between Parker's form of expression on the blues in contrast to the approaches that came before him. I am indebted to saxophone master Von Freeman for initially pointing out these observations.

Obviously this recording was altered to highlight the differences between these players, as Hodges and Carter were the two major alto saxophone stylists during the era before Parker arrived on the scene. Based on the jump in tempo after Bird's statement, you can hear that the original recording was edited so that Benny Carter's statement would follow Bird's. Clearly, this was not how it was originally recorded.

The two older alto saxophonists are East Coast players; Hodges from Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Carter from New York City. During that time, a player's musical style seemed to reflect the region of the country they came from; regional differences seemed more pronounced than they are today. Of course, these differences had little to do with the level of musicianship, but they did seem to show up in some of the stylistic tendencies of the players. This is not at all meant as a critique. I only wish to point out that each of these players had different approaches to the Blues idiom, and some of that was a reflection of which area of the country they came from.

This first appearance of more complex voice-leading occurs at the beginning of what's called the turnback(2:28), a pivot area in the seventh through eighth measures that progresses from the subdominant through the tonic and dominant areas, then back towards the subdominant, where Bird's spontaneous melody perfectly follows Ray Brown's bassline.

The cadential target on the upbeat of the end middle of this phrase (2:30) rhymes with the target upbeat cadence at the end (2:34) via the adroit use of contour and paraphrase. The next phrase flips the cadential targets from upbeat to downbeat, while simultaneously slightly lengthening the cadences, in a motion leading to the tonic. However, immediately upon touching the tonic, Bird progresses to the subdominant. This chorus ends with a blues-tinged afterthought.

The second chorus begins with a miniature version of a classic blues form, against the background chorus of the other horns functioning as the congregation to Bird's preaching. The opening phrase is repeated three times in an I don't believe ya heard me form, with the middle phrase as the darker lunar expression (i.e., subdominant).

After this bluesy statement, beginning in the fourth measure, Bird, in a whispering statement that feels like an explanation, shifts gears into a level of sophistication rarely heard in the blues of this time. In the sixth measure (3:07), Parker literally falls out of this mode of playing, through an alternate tonal path in the form of a descending semi-pentatonic figure, again melodically shadowing Brown's bass line with sophisticated rising and falling voice-leading in the crucial pivoting area of seventh and eighth measures, hitting every passing tonality while still maintaining his melodic emphasis.

Moving into the tenth measure (3:19), Parker again shifts into the overdrive, ascending as a light color, squeezing out the top of the line, descending using shifting darker hues, then moving towards the subdominant before doubling back on a darker dominant path towards the tonic. Parker's innate sense of balance was incredible, as is clearly demonstrated at the end of this solo.

Whereas most players today with his level of technique would feel a need to follow the harmony explicitly, Bird is able to suggest the voice-lead just with the shape of his pentatonic and diatonic line, using a well developed sense of just where to rhythmically place the tones that lead by proximity to the target pitches that express the passing tonalities. With Parker it is the melodic contour and path which rules supreme, not the tones in a particular chord. The difference is subtle.

Finally, I would like to state that I think of these slow versions of the blues as examples of secular rituals. In much West African music there is this constant interplay of 3 communing with 2, an intimate marriage of the ternary feel (called perfect meter in medieval times because it was related to the Trinity) and the duple feel (imperfect meter). The intervals of the Perfect Fifth and Perfect Fourth were called perfect for this same reason, as they were associated with the number 3, considered perfect since ancient times.

This was also true in early European music. For example, the metered sections of some Notre Dame organum as well as some of the secular music of medieval times was typically governed by rhythmic modes which were all expressed in triple meter to symbolize the Trinity. So in some ways, this connects to what Dizzy called Parker's Sanctified Rhythms.

If you listen carefully to Parker's opening phrase, it is almost completely in a kind of ternary feel, and this is true of the most blues-inflected parts of his performance.(Reviewer: Steve Coleman)

Jarold Mabern

Harold Mabern
Harold Mabern | Source

Harold Mabern

Harold Mabern (born March 20, 1936 in Memphis, Tennessee) is a hard bop and soul jazz pianist.

Early in his career, Mabern played in Chicago with Walter Perkins’ MJT + 3 in the late 1950s[1] before moving to New York in 1959. Mabern has worked with Jimmy Forrest, Lionel Hampton, the Jazztet (1961-1962), Donald Byrd, Miles Davis (1963), J. J. Johnson (1963-1965), Lee Morgan (1965), Hank Mobley (1965), Sonny Rollins, Freddie Hubbard, Wes Montgomery, Joe Williams (1966-1967), and Sarah Vaughan. In more recent years, he has recorded extensively with his former William Paterson University student, the tenor saxophonist Eric Alexander.(1)

He performed in a video recorded session with Wes Montgomery in 1965 that is currently available on DVD as Wes Montgomery Live in ‘65.

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Mabern led four albums for Prestige Records, performed with Lee Morgan, and recorded with Stanley Cowell’s Piano Choir. Harold Mabern has recorded as a leader for DIW/Columbia and Sackville and toured with the Contemporary Piano Ensemble (1993-1995).

A longtime faculty member at William Paterson University, Mabern is a frequent instructor at the Stanford Jazz Workshop.

Harold Mabern - "Rakin' and Scrapin'"...

Johnny 'Hammond' Smith

Johnny "Hammond" Smith
Johnny "Hammond" Smith | Source

Johnny Hammond - It's Too Late - 1971 [Soul-Jazz]

Star Borne - Johnny Hammond Smith

Jonhhy "Hammond" Smith

When Johnny Hammond signed with Milestone Records in the summer of 1975, he was reuniting himself with his old record catalog. Except for the years 1971-75, Hammond recorded exclusively for Prestige and Riverside Records, under his real name, Johnny Smith. Johnny’s nickname was Hammond, named after the instrument he helped to popularize—the Hammond organ. There are currently eight albums by Johnny in the Prestige catalog.

“I dropped the Smith—not because I didn’t like the name, but because I got tired of being confused with Jimmy Smith. We’re both organists, and we’ve both made our mark on the music. It’s just that Johnny is too close to Jimmy—if you get what I mean!” Hammond smiles.

It should be stated that Hammond does not concentrate entirely on the organ. The truth is that Hammond is a total keyboard player. A good listen to Forever Taurus will afford one with a healthy dose of Hammond’s talents on the electric piano and the synthesizer.

Born John Robert Smith in Louisville, Kentucky, December 16, 1933, he has a mildly musical background: “My mother sang in the choir, my sister and others in the family were musical, but I’m the only one who became a professional.”

He studied piano at a local music school and—more valuably, he says—with a private teacher, Elizabeth Minnis.

“My influences were Charlie Parker, Dizzy, Bud Powell, Art Tatum—all the people who were really happening in the mid-1940s. I guess you could say I made my professional debut at 15. I had a buddy who also played piano, and we’d both slip into a little club down the street and take turns playing for whatever they’d put in the kitty.” Not long after that, Johnny joined a band led by Kenny Hale, a Kenton-style group. “Hale is a first cousin of Don DeMicheal, the critic who became editor of Downbeat; in fact, sometimes Don would sit in with us on drums.”

Smith was 18 when he left Louisville. For a while, he lived in Cleveland, playing with groups led by saxophonist Jimmy Hinsley and guitarist Willie Lewis.

Around the time he came of age, his ears were captivated by the sound of Wild Bill Davis, who had just begun to show the possibilities of transferring modern jazz sounds to the electric organ. Inspired by Davis, and also to some extent by Bill Doggett, Johnny gradually made the changeover from piano to organ himself.

“I was the first jazz organist in Cleveland—or, to put it another way, the first jazz musician in Cleveland even to own an organ. I began working around in small combos.

“Believe it or not, I was playing from the very start pretty much the way I’m playing now. I played single lines then, then built up to shout out-choruses with big chords and so forth, just the way I do today. The only difference at first was that I hadn’t turned the vibrato off the organ, whereas Jimmy Smith had. Later, around 1957, I began turning it off.”

Shortly after Hammond’s acquisition of an organ, Wild Bill Davis left the Chris Columbus group in which he had been working. Johnny got the job with Columbus and went almost immediately to New York. From that point on, he shuttled between New York and Cleveland as alternate homes.

In 1958, he had his first opportunity to extend his popularity through records. “I was working in Columbus, Ohio, with Nancy Wilson who was more or less unknown at that time. Some man came in, heard the group and offered us a contract. He said, ‘I’ll give that girl a deal, too.’ But Nancy said, ‘No, when I sign a contract, I’m going to sign with a big company.’ She was smart. Only a year later, she had a contract with Capitol.”

Johnny went ahead and recorded for the independent label. Soon afterward, in 1959, recommended by tenor saxophonist Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, he was offered a deal with Prestige.

If the mid-Seventies are “the age of the synthesizer,” then the mid-Sixties were “the age of the organ.” Johnny Hammond helped make it happen.

During that time, he played in some of the more popular New York organ rooms, such as Count Basie’s, Minton’s, and the Shalimar. Whatever his claims about having played the same style all along, he certainly managed during those years to develop and strengthen the basic characteristics of his style.

Among the problems that seem to confine too many of the present-day school of organists is that they tend to work almost exclusively out of two alternating bags. One is the blues-funk-soul style, often with elaborate “look-ma-no-limit-to-the-notes-I-can-play” overtones. The other is a ballad approach that lapses all too often into virtual somnolence.

Johnny Hammond seems to have overcome these restrictions. Certainly he knows as well as anyone how to play on the audience’s emotions through an inspired and ingeniously planned crescendo, with admirable use of his not inconsiderable technique. But his uptempo and ballad performances seem to be all of a piece, products of the same inventive mind, rather than opposite musical poles.

In his albums, and in his performances, he invariably shows that harmonic ideation, rhythmic sensitivity, and melodic values can be applied to every number he plays.

“Can be applied” is the important phrase here, rather than “must be applied.” On some tunes, he hovers around a single chord for several minutes, without even bordering on monotony. On others, he concentrates on a display of his exceptional technical command of the console.

Gears, Hammond’s Milestone debut LP released late last year, was his second collaboration with producers Larry and Fonce Mizell. For this new LP, Forever Taurus, he teamed with top LA arranger Wade Marcus and they’ve come up with a very strong, commercial, danceable, musical album.

Johnny gets his music across to his audience—whether they’re sitting in their living rooms listening to an LP or in a nightclub or concert hall. Hammond’s virtuosity and talent cuts through every time—he plays with tremendous feeling, which is the very most that can be said about anyone!

Johnny “Hammond” Smith died June 4, 1997.

Johnny Hammond - Tell Me What To Do (1975)

Idris Muhammad

Idris Muhammad(Drummer)
Idris Muhammad(Drummer) | Source

Idris Muhammad - Loran's Dance - 1974 [Soul-Jazz]

Idris Muhammad - Turn This Mutha Out

Idris Muhammad

Idris Muhammad was born on November 13,1939, and began playing the drums at age 8 in his native New Orleans. By the time he was 16, he was performing in jazz bands. Muhammad became known as one of the most innovative drummers in soul music of the 1960s, performing with singers Sam Cooke, Jerry Butler, and The Impressions.

He played for the popular musical Hair while performing with the house band for the Prestige Label in the early 1970s. For the rest of that decade, he accompanied popular singer Roberta Flack, led his own band, and worked with Johnny Griffin and Pharaoh Sanders.An excellent drummer who has appeared in many types of settings, Idris Muhammad became a professional when he was 16.

He played primarily soul and R&B during 1962-1964 and then spent 1965-1967 as a member of Lou Donaldson's band. He was the house drummer at Prestige Records (1970-1972), appearing on many albums as a sideman. Of his later jazz associations, Muhammad played with Johnny Griffin (1978-1979), Pharaoh Sanders in the 1980s, George Coleman, and the Paris Reunion Band (1986-1988).

He has recorded everything from post-bop to dance music as a leader for such labels as Prestige, Kudu, Fantasy, Theresa, and Lipstick. Muhammad's 1993 recording My Turn includes saxophonist Grover WashingtonJr., trumpeter Randy Brecker, both of whom are also featured performers in this year's 25th Annual University of Pittsburgh Jazz Seminar and Concert.

Idris Muhammad - Say What

Idris Muhammad - See Saw - 1978

"Big" John Patton

Dr. J Said: "Patton didn't play the kind of consistently advanced solos that Larry Young and Jimmy Smith played - not his bag - but he was a highly talented and tasty player, and in my opinion of the 3 was by far the ultimate "groove master." Smith w
Dr. J Said: "Patton didn't play the kind of consistently advanced solos that Larry Young and Jimmy Smith played - not his bag - but he was a highly talented and tasty player, and in my opinion of the 3 was by far the ultimate "groove master." Smith w

"Big John Patton ~ "Ding Dong"

"Big" John Patton ~ "Soul Woman"

"Big" John Patton Then Came Along

John Patton (born July 12, 1935, in Kansas City, Missouri, died March 19, 2002, in Montclair, New Jersey), sometimes nicknamed Big John Patton, was a soul jazz organ player. He was not nearly as well-known as other warriors in the organ jazz field of the 1960s, yet he could be counted upon for a reliable, even fervent collection of blues and bop-saturated licks and steady bass lines on the Hammond B-3.

Mostly self-taught with some rudimentary instruction from his mother, Patton started playing piano in 1948, eventually landing a gig with the Lloyd Price touring band from 1954 to 1959, before moving to New York. Once there, he began to make the transition from piano to organ, learning a lot from future two recording mates, drummer Ben Dixon and guitarist Grant Green.

He recorded with Lou Donaldson for Blue Note from 1962 to 1964 and, after impressing Blue Note founder Alfred Lion, made the first of a string of albums as a leader for the label in 1963. Interestingly, many of his albums, though scheduled for release, never saw the light of day until after Blue Note’s resurrection in 1985.

When the Hammond B-3 and soul-jazz went out of fashion in the 1970s, Patton’s career went into eclipse as well, and he settled in East Orange, NJ. But, shortly after he started recording again in 1983, Patton was rediscovered by a younger generation, particularly the avant-garde figure John Zorn, who began using his sound out of its usual context on recordings like The Big Gundown and Spillane’s “Two-Lane Highway.”

His music evolved to incorporate elements of modal and free jazz, without ever losing the basic, earthy groove that he brought to it from the beginning.

He wrote some classics and will be remembered fondly both by musicians and fans. His stellar work included “Funky Mama” and Along Came John. During the late 60s John recorded some very adventurous music for the Blue Note label with artists such as Harold Alexander and George Coleman on LPs such as Understanding and Accent on the Blues.

Of particular note on the early sessions recorded for Blue Note both under his own name and also with George Braith, Don Wilkerson and Lou Donaldson was the superlative empathy he developed with guitarist Grant Green and drummer Ben Dixon - an organ trio whose work in the soul jazz genre remains unsurpassed to this day.

Since the resurgence in interest in music from this period Blue Note has unearthed many sessions that lay in the vaults.

John Patton - Soul Man

John Patton - "Congo Chant"

"Big" John Patton - Chitlins con Carne

"Big" John Patton - The Silver Meter

On a Patton Tilt and Swing

I have been listening to John Patton since I was a kid in the Ghetto of Soweto, and have found him to be able to caress and massage my soul and spirit. If I indulge the listener with several of his Vibe, it is because it never ages neither dull. It might not make one jump to the ceiling, but instead cutting the carpet is a much more driving sound.

He rollicks and spins my listening core; he tickles the cops in tandem with the body gyrating to his dominant licks on the Orga. Whether it is a B3 or whatever organ, I know for a fact that he makes one feel ebullient and very jazzed up and be Funked up, too, the hilt.

He is really an artist who Gives us the "Congo Chant" to Rhythm us in the pure African vibe, and we get to Have an "Understanding" of his Groove much. Whilst one will be chomping on the meal, it is spiced and made tasty by being spice up with the "Chitlin con Carne", making all (usually I hang out with my dear friend(s) who might be or hardcore "Soul Men" and "Soul Women"", that in the end we jam to the evergreen and exotic and far-flung sounds of John Patton in a "Big" way.

These are my own impressions as an 'appreciator' of the music of Jazz in all its forms and sounds/vibes/and its Rare-grooves. As I listen to John Patton, life has never stood still, it has pierced the Dark Matter and the Universe and always reverberates in the Cosmos consistently, harmoniously and 'Soulfully. It's all Jazzy and Funky!'

The Soul Man has given us hops and skips in the music that we will miss him very much. His music makes me hum from the inner caverns of my singing and musical soul. One cannot get enough of the way John Patton marshall's the music to touch ones hidden self and inner-sanctum of the spiritual soul. His Vibey, Funky and Soulful licks keep on giving.

Mosaic Select - "Big"John Patton ...

'Big' John Patton - The Rock

Understanding by Big John Patton

Freddie Hubbard

Freddie Hubbard
Freddie Hubbard | Source

Freddie Hubbard Live in Holland - First Light

Freddie Hubbard - "Red Clay" ~ (1976)

Freddie Hubbard

Frederick Dewayne “Freddie” Hubbard (trumpet, flugelhorn) was born on April 7, 1938, in Indianapolis, Indiana and passed away on December 29, 2008, in Sherman Oaks, California at the age of 70.

The son of a mason, he was one of six children, the youngest but for his sister. His mother was active in the local church (he later played trumpet there).

Lionel Hampton came to town during Hubbard’s youth, and distributed instruments as part of his longstanding commitment to the black community. Freddie was interested in the drums but when all the drums were gone he was left with a bugle. He played sousaphone (marching band tuba) in school. But at 11 his parents divorced and this threw the family into disarray. His older siblings had to move out to support themselves. His mother was so poor that a local agency tried to get Freddie put into a foster home. His mother collected food stamps, his sister went to work, and he did odd jobs, but began practicing music constantly as his way of getting out of poverty and the ghetto.

Hubbard started playing the mellophone and trumpet in his school band at Arsenal Technical High School in Indianapolis, Indiana. Trumpeter Lee Katzman, former sideman with Stan Kenton, recommended that he begin studying at the Arthur Jordan Conservatory of Music (now the Jordan College of Fine Art at Butler University) with Max Woodbury, the principal trumpeter of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra.

In his teens Hubbard worked locally with brothers Wes and Monk Montgomery and worked with bassist Larry Ridley and saxophonist James Spaulding. In 1958, at the age of 20, he moved to New York, and began playing with some of the best jazz players of the era, including Philly Joe Jones, Sonny Rollins, Slide Hampton, Eric Dolphy, J. J. Johnson, and Quincy Jones. In June 1960 Hubbard made his first record as a leader, Open Sesame, with saxophonist Tina Brooks, pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Sam Jones, and drummer Clifford Jarvis.

In December 1960, Hubbard was invited to play on Ornette Coleman’s Free Jazz after Coleman had heard him playing with Don Cherry.

Then in May 1961, Hubbard played on Olé Coltrane, John Coltrane’s final recording session with Atlantic Records. Together with Eric Dolphy, Hubbard was the only ‘session’ musician who appeared on both Olé and Africa/Brass, Coltrane’s first album with ABC/Impulse! Later, in August 1961, Hubbard made one of his most famous records,Ready for Freddie, which was also his first collaboration with saxophonist Wayne Shorter. Hubbard joined Shorter later in 1961 when he replaced Lee Morgan in Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. He played on several Blakey recordings, including Caravan, Ugetsu, Mosaic, and Free For All. Hubbard remained with Blakey until 1966, leaving to form the first of several small groups of his own, which featured, among others, pianist Kenny Barron and drummer Louis Hayes.

It was during this time that he began to develop his own sound, distancing himself from the early influences of Clifford Brown and Morgan, and won the Downbeat jazz magazine “New Star” award on trumpet.

Throughout the 1960s Hubbard played as a sideman on some of the most important albums from that era, including, Oliver Nelson’s The Blues and the Abstract Truth, Eric Dolphy’s Out to Lunch, Herbie Hancock’s Maiden Voyage, and Wayne Shorter’s Speak No Evil. He recorded extensively for Blue Note Records in the 1960s: eight albums as a bandleader, and twenty-eight as a sideman. Hubbard was described as “the most brilliant trumpeter of a generation of musicians who stand with one foot in ‘tonal’ jazz and the other in the atonal camp”. Though he never fully embraced the free jazz of the 1960s, he appeared on two of its landmark albums: Coleman’s Free Jazz and Coltrane’s Ascension, as well as on Sonny Rollins’ 1966 ‘New Thing’ track East Broadway Run Down with Elvin Jones and Jimmy Garrison.

Later career

Hubbard achieved his greatest popular success in the 1970s with a series of albums for Creed Taylor and his record label CTI Records, overshadowing Stanley Turrentine, Hubert Laws, and George Benson. Although his early 1970s jazz albums Red Clay, First Light,Straight Life, and Sky Dive were particularly well received and considered among his best work, the albums he recorded later in the decade were attacked by critics for their commercialism.

First Light won a 1972 Grammy Award and included pianists Herbie Hancock and Richard Wyands, guitarists Eric Gale and George Benson, bassist Ron Carter, drummer Jack DeJohnette, and percussionist Airto Moreira. In 1994, Freddie, collaborating with Chicago jazz vocalist/co-writer Catherine Whitney, had lyrics set to the music of First Light.

In 1977 Hubbard joined with Herbie Hancock, Tony Williams, Ron Carter and Wayne Shorter, members of the mid-sixties Miles Davis Quintet, for a series of performances. Several live recordings of this group were released as VSOP, VSOP: The Quintet, VSOP: Tempest in the Colosseum (all 1977) and VSOP: Live Under the Sky (1979).

Hubbard’s trumpet playing was featured on the track “Zanzibar," on the 1978 Billy Joel album 52nd Street (the 1979 Grammy Award Winner for Best Album). The track ends with a fade during Hubbard’s performance. An “unfaded” version was released on the 2004 Billy Joel box set My Lives.

In the 1980s Hubbard was again leading his own jazz group — this time with Billy Childs and Larry Klein, among others, as members — attracting very favorable reviews, playing at concerts and festivals in the USA and Europe, often in the company of Joe Henderson, playing a repertory of hard-bop and modal-jazz pieces. Hubbard played at the legendary Monterey Jazz Festival in 1980 and in 1989 (with Bobby Hutcherson).

He played with Woody Shaw, recording with him in 1985, and two years later recorded Stardust with Benny Golson. In 1988 he teamed up once more with Blakey at an engagement in Holland, from which came Feel the Wind. In 1990 he appeared in Japan headlining an American-Japanese concert package which also featured Elvin Jones, Sonny Fortune, pianists George Duke and Benny Green, bass players Ron Carter, and Rufus Reid, with jazz and vocalist Salena Jones. He also performed at the Warsaw Jazz Festival at whichLive at the Warsaw Jazz Festival (Jazzmen 1992) was recorded.

Following a long setback of health problems and a serious lip injury in 1992 where he ruptured his upper lip and subsequently developed an infection, Hubbard was again playing and recording occasionally, even if not at the high level that he set for himself during his earlier career. His best records ranked with the finest in his field.

In 2006, The National Endowment for the Arts honored Hubbard with its highest honor in jazz, the NEA Jazz Masters Award.

On December 29, 2008, Hubbard’s hometown newspaper, The Indianapolis Star, reported that Hubbard had died from complications from a heart attack suffered on November 26.Billboard magazine reported that Hubbard died in Sherman Oaks, California.

Freddie Hubbard had close ties to the Jazz Foundation of America in his later years. Freddie is quoted as saying, “When I had congestive heart failure and couldn’t work, The Jazz Foundation paid my mortgage for several months and saved my home! Thank God for those people.” The Jazz Foundation of America’s Musicians’ Emergency Fund took care of him during times of illness. After his death, Hubbard’s estate requested that tax-deductible donations be made in his name to the Jazz Foundation of America. (The Jazz Trumpeter)

Jackie Mclean & Freddie Hubbard / Blues for Miles

Freddie Hubbard - "Straight Life"

Blue Mitchell

Blue Mitchell
Blue Mitchell

Blue Mitchell - Graffiti Blues

Blue Mitchell - Just Made Up

Blue Mitchell

Richard Allen (Blue) Mitchell (March 13, 1930, – May 21, 1979), was an American jazz, rhythm and blues, soul, rock, and funk trumpeter, known for many albums recorded as leader and sideman on Blue Note Records.

Mitchell was born and raised in Miami, Florida. He began playing trumpet in high school where he acquired his nickname, Blue.

After high school he played in the rhythm and blues ensembles of Paul Williams, Earl Bostic, and Chuck Willis. After returning to Miami he was noticed by Cannonball Adderley, with whom he recorded for Riverside Records in New York in 1958. He then joined the Horace Silver Quintet playing with tenor Junior Cook, bassist Gene Taylor and drummer Roy Brooks. Mitchell stayed with Silver’s group until the band’s break-up in 1964.

After the Silver quintet disbanded, Mitchell formed a group employing members from the Silver quintet substituting the young pianist Chick Corea for Silver and replacing a then sick Brooks with drummer Al Foster. This group produced a number of records for Blue Note disbanding in 1969, after which Mitchell joined and toured with Ray Charles till 1971.

From 1971 to 1973 Mitchell performed with John Mayall on Jazz Blues Fusion. From the mid — 70s he recorded, and worked as a session man in the genres noted previously, performed with the big band leaders Louie Bellson, Bill Holman and Bill Berry and was principal soloist for Tony Bennett and Lena Horne. Other band leaders Mitchell recorded with include Lou Donaldson, Grant Green, Philly Joe Jones, Jackie McLean, Hank Mobley, Johnny Griffin, Al Cohn, Dexter Gordon and Jimmy Smith. Blue Mitchell kept his hard-bop playing going with the Harold Land quintet up until his death from cancer on May 21, 1979, in Los Angeles, California at the age of 49.

Blue Mitchell- Blue Dashiki

Blue Mitchell - Flat Backing - 1969

Lou Donaldson

Ou Donaldson
Ou Donaldson | Source

Lou Donaldson: The Lost Grooves , 67-70

Lou Donaldson - "Curtis' Song"

Lou Donaldson Funky Mama

Lou Donaldson

One of the few remaining musicians that defined the sound of jazz after the bebop musical revolution, alto saxophonist Lou Donaldson illustrates the richness and ambiguities of jazz evolution during the crucial period between the late forties and early seventies. During these intense and fascinating times of contemporary United States history, jazz exploded into a variety of paths that ran parallel with different environments, artistic, social and political concerns.

In coexistence with the upcoming Black Power movement and its multiple expressions, jazz took off with different responses and approaches. Some were involved in an innovative search for something higher or qualitatively different, defined by strong personalities and (sometimes) artistic genius.

Others were part of a more popular or mass-representation culture that, despite holding generally high standards, was closer to the idea of popular music than to art. With people pulling from both sides—and all the conflicting mix around—both positions were finally criticized, though with the passing of time the innovator leader has usually been valued most, despite many not liking the results of their innovations.

Donaldson fits into the second category, and belongs to a group of musicians that more or less stayed faithful to their sound, aware that the music they played was not only their group creation but also a collective music meaningful for its impact on people. Often underestimated, Donaldson's music and trajectory not only speak about jazz's perception and guiding codes but also about more abstract matters such as the functions and roles of artistic expression in the contemporary world.

Born in Badin, North Carolina in 1926, Donaldson moved to New York in 1950, after the insistence of jazzmen like saxophonist Illinois Jacquet and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. Like most saxophonists at the time, he grew up with the influence of Charlie Parker, who inspired him to take in the bebop language. Donaldson's ability to sound like Bird earned him his first recording date for Blue Note, in fact, where he embodied the label's bluesy, night-evoking sound.

Coming out of the bebop foundations, Donaldson—along with people like pianist Horace Silver and trumpeter Clifford Brown—proved his virtuosity and skills, and made a name for himself by participating in legendary recordings including drummer Art Blakey's A Night at Birdland(Blue Note, 1954), a keystone for what came to be known as hard bop, a style that went back to the popular roots of blues and gospel.

Donaldson then took off on his own particular journey, absorbing new and classic sounds into his own language, and stressing the importance and value of groove and feeling. His first and biggest hit arrived in 1958 with "Blues Walk," an irresistible blues spiced up with percussionist Ray Barretto's Latin touch. The sensuality and nocturnal ambiance of the tune contributed to making Donaldson a crossover artist, admirable for taking jazz to the people and ultimately aligning himself in the understanding of jazz as popular music for regular people.

Assuming "Blues Walk" as his signature tune, Donaldson's music announced a changing African American sensibility that looked back to its past to better understand itself and its history. In a move that merged bebop and rhythm & blues as two dominant Black music forms, Donaldson's subsequent recordings stood out for their straight-ahead approach, blues base, and rhythmic repetition; a swinging soul potion that hung over a common cultural tradition and went for emotional, heartfelt communication.

In opposition to cool jazz arrangements and tricks, hard bop traced back to Black church imagery and devices, combining it with a talkative, colloquial, street-like style. Participating on albums such as organist Jimmy Smith's The Sermon (Blue Note, 1959), along with a dream team line-up (Art Blakey, trumpeter Lee Morgan, saxophonist Tina Brooks and guitarist Kenny Burrell), Donaldson soon incorporated the organ, contributing to the establishment of blues-based organ combos that would continue from then on.

Here 'Tis (Blue Note, 1961), a relaxed and happy album, was first, followed by The Natural Soul (Blue Note, 1962), where the altoist took a harder pulse and initiated a growing orientation towards dance that would continue with Signifyin' (Argo, 1963) and Alligator Bogaloo (Argo, 1967), culminating with a new high-point,Midnight Creeper (Blue Note, 1968).

The sound of what came to be known as soul jazz was commercially successful during the mid-sixties because of its connection with the audience. It drew on the "Black is beautiful" spirit of the times, the negritude beauty and body movement, and soul food's appeal. The music offered a sensual blend of elegant blues, funk and soul that was perfect for a chilling, compromised and smoking atmosphere.

But on the other hand, some critical voices aroused within the hard-core jazz world. Not only were they to criticize what they perceived as an accommodated version of jazz that followed a formula (opposed to a constant searching attitude), but they also fell into valuing music in terms of technical difficulty by labeling musicians like Donaldson as "uncomplicated bop."

It cannot be denied that certain recordings did not work out as smoothly as others, precisely for the difficulty of balancing emotional connection and harmony amongst band members, environment and audience, with a necessary extra touch to stand out. It may be true, then, that, immersed in rules of the entertainment industry and capitalist economy, great players like Lou Donaldson, on Blues Walk (Blue Note, 1958), and Lee Morgan with The Sidewinder (Blue Note, 1964), among others, overused certain musical treatments for commercial success.

However, the communicative and interactive nature of music must not be forgotten, as well as bearing in mind one of the possible goals of artistic search and expression: to communicate in a language that people can understand and, at the same time, offer freedom for improvisation and innovation in order to express particular personalities, without breaking the bond between the individual and the community.

Overall, the two paths sketched out here should not be seen as necessarily opposed or contradictory; one need not be chosen over the other. Instead, a wider analytical and aesthetic scope allows the distinguishing of different roles, functions and performances. A dynamic process that demands attention to the non-musical aspects that condition the perception of music, this position—rather than towards general acceptance—leads to a critical perspective, towards the valuing of jazz that revises the repetition of clichés.

In an incredible and unexpected opportunity, Lou Donaldson's recent European tour has given younger generations a more real connection with the glorious and idealized past of jazz and popular music. The energy and strength of the 85 year-old legend has brought many jazz fans and writers the chance to experience, first-hand, the melodies and rhythms that have previously only been discovered through celebrated recordings.

Donaldson reveals himself as a calm, easy-going gent that, unlike many, does not mythicize his past story. It is one of those special moments in a musical lifetime when a historic, mighty presence naturally shows up as a charming, laid-back person, ready to hold up his alto saxophone and blow his sweet and winding sound, tracing the down-home flavor lines that have drawn modern jazz. (Joseph Pedro)

Lou Donaldson - Everything I Do Gonna Be Funky (From Now On)

Lou Donaldson - Aw Shucks!

Lou Donaldson - The Kid

Lou Donaldson - "The Kid"

Say It Loud - Lou Donaldson - Say It Loud! (Im Black and Im Proud!)

Lou Donaldson Tenessee Waltz

The Lou Donaldson/South african African Jazz Funk Coonection

In the Mid to the late 1970s, at the height of Apartheid rule, music was one of the outlets we Africans depended upon. Particularly America Soul and R&B music. Specifically Jazz, which was the heartbeat of our survival against the harsh and cruel realities of Apartheid. Jazz afforded us a chance to see beyond our miseries and have hope. It was at this time that James brown, and Lou Donaldson's version of James' Song "I am Black and I am Proud' that was a huge picker-upper. Donaldson's style of music made us have hope against all odds.

His jazz funk, which at that time in South Africa we called "Afro-Jazz," instilled in us the idea that there is a better world beyond our suffering. The new sounds he played, made us feel real and special. We knew that he was Africa(Black); we knew that the vibe resonated with our soul in much the same way it Affected the present-day African Americans during that same time period. Also, the Apartheid regime was rabid about censorship.

Even though this music was banned for its title, and many other books and magazines, including musical bands within South Africa, we managed to get the Vinyls of the music of the artists like Lou Donaldson, Monk Higgins, Donald, and the whole slew of African American musicians.

It was not only the lyrics that sent us gyrating and jitter-bugging(name of a jazz dance by African South Africans) across the rooms and dance hall throughout South Africa, but the rhythm, sounds, vibes and grooves were fresh, revolutionary and very modern to us. If the Internet hurled contemporary society in the technological, African America music in the form of jazz, Soul, R&b and Spirituals(as we called them) eased us into the modern era and the fast changing musical sounds emanating from the Black(African) sounds of America.

Lou Donaldson made our hungry stomachs feel like "Pot Bellies". In fact, we felt too that "Everything We DO(DId) Was [Really] Going To Be Funky." The reader listener should remember that Apartheid made sure we lived in total misery and oppression. Lou Donaldson, made us feel like we are "The Kid(s)" of the future, with hard driving Boogaloo Grooves that launched us and our dejected states into a hopeful and very lively future.

We have South African African created Jazz bands and Big-bands of our brand. We also imbibed the music of Jazz from the early 1900s to the present-day jazz improvs. The thing I am saying is that we Africans in South Africa were privy to jazz in all it's genres and sounds.Amongst us as African people in South Africa, there are those who still believe in Classical/Avante garde jazz; then there was my generation which boarded the musical train from the fifties all the way to Y2K. We were buoyed by the music and groovy sounds of the jazz/funk of Lou Donaldson, that I thought I should add this bit of information as to the affect and effect of the music of Donaldson and his peers that gave hope to the enslaved Africans of South Africa

Monk Higgins

Monk Higgins
Monk Higgins

Monk Higgins - Up on the Hill

Monk Higgins & The Specialistes "Feeling You Feeling Me"

By the time we came to be introduced to the music of Monk Higgins(and we got most of him when he was playing with Gene Harris and the Three Sounds), we, in south Africa, are fully immersed into the Funk Genre, and we really dug it when it was incorporated into the jazz tunes of the 60s, 70s, 80s. 90s and Y2K.

Monk Higgins symphonized and funkified jazz and made it more soulful and really meaningful which was leading us to the 1970s and 80s.

We begun forming the earliest known Jazz Clubs from the High Schools we attended. We met on Weekends where we would show-off our newly discovered American artists. This helped us to begin to appreciate the music of jazz in all its diversity. Everyone who belonged to these jazz clubs had to bring brand new and unheard-of or unknown artists and their newly released tunes.

This was when we would 'repeat After'[the music} others introduced us to. Monk Higgins was at the top of the pile in those days, and we really dug him and studied the album's liner notes in order to get to know more about the artist. Down Beat magazine, although the issues would be months late, were part of the stuff we incorporated into listening to different artists and developing our jazz listening appreciation 'get-togethers'.

Monk Higgins - Can't Stop - 1972

MONK HIGGINS & THE SPECIALITIES-Big water bed

MONK HIGGINS & THE SPECIALITIES-Last flight to Dallas

Musician, Composer, Monk Higgins

Monk Higgins, 50, a former Chicago social worker and public school music teacher, was a composer, musician, arranger and producer in Los Angeles. He recorded albums for MCA, United Artists, ABC-Dunhill, Chess and his own recording company, Almon.

Services were held July 9 at the Greater New Bethel Baptist Church in Inglewood, Calif. He died July 3 at a Los Angeles hospital.

He composed many songs that have been recorded by such artists as Blood, Sweat and Tears, Little Milton, Gloria Lynn and Stanley Tourrentine. His own recordings include ``Monk Higgins--Heavyweight`` for United Artists and

``Dance to the Disco Sax of Monk Higgins.``

``His music was a combination of soul and jazz,`` said a friend, J. Herbert King. ``He wrote the music for the Toyota and Mogen David ads and, most recently, has been the entertainment director of Memory Lane, a nightclub owned by Marla Gibbs, who played the maid on the television show ``The Jeffersons.``

He composed the music for the motion picture ``Sheba Baby,`` starring Pam Grier.

Mr. Higgins was born Milton Bland in Menifee, Ark. After graduating from Arkansas State University with a music degree, he did advanced studies at the Chicago School of Music. He taught first in the music department at Central High School in Hayti, Mo., and then in the Chicago public school system. He temporarily left music instruction to be a social worker for the Cook County Department of Public Aid.

He returned to music and in the early 1960s became music director and arranger for Onederful Records and later a recording artist, producer and arranger at Chess Records, both in Chicago.

In 1968, he went to Los Angeles to record and to produce for ABC-Dunhill. He produced the album ``MacArthur Park,`` featuring his tenor sax. He arranged ``Elegant Soul`` and ``Soul Symphony`` for the Blue Note label. Both became hits.

In May, 1985, the City of Los Angeles passed a special commendation for him and his contributions to other recording artists.

Survivors include his wife, Virginia, and three daughters, Joan, June and Janesse.

Sonny Phillips

Sonny Philllps
Sonny Philllps

Sonny Phillips - Be Yourself

Sonny Phillips - Bean Pie

Sonny Phillips

Sonny Phillips (b. December 7, 1936, Mobile, Alabama) is an American jazz keyboardist. His primary instrument is electric organ but he often played piano. Phillips began playing jazz organ after hearing Jimmy Smith in his twenties. He studied under Ahmad Jamal, and played in the 1960s and 1970s with Lou Donaldson, Nicky Hill, Eddie Harris, Houston Person, and Gene Ammons. His debut album was released in 1969, and he released several further records as a leader before suffering a long illness in 1980. He went into semi-retirement after this and moved to Los Angeles; since then he has performed and taught occasionally. Leader Discography, Sure 'Nuff (Prestige Records, 1969), Black Magic (Prestige, 1970), Black on Black (Prestige, 1970), My Black Flower (Muse Records, 1976), I Concentrate on You (Muse, 1977), Sideman Discography, with Rusty Bryant Rusty Bryant Returns (Prestige, 1969), with Ivan "Boogaloo Joe" Jones Boogaloo Joe (Prestige, 1969), with Houston Person Goodness (Prestige, 1969), with Billy Butler Guitar Soul (Prestige, 1969), with Gene Ammons Brother Jug (Prestige, 1969), with Houston Person The Truth (Prestige, 1970), with Houston Person Person to Person (Prestige, 1970), with Houston Person The Real Thing (Eastbound, 1973), with Ivan "Boogaloo Joe" Jones Black Whip (Prestige, 1973), with Willis Jackson In The Alley (Muse, 1976), with Houston Person Stolen Sweets (Prestige, 1976), with Houston Person Wild Flower (Prestige, 1977), with Etta Jones Don't Misundertand - Live In New York (High Note, 1980), with Bernard Purdie Coolin' and Groovin' (Lexington, 1993)

Sonny Phillips - Sure 'nuff, Sure 'nuff

Sonny Phillips - Black On Black

Donald Byrd

Donald Byrd
Donald Byrd

Donald Byrd - Cristo Redentor

Donald Byrd - "Beast Of Burden" ~ 1963

DONALD BYRD - "Elijah (Byrd)"

Donald Byrd

In a world where most men are satisfied realizing only a minimal output, Donald Byrd, musician, professor, and cultural researcher, stands out for his numerous contributions to his vocation and his race.

An accomplished trumpeter since 1955, he has more recently cultivated an enormous amount of knowledge about Afro-American music…its origins, its significance, and its future. In fact, he is considered one of the country's foremost authorities on the subject, and currently instructs courses at five universities on performing techniques and the history of this long-neglected ethnic music.

During the college year, Byrd, headquartered in his Manhattan apartment, comes to Washington, DC three times a week for his classes at Howard University. As head of the Institute of Jazz Studies there, he has completely revamped the curriculum since his arrival several years ago, so that now the courses offered at the predominantly Negro university stress the presence of pure African music in American jazz.

At Howard, Byrd teaches seminars in Afro-American Music History, and Composition and Arranging, and is the conductor of the university's jazz band. On the days he remains in New York, he instructs students at Brooklyn College in Afro-American History, and the methods for stimulating interest in music in ghetto areas.

Since his affiliation with these two outstanding educational institutions seem to take up most of the week, it seems incredible that Donald Byrd finds time for yet another professional endeavor! At Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, he remains a "composer in residence" and is the conductor of the jazz orchestra. Also, at the state university he is involved with the world-acclaimed Marshall Stearns Jazz Collection, a compilation of over 25,000 albums which traces the history of jazz in this country.

Summer, usually means a vacation from work for most teachers, however Byrd, feeling the need to share his valuable knowledge with as many students as possible, has extended his "school year" to twelve months. During June, July and August of this year, he will be on the summer faculty of North Carolina College in Durham, North Carolina and New York University in Greenwich Village.

At the Southern school, where Byrd feels that acquainting the students with their ethnic heritage is critical, he will be giving lectures on Negro history, and setting up symposiums in Afro-American music. At the same time, he will be teaching a course at NYU for music educators on Afro-American musical techniques. It is the first such course to be taught in New York City, and is being sponsored by the New York State Education Department, in conjunction with the Division of Music Education at the school.

Donald Byrd was born December 9, 1932, in Detroit, the son of a musically inclined Methodist minister. After a brief stint at Wayne University, he joined the Air Force at the age of 18, where he played in service bands from 1951-54. After his discharge in 1955, he moved to New York where he was first heard as a member of George Wallington's quintet.

In December of that year he joined Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers, and from there he gigged around with Max Roach, and was subsequently signed to an exclusive recording contract with Blue Note Records. Considering the academic aspects of music as important as the professional, during this period he attended Columbia University, and ultimately earned his MA degree from the Manhattan School of Music.

His international reputation grew during the late 50's, when he spent several months playing at festivals in Belgium, and on the French Riviera. He gave performances through most of Scandinavia, and took part in two motion pictures in France and one in Germany. His continental appearances in recent years have included jazz festivals at Juan les Pins, France; Reckinghausen, Germany; Stockholm, Sweden; and Molde, Norway.

In August, after he completes his summer instruction, Byrd will be traveling to East Africa to gather information for a future seminar. It is here, in the "cradle of civilization," that Byrd feels much can be discovered about the ancient black man and his music. He was initially drawn to exploring this area by reports of cave etchings, possibly dated as far back as 5000 BC, which show musicians playing an assortment of unique instruments.

His upcoming LP on Blue Note Records is a compilation of authentic African music, utilizing the dialect of several tribes. The most current albums by Donald Byrd, Blackjack, A New Perspective, and I'm Trying To Get Home, have been extremely successful in both their sales and critical reviews.

"There just aren't enough hours in the day" is an apt cliché for Donald Byrd, as he also has managed to cram the following activities into his busy schedule: hosting a regularly presented television show on N. E. T. (educational television), acting as a music consultant to Hampton Institute in Virginia, performing in a jazz festival in New Jersey on July 27 with Blood, Sweat and Tears, coordinating jazz performances for students at Prince Tech in Hartford, Connecticut, and preparing a syllabus in Afro-American music courses for secondary and elementary schools in New York State.

As a future goal, Donald plans to begin attending law school at night in the fall. He feels that the most practical way of tracing the black man's history, besides through his music, is through law. Since there is practically no preserved documentation on the Negro prior to 1865, it is Byrd's opinion that much can be learned from studying the legal aspects of slavery, and other pre-Civil War court cases.

"My friends are convinced, with each new project I take on, or new cause I espouse, that I will work myself to an early grave…or, at least, a premature deterioration. However, I feel that the more active and diversified a man becomes, the more favorable opinion he can have of himself…and this, of course, puts him in a much better position to help others. Concerning my interest in African music and culture, I feel that even though the black man has been progressing during the past ten years, with an acute desire to learn his true heritage and history, there's still more. Now, I want every Negro man, woman and child in the nation to be able to say with dignity: 'I'm black, and I'm proud.' A simple request."

Donald Byrd performs 'Blackbyrd' at the Montreux Jazz Festival 1973

Donald Byrd - "Black Byrd"

Donald Byrd - Flight Time

Love Has Come Around / DONALD BYRD AND 125TH STREET,N.Y.C

Heightened and Masterful MasterJazz vibes and grooves of Donald Byrd and the Struggle of South Africa


We in South Africa grew with music as if it was our breathing. By the Time Byrd's jazz/funk hit the scene, we were already deep into the struggle to free our people. When Donald Byrd recorded his music, giving us a 'New Perspective,' and 'Christo Redentor'-which bode well too for the more religiously inclined— we already knew of Our Status as 'Beasts Of Burden'. So that, with these tracks, Byrd gave us spiritual breadth and depth, also he enhanced our philosophical, intellectual and meant capacities with his "new Perspectives" that we began to roll and charged on the Apartheid regime with the gusto, of curse, Bantu Biko's Black Consciousness spurring us on.

For Us, this was the Height of the golden age of listening to the evolving sounds of jazz, and Byrd gave us all and then some. Music was a counter, for us Africans here in Mzantsi, to the dreaded and decrepit life that Apartheid foisted on us. It was a perfect counterweight and a very strong motivator for us to have consistently hope and we knew that the day when the Apartheid thugs would be toppled was nigh. June 1976 Students revolt provided us with that perfect opportunity. See my Hub on the 1976 Students Revolt of 1976 for this Sad times, and Bad time saga. In a word, we knew that when "Flight Time" for the Black Byrd to take off into our Freedom, through our Students Revolution, at that time, we knew that "Love Had Come Around" - No more Apartheid Hatred as an albatross on our necks again.

The effect that American African artists have had on us during the height of Apartheid a strong bonds we formed and attached to the artists and their music. There were nuances in the lyrics and the impeccable notes that gave us a sense of comfort and sophistication since we reckoned we could understand and relate to the music. This helped us go through those hard and terrible Apartheid slave times with an ease of an easel.

Art Porter

Art Porter
Art Porter | Source

Art Porter~Inside Myself

Art Porter - Texas Hump Live

Art Porter - Pocket City

Art Porter , Jr.

The Porter family legacy is one steeped not only in music but education as well.

“Both of my parents were educators,” Benita Porter Browning said. “Higher education was not an option or a discussion. Education and church were the center of our family.” ArtSr., bachelor’s and master’s degrees and taught music on the university-level for a time, and wife Thelma Pauline Porter taught intermediate school and later became a librarian. They had five children, four of whom formed a band and for a number of years performed at schools, churches and other community events. ArtJr., on to become a successful, in-demand musician.

He and ArtSr., at Pres. Clinton’s inauguration. In fact, Clinton was a family friend, and under his tenure as Arkansas’ attorney general, helped pass a bill, the Art Porter Bill, allowing underage musicians, accompanied by a parent, to play in adult facilities.

When Art, Sr., who was once called “a state treasure,” died in July 1993, ArtJr., his mother established the Art Porter, Sr. Music Education Foundation in 1994 to honor his father’s memory. Following Art Jr.’s death, at 35, in a 1996 boat accident, and his wife’s death in 2001, the foundation’s fundraising activities were suspended.

“We didn’t want the foundation to become defunct, however, with Art’s and Barbi’s deaths, raising the children became first priority,” Browning said. Browning serves as the foundation’s executive director. Now that the children have matured, the family and friends have once again turned their attention to benefiting others, a mission held dear by Art, Sr. Last year, Browning, and the man she describes as the driving force for APME, Sterling Ingram, and the board decided to revive APME.

Prior to 2011, the foundation raised funds during one event with one national recording artist. Last year, the organizers relaunched their efforts with an entire week of events, at various venues, featuring local and national artists as well as music students paired with professionals.

One such student is Lexington Porter, a violinist, and Art Sr.’s grandson. He, Art III who lives in Tennessee and plays the saxophone as well as Arrington who lives in Chicago and plays piano, continues the family’s legacy of musical talent.

Lexington graduated from high school this spring and will pursue a degree in music. Browning said he is the only family member who has chosen to pursue music as a career. He was introduced to the violin by an elementary teacher.

“Lexington didn’t want to play initially. Now he’s so glad that my mother made him practice — he’s really grateful for the gift,” Browning said.

“I feel my musical family, past and present, around me when I perform,” Lexington said. “Whenever I feel overwhelmed or unsure, it is my grandfather’s presence that is particularly strong, and I can feel him guiding me through my uncertainties.”

He has also followed in his grandfather’s footsteps of giving back to others. He recently presented a violin to Karson Bone, a Little Rock elementary school student. APME heard of Karson’s attachment to the instrument through his school counselor. After being introduced to the violin, he began carrying a laminated likeness of the instrument with him everywhere.

“I didn’t realize, I’d get so much pleasure from working with younger children. I can see myself in them, and there is a musical understanding between us,” Lexington said.

Lorenzo Smith, music instructor, gives Karson lessons free of charge. “Karson is inspired. Initially, Lorenzo was skeptical, he’s offered free lessons to many students over the years and not many stick with it, but Karson won him over. He’s just incredible. He was excited about receiving the instrument, and at his first lesson with Lorenzo, he said, ‘I remember everything Lexington taught me,’” Browning said.

Karson will perform during the APME weeklong celebration. The budding musician is just one who owes a debt to a Porter. Browning said, “The musicians who take part [in A Work of Art] donate their time and talent. So many of them knew Art, Jr. and Dad. They’ve said they’re honored to be a part. ‘We sat at your father’s feet … he mentored us. We owe him thanks, and because of Art, Jr. so many of us played in clubs when we were young.’”

During the APME’s first tenure, they awarded scholarships to five college-bound students. Monies raised last year and this will build that fund, and Browning said they plan to resume the awards next year. “We hope to give more scholarships in larger amounts. That’s our purpose … to carry out Dad’s dream, so the more we give, the happier we’ll be.”(Angela E. Thomas)

Art Porter Live

Art Porter - Undercover

LookIng Back On Porter

At this point in this Hub, I have indulged anyone who loved Art Porter as much as possible. He came into our lives in Mzantsi at the point when we reality wee a confident people and knew what the future, more or less, held for us.

His performance, music and bearing his soul and all out there, was a like an antidote in the present futre' that we were facing, without Apartheid His free spirit gave us most of our humanity back.

If I have given a lot of his music some posting here, it is because he was our our angel, now ancestor of free spirited and jolly funk/jazz we could have asked for at any time in our lives.
Art Porter opened our souls and spirits to a joyous world that awaited us.

He brought in new people in our closed Ghetto/Concentration camps called Townshipp. We celebrated happiness in all its fullness, and despite the fact that his soul is with the ancestors, he fits perfectly in he pantheon of our musical ancestors, and we are greatly indebted to Art Porter!

We hope your still be still and rest in peace. We also make mention of you to our long gone musical ancestors and hope they give you the spirits Ubuntu you so well displayed and poured out for us to enjoy. You left us a whole universe of total happiness. 'Lala Kahle ngoxolo'/'robala hantle ka Kgotso' (Rest In Peace), Brother Art Porter...

Art Porter - "Kgb"

Art Porter Quintet - "Straight to the point"

Art Porter Jr Great Live Performance!!

Art Porter "One More Chance"

Art Porter Jr Live Performance Dancing, Playing 2 Saxophones!!

Art Porter - Lost Logic

Grover Washington, Jr.

Grover Washington, Jr.
Grover Washington, Jr. | Source

Grover Washington Jr. - Mister Magic

Grover Washington Jr, Let it Flow (For "Dr. J")

Grover Washington, Jr.

Grover Washington, Jr. (December 12, 1943 - December 17, 1999) has been considered by many to be the founding father of Smooth jazz and a master of the Jazz Funk genre, working as a prominent songwriter and talented saxophonist. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Washington made some of the genre’s most memorable hits. These include “Mister Magic," Black Frost," and “The Best Is Yet To Come” (with Patti Labelle on guest vocals).

In addition, he performed very frequently with other artists, including Bill Withers on “Just The Two Of Us” (a song still in regular rotation on radio today) and Phyllis Hyman on “Sacred Kind Of Love”. He is also remembered for his take on a Dave Brubeck classic, called “Take Another Five," as well as for his hit “Soulful Strut”. His work continues to inspire jazz artists even today.

Washington was born in Buffalo, New York, 12 December 1943. Regarded as one of the revolutionaries in jazz music and is considered one of the greatest saxophone players in modern jazz history. He led many others to follow in his footsteps.

Washington’s history was music-filled. His mother was a church chorister, and his father was a collector of old jazz 78s and a saxophonist as well, so music was everywhere in the home. He grew up with the great jazz men and big band leaders like Benny Goodman, Fletcher Henderson, and others like them. At the age of 8, with the desire for him to be more than he could be, Grover, Sr. gave Jr. a saxophone. He practiced and sneaked into clubs to see famous Buffalo blues musicians.

He left Buffalo and played with a mid-west group called the Four Clefs. He was drafted into the US Army shortly thereafter, but this was to be to his advantage, as he met drummer Billy Cobham. Cobham, a mainstay in New York City, introduced Washington to many New York musicians. After leaving the Army, Washington freelanced his talents around New York City, eventually landing in Philadelphia in 1967.

Grover’s big break came at the expense of another artist. Alto sax man Hank Crawford was unable to make a recording date with Prestige Records, and Washington took his place, even though he was a backup. This led to his first album, Inner City blues. He was talented, and displayed heart and soul with soprano, alto, tenor, and baritone saxophones. Refreshing for his time, he made headway into the jazz mainstream. His fifth album, 1974s Mister Magic was a commercial success, and introduced guitarist Eric Gale in as a near-permanent member in Washington’s arsenal.

A string of acclaimed records brought Washington through the 1970s, which culminated in the signature piece for everything Washington would do from then on. 1980s Winelight was the album that defined everything Washington was about. The album was smooth, fused with r and b and easy listening feel. Washington’s love of basketball, especially the Philadelphia 76ers, led him to dedicate his first track, Let It Flow to Julius Erving (Dr. J).

The highlight of the album, and a main staple of radio airplay everywhere, was his great collaboration with soul artist Bill Withers, Just The Two Of Us. It was also the final step away from Motown, landing him on Elektra Records and into a new era of jazz excellence. The album went platinum in 1981, and also won Grammy Awards in 1982 for Best r and b Song (“Just The Two of Us”), and Best Jazz Fusion Performance (“Winelight”). “Winelight” was also nominated for Record of the Year and Song of the Year.

From that point, Washington is credited (or scorned, as some may say) for giving rise to a new batch of talent that would make its mark in the late 80s and early 90s. He is blamed for bringingKenny G to the forefront, but also credited with bringing such smooth jazz artists as Walter Beasley, SteveCole, Pamela Williams, Najee, George Howard, and The Philadelphia Experiment into popular attention.

The tragedy and irony of Washington’s life was that while he was able to get his big break from another artist’s absence, Washington lived long enough to bring smooth jazz to the last points of the old millennium, but didn’t outlive Hank Crawford, whose absence gave him his big break (and is still alive, as of 2005). On December 17, 1999, while waiting in the green room after taping four songs for the The Early Show, at CBS Studios in New York City, Washington collapsed. He was taken to St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at about 7:30 p.m. His doctors determined that he had suffered a massive heart attack.

Grover Washington Jr.’s legacy lives on in the futures of up-and-coming Jazz artists, and his life is celebrated from college campuses all around the nation to the hallowed streets of his own Philadelphia, his adopted hometown.

Grover Washington Jr. - Knucklehead - 1976 [Jazz-Funk]

Grover Washington Jr. - It Feels So Good

Grover Washington Jr - Soulful Strut

Grover Washington,Jr. - Village Groove - Soulful Strut

Grover Washington Jr. - Only For You

The Village Grooves with Mr. Magic-Grover Washington, Jr.

Grover Washington, the Master of Jazz Funk without any push-back from the music lovers. He was able to strut the music, and at the same time keep a conversation going with the naming of his Songs which were From Mister Magic himself. And, oh, it "Felt So Good". As we all know, in life there are those 'Knuckleheads' who appreciate nothing, but he made something for them nonetheless…

We all "Let it Flow" every time he entertained us with his Groove, Like I said, above, whenever he let his "Soulful Strut" rock us, even we in the villages of South Africa, we would Groove like he was with us. He reached upon us by making his background singers sing in our South African mother Tongue-What more could we ask for; he did it and we were very elated and jammed like there is no tomorrow, for he even said it in the last video Posted above, 'Only for You,' in Spanish, but it is for all of us who loved and still listen to Grover… May you keep on strutting your stuff, and we will continue grooving to your vibes, even us in the villages of Mzantsi-for your Magic, is always that, Mr. Magic.

George Howard

George Howard
George Howard | Source

George Howard-Steppin out

George Howard: "No No"

George Howard Live 1985 - A Nice Place to Be

George Howard

George Howard was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His earlier training could be best attributed to his classical training on the clarinet, and the bassoon. During his teen years, he often listened to jazz-rock, and soul. However, it was his father who first introduced him to the earlier jazz works, of Charlie “The Bird” Parker, and John Coltrane. Later on, he moved to the soprano saxophone, which was his signature sound and voice.

By the 70’s, George was performing with the tenor sax, for which he used to hone his skills, by performing with the local groups and gaining recognition through his session playing. This was soon followed by work with the pioneers of the Philly-sound: Kenny Gamble, Leon Huff and Dexter Wansel. While at Philly, George gained more notoriety through his work, with the groups, Harold Melvin and the Blues Notes, and Blue Magic.

His first major break occurred when he was invited, by his idol Grover WashingtonJr., join him on tour in 1979. And by the early 80’s he found himself actually recording under his own name. According to George, ”Playing with Grover gave me a real hunger.” “As far and learning the ropes and watching Grover, who is a consummate professional, I learned a whole lot of stuff from being in that environment.” “It really fired up my hunger, for having my own thing.”

George eventually landed a deal and recorded his first album entitled, ”Asphalt Garden," in 1982 on Palo Alto. The album was a moderate hit for George. Two years later, in 1984 he followed with his second album entitled, “Steppin-Out”. However, it wasn’t until 1985 that George actually gained a wider audience with the release of his third album entitled, “Dancing in the Sun”. With this release George found himself in the number one position on the contemporary jazz charts.

Through this experimentation, with his special fusion, of funk, jazz and urban soul, George found an audience who could identify with his music. This appeared to play a major role in his decision to seek a better understanding for the roots of his music when he made several trips to Africa to help define his dynamic style of playing.

This smooth mixture of jazz and soul helped to garner a larger audience, while playing the tenor, alto and soprano saxophones.

After the release of “Dancing In The Sun," he moved to the recording label of MCA. While there he recorded the albums, “A Nice Place To Be”(which included the theme song for the TV Series, 'Spenser For Hire'), “Reflections," “Personal," and “Love Will Follow”. All four albums were considered to be very successful on the music charts.

By 1991, George had signed with the new recording label GRP, and debuted with his eighth album entitled, “Love and Understanding”. This was followed by his 1992 release entitled, “Do I Cross Your Mind ," and his 1993 tenth album entitled, “When Summer Comes”. In 1994, George released his eleventh album entitled, “A Home Far Away," and two years later followed it with the 1996 release called, “Attitude Adjustment”.

For the last 14 years (eight years living in LA and six in Atlanta), and another ten albums under his belt George brought this collection of great tracks to his many listeners. This album was a combination, of his first five years with GRP, plus additional selections, from his MCA recordings. The 1997 release was simply entitled, “The Very Best of George Howard.”

A year later his next anticipated album was released in January 1998, which was entitled, “Midnight Mood.” It was greeted with excellent reviews. This album would be George Howard’s final release.

George’s career was still going strong, when he was diagnosed with lymphoma and died unexpectedly on March 22, 1998, in Atlanta, Georgia. Within a few months, George’s final recording would be released, as part of Blue Note’s Cover Series. The song was a version of Sly Stone’s, “There’s A Riot Goin’ On.”

George Howard Live 1985 - No No

George Howard Live 1985 - Steppin' Out

George Howard (live) - Dancing in the Sun

George Howard - "Let's Unwind

George Howard - "Philly Talk"

George Howard - A Whole Lotta Drum In Me

George Duke

George Duke
George Duke | Source

George Duke - Dukey Stick (Funk)

Reach For It - George Duke (1977)

Herbie Hancock - George Duke - Stanley Clark

George Duke

Along with Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea, and Bob James, GEORGE DUKE stands as one of the true master keyboardists of the late 20 century. After nearly forty remarkable years in music, Duke has performed with everyone from Cannonball Adderley to Frank Zappa. Add to this his incredibly soulful singing voice, production work and ground-breaking arrangements on several Grammy-winning projects, and numerous film and TV scoring projects, and it becomes crystal clear that George Duke's career is unrivaled in its pure excellence and limitless scope.

But of all of his accomplishments, his own recordings stand out as some of the most cutting-edge contemporary jazz and instrumental funk on the planet, a document of true brilliance and vision.

Born in San Rafael, California, George Duke was raised in a working class neighborhood in Marin County. After hearing another Duke, the great Duke Ellington, at the tender age of four, George reacted immediately, running around the house screaming, "'Get me a piano, get me a piano!'" Thankfully, his mother responded to his cries, and in addition to delving into serious piano studies, he became captivated by the gospel music he was exposed to in church. This pervasive influence of jazz, classical, and gospel music in his formative years would be a lethal creative combination that would sustain him throughout his illustrious career.

Duke studied at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, majoring in trombone and earning a composition degree in 1967. While studying for and eventually earning his Masters Degree in composition from San Francisco State University, George worked with a jazz trio around the Bay Area, a group that also backed a young rehabilitation counselor who was performing as a jazz singer on the side: the soon to be legendary Al Jarreau.

After working with Jean-Luc Ponty, the violinist introduced him to Frank Zappa, which led to the first of two extended stays with the Mothers of Invention. His contributions to classic recordings like The Grand Wazoo, Over-Nite Sensation,Apostrophe, and the film and recording 200 Motels display the incredible natural musicianship, staggering versatility, and keen sense of humor that made Duke a natural fit for the group.

At the end of 1970, Joe Zawinul left Julian "Cannonball" Adderley's band to form the groundbreaking group Weather Report, and George got the call to replace him. Through the great alto saxophonist, he had opportunities to work with some of the greatest artists in jazz, including Joe Williams, Nancy Wilson, and Dizzy Gillespie. It became clear that the uniquely talented keyboardist could expertly perform in staggeringly diverse styles of music. For example, in 1974 alone he recorded with jazz masters Adderley, Herb Ellis, and Ray Brown, Latin jazz trendsetters Flora Purim & Airto, soul prodigy Shuggie Otis, and fusion master Billy Cobham. However, even more important, he recorded two of his own genre-busting projects for the MPS label, Faces in Reflection and Feel.

Finally, in 1977, George signed to Epic Records, and released two recordings that would set the jazz/R&B/funk worlds on fire: From Me To You and the Gold-certified Reach For It. The latter was driven by the hard-core funk-infused title track, which reached #2 on the R&B charts. He followed this in 1978 by Don't Let Go, featuring the wonderfully goofy "Dukey Stick", a double entendre par excellence. Showing his complete mastery of modern soul and R&B, George followed these Parliament-influenced funkfests by delving into the multi-dimensional style of Earth Wind & Fire, represented here by "Say That You Will" from Follow the Rainbow.

The same year, in addition to releasing a second R&B project (Master of the Game) the astonishingly prolific and multi-talented multi-instrumentalist recorded one of his most compelling and lasting works: A Brazilian Love Affair. Represented here by the infectious title track, the project's synthesis of samba and funk created George's answer to Wayne Shorter's brilliant Native Dancer, and a chance to expose the enticing sounds of Brazil to yet another audience. To capture his vision authentically, George recorded most of the project in Rio, featuring Milton Nascimento, Simone, Toninho Horta and other Brazilian masters.

The 1980s were an especially active decade for Duke. In 1981, he teamed up with bassist Stanley Clarke to form the Clarke/Duke Project, and their hit single "Sweet Baby" was a huge crossover success. He also continued to record at an album-a-year pace, finally moving from Epic to Elektra Records in 1985. Additionally, his increased activity as a producer kept him working around the clock, with contributions to significant works by Jeffrey Osborne, Phillip Bailey, Rufus, Denise Williams, Angela Bofill and many others. He also finally had the opportunity to produce his old friend Al Jarreau, delivering the Gold-certified Heart's Horizon, in addition to contributing a track to the legendary Miles Davis's Warner Bros. debut, Tutu.

Finally, in 1989, Duke released Night After Night. Although the project got little support from his label, it was a very strong effort with George showing tremendous growth as an artist, tightening his focus on the sophisticated urban adult market. The Skip Scarborough-penned LTD classic "Love Ballad" features George's synthesizer on melody, and the innately human quality of his breathy keyboard sound melds seamlessly with the track's background vocals.

Although he was very tentative to embrace synthesizers when Frank Zappa first encouraged him to do, over time George became an important keyboard innovator, with an emphasis on emulating sounds that were particularly difficult due to their soulfully human elements. Around this time, he began to utilize the Synclavier, a very advanced digital synthesizer that, in addition to the ability to act as a programming and recording machine, could create amazingly real sounds.

Following his lack of commercial success on Elektra, George felt disenfranchised with the whole idea of being a solo artist, deciding to focus more on record production and other outside projects until the right situation came along.

Thankfully, after a performance at the Montreux Jazz Festival with vocalist Rachelle Ferrell, he was approached by the esteemed Chairman of Warner Bros. Records, Mo Ostin. As George puts it, "I was feeling real good about playing music again and was content to not have a record deal unless I could have the freedom to make unorthodox records as well as commercial ones."

When Ostin insisted that George make whatever kind of records he desired, George signed on immediately, and what followed was a terrific run of six varied but equally dazzling projects for the label.

Snapshot was Duke's most successful project since the ˜70's, and it was driven by the Quiet Storm chart-topper "No Rhyme, No Reason". A story of forbidden love told in George's passionate falsetto, and featuring the amazing Rachelle Ferrell, the track stands as a high watermark in a career with many outstanding highlights.

A deep in-the-pocket soulful groove, heartfelt vocals, and breathy synth sounds are all held together by the undeniably personal stamp of Duke's piano. Also from Snapshot is "6 O'Clock", a slam-dunk representation of the frequently attempted but too often cheesy urban-instrumental-with-vocal-hook track.

With the freedom to record diverse projects like the orchestral Muir Woods Suiteand After Hours, a Grammy-nominated concept album of romantic instrumentals, George was able to focus his other solo projects in a more cohesive direction.

What began with Snapshot continued with 1995's Illusions, featuring the track "Love Can Be So Cold", clearly the follow-up to "No Rhyme", following a similar story line delivered in his mellow conversational vocal style and utilizing what has become a Duke signature, the Milesian Harmon-muted trumpet synth sound.

He closed out his relationship with Warner Bros. by releasing Cool, which included the single "She's Amazing", written by and featuring the wonderfully sultry and soothing vocals of Chante Moore.

Following a nearly thirty-year run recording for major record labels, 2002 was the year that George Duke decided to go the independent route, starting his own company, Bizarre Planet Music. A move that many artists have made out of necessity, George's reason was based on his need to move onto the next chapter in his distinguished career with the complete freedom that comes from being your own boss.

"My Piano" from Face the Music felt like a perfect way to close out this collection. The track takes the listener on a fascinating musical journey, combining African, jazz, Latin, and contemporary Urban styles together, showing the connection between several African-derived musics within a focused approach. Tying together several musical threads with flair has been an ongoing theme in George Duke's career, and "My Piano" highlights this gift definitively.

Putting together the lineup for ULTIMATE GEORGE DUKE was a nearly impossible task - a 3-CD set couldn't do justice to this man's mind-blowing life in music thus far. But I can only hope that the injustice that I feel is done by whittling such an exceptional career down to eleven tracks is outweighed by the fact that this compilation can open a musical door for the uninitiated, an opportunity to view highlights from the peerless career of this contemporary keyboard genius.

Matt Pierson (February, 2007)

George Duke & Band - A Fonk Tail / Old Skool Medley

George Duke - It's Summertime

George Duke - "Is Love Enough"

George Duke - "George Duke - It's Our WorldIt's Our World"

Stanley Clarke

Stanley Clarke
Stanley Clarke | Source

Stanley Clarke - If This Bass Could Only Talk (1988)

Stanley Clarke - I Want To Play For You

Stanley Clarke - Wanna Play For You

Stanley Clarke

When bassists list people who constitute legends, there is one name that is continually mentioned: Stanley Clarke. There are very few bassists who have been as innovative, who have crossed styles and musical barriers, and who have changed the way we approach the bass in the way that Stanley has over his still-flourishing career. Was this an intentional guided evolution? Oh yes... In the first moments of our interview, Clarke admitted he was on a musical-mission and proclaimed, laughing: “I am proud to announce the bass is liberated.”

We met Stanley Clarke in the backroom of the House of Blues, Cleveland Ohio, before Corea, Clarke and White took the stage. He and Lenny White were relaxing before the show, telling jokes on the couch with empty take-out boxes and 60 Minutes playing on the TV. Stanley was very warm and was happy to share a bit about his life and his hopes for the bass in mainstream music.

When the opportunity to speak with a living legend arrives you try to get as much insight as possible. Clarke’s eloquent responses did not disappoint — a genius teacher passing wisdom and challenges onto the future generations. Clarke identifies with music on a completely different level — when asked about finding his style he said it was more just who he was than a conscious choice:

“I really got into just playing jazz music… My heroes were Miles Davis and all the bass players that played like Mingus, Richard Davis, Ron Carter, Paul Chambers. So that’s kind of a… that music is like a tradition. I don’t look at it so much as a style. It’s more like you ask me if I’m African-American. I’m African-American. The jazz thing is close to that. I wasn’t like ‘well let me see what style am I going to play’. That’s more for now because there’s so many different genres of music that are out there, you know, so you can say well I’m going to be a rock musician, I’m going to be a jazz musician. When I was coming up, I really … I almost didn’t have a choice, it’s just what I did.”

He recalled watching the Rolling Stones on TV when he was 13: “Everybody was having fun except Bill Wyman, who was playing bass and he looked so bored. And I thought ‘what the hell is wrong with him?’ And I said I would never want to be like that.”

He certainly never was. Clarke was very deliberate in his musical career and was not afraid to push the envelope. He was the first person to headline venues as a bass player in modern American music.

“Well, it wasn’t really that easy for me. There were a lot of promoters that would actually hire me to play their place, but they didn’t….To some degree it was slightly illegitimate, meaning, I remember one time I was playing in Indiana, it was after an album I had called Journey to Love and it was like number 30 in the pop charts, you know like a bass player jazz album.

So I went to Indiana to this sold out place — a 2000 seater — and this promoter just said here’s this guy, he didn’t know me from Adam, this guy that sells tickets playing a bass.

So, when I got done, coming off the stage, you’d think that the promoter would say, ‘Man, it was great! You sold this place out, thank you.’ He says, ‘You know, I still don’t believe this.’ You know, it was like something not quite legitimate about it, because I was the only one. A lot of times, when you are the only one, there’s a slight illegitimacy to it, you know, so when you get more… I was happy when Jaco Pastorius came on the scene.

Later, you know, you got the Marcus Millers, the Victor Wootens, and all those types, now it’s more legitimate, you know, real legitimate, you have the bass as a solo instrument, like, it’s like apple pie, and, you know… normal.

Bassists headlining gigs and producing solo albums has certainly become a normal activity. What is not normal is a band reunion where every member has had a successful solo career. Clarke said being back together with Corea and White is just as electrifying — he’s known them since he was 19. Is the chemistry still there?

“Oh yeah,” Clarke says, “because we have a language that we all know. We come from the same root that goes back to you know, Charlie Parker, or even back to Louis Armstrong. It’s like it’s a tree, you know, it’s really there — really strong. It’s hard to explain, but it’s just there and it’s just it.”

Clarke’s mentioned before how physically demanding upright bass is — beautiful, but very cumbersome. There is a lot of adaptation that a player needs to go through to really get inside the instrument and find what works well. His own journey started with classical training:

“Well, you know I was fortunate enough, I had a little tiny Italian bass teacher named Mr. [Eligio] Rossi, and he was probably 2 feet tall. I used to call him my little Roman friend.” Laughing, he continued, “He’s more responsible for me. He just passed away at 95 – a long life, and he was like the greatest teacher.

"First of all, at the time when I was coming up he was training me to be a virtuoso on the bass. He said, ‘we’re going to play solos on the bass’ and even in those days it was uncommon, even in orchestras for African-American bass players to get into the symphony system. He never put that in my head like some other teachers I had. They would just tell me ‘forget it, just do this and don’t do that…’

"But he trained me, you know, I got the same concertos and sonatas as all the other guys, I guess because he felt that I had natural talent or something, he just really spent a lot of time with me. And all the techniques and things, I still use a lot of his techniques. You know, he was a tremendous teacher.”

What is Clarke’s perspective on the bass world as it stands today? Did he expect the bass “explosion” that has occurred in music?

“Well, you know, it’s kind of like with a lot of things, when things expand, and for the first time you never really know what to say or even if you think if it needs to be controlled or needs to be thought about. Let’s put it this way — there are thousands of bass records out.

There are people, you know, they’re like leaders as bass players. Are they all good? No.” Looking at Lenny and laughing he says, “You know you can say the same for drummers that have records,” before adding, “you know, it’s all fine, it’s all moving forward.”

Continuing in that vein we wanted to know who Clarke was listening to now — bassists who he appreciates as a musician.

“Well, some of the bass players I like – Victor Wooten, I think Victor Wooten on the electric bass is like a culmination of a lot of things, you know, all the guys that came before him. He does all that popping, slapping, thumping, double pumping… You know, all that,” he says laughing. “You know, he does it all, and then he’s musical."

He just has to get his compositions together. You know, as he gets older he’ll learn how to write. When you write for the bass you don’t really write for the bass. You just write good music with good melodies and you adapt it to the bass. You know that’s kind of what you do there. Acoustic bass players, I like this Israeli bass player Avishai Cohen.

I like Christian McBride. I don’t like that he’s got his 20 year anniversary, like he’s some old man,” he says with a smile, “he’s still a kid to me.”

Getting back to Clarke’s mission — liberating the bass – he leaves us with the following challenge for the next generation of bass players: “Write good songs.

He passionately continues on what the bass community needs (and it’s not what you think):

“For real, you know, [to] not just rely on the whole popping and slapping stuff. It’s all been overdone. It’s to a point where there’s bass players where that’s all they do. I go on, sometimes as a kick, I’ll go on YouTube, and I’ll see some bass players doing stuff and they’re looking too much at technique, you know, and I feel like I’m a little responsible for that…

"But underneath my technique, you know, is a real… I would like to say it is a real sound musical foundation. I know tunes, I know scales, I know theories, I’m a composer, I can write music, and I can read music, all those important building blocks to becoming a solid musician. I mean, forget being good or bad, just be solid.

Even a very solid bad musician still has to have those foundations. You can write like shit, your melodies can be horrible but at least the guy can write. At least he can put it down on paper, you know?”

As we wrapped things up everyone is preparing to go on stage, for what is going to be an awesome show. What’s on the horizon for Clarke? “Well, I got a new album, more tours, I’m launching a new web site that’s kind of interesting, having to do with education, and you know, just moving forward,” he says.

Moving forward indeed. Clarke continues to be innovative on the bass and will keep pushing our societies musical boundaries with his art. We’ve got his challenge — write good songs — and now we, as bassists, must also move forward with that in mind.

Stanley Clarke - Lopsy Lu

Stanley Clarke - Vulcan Princess

Stanley Clarke& Marcus Miller&Victor Wooten live Vienne France

Herbie Hancock

Herbie Hancock
Herbie Hancock | Source

Herbie Hancock - Rock It LIVE

Herbie Hancock - Hump

Herbie Hancock - Steppin' In It

Herbie Hancock

Herbie Hancock will always be one of the most revered and controversial figures in jazz -- just as his employer/mentor Miles Davis was when he was alive. Unlike Miles, who pressed ahead relentlessly and never looked back until near the very end, Hancock has cut a zigzagging forward path, shuttling between almost every development in electronic and acoustic jazz and R&B over the last third of the 20 century and into the 21st.

Though grounded in Bill Evans and able to absorb blues, funk, gospel, and even modern classical influences, Hancock's piano and keyboard voices are entirely his own, with their own urbane harmonic and complex, earthy rhythmic signatures -- and young pianists cop his licks constantly.

Having studied engineering and professing to love gadgets and buttons, Hancock was perfectly suited for the electronic age; he was one of the earliest champions of the Rhodes electric piano and Hohner clavinet, and would field an ever-growing collection of synthesizers and computers on his electric dates.

Yet his love for the grand piano never waned, and despite his peripatetic activities all around the musical map, his piano style continued to evolve into tougher, ever more complex forms. He is as much at home trading riffs with a smoking funk band as he is communing with a world-class post-bop rhythm section -- and that drives purists on both sides of the fence up the wall.

Having taken up the piano at age seven, Hancock quickly became known as a prodigy, soloing in the first movement of a Mozart piano concerto with the Chicago Symphony at the age of 11. After studies at Grinnell College, Hancock was invited by Donald Byrd in 1961 to join his group in New York City, and before long, Blue Note offered him a solo contract.

His debut album, Takin' Off, took off indeed after Mongo Santamaria covered one of the album's songs, "Watermelon Man."

In May 1963, Miles Davis asked him to join his band in time for the Seven Steps to Heaven sessions, and he remained there for five years, greatly influencing Miles' evolving direction, loosening up his own style, and, upon Miles' suggestion, converting to the Rhodes electric piano.

In that time span, Hancock's solo career also blossomed on Blue Note, pouring forth increasingly sophisticated compositions like "Maiden Voyage," "Cantaloupe Island," "Goodbye to Childhood," and the exquisite "Speak Like a Child."

He also played on many East Coast recording sessions for producer Creed Taylor and provided a groundbreaking score to Michelangelo Antonioni's film Blow Up, which gradually led to further movie assignments.

Having left the Davis band in 1968, Hancock recorded an elegant funk album, Fat Albert Rotunda, and in 1969 formed a sextet that evolved into one of the most exciting, forward-looking jazz-rock groups of the era.

Now deeply immersed in electronics, Hancock added the synthesizer of Patrick Gleeson to his Echoplexed, fuzz-wah-pedaled electric piano and clavinet, and the recordings became spacier and more complex rhythmically and structurally, creating its own corner of the avant-garde.

By 1970, all of the musicians used both English and African names (Herbie's was Mwandishi). Alas, Hancock had to break up the band in 1973 when it ran out of money, and having studied Buddhism, he concluded that his ultimate goal should be to make his audiences happy.

The next step, then, was a terrific funk group whose first album, Head Hunters, with it's Sly Stone-influenced hit single, "Chameleon," became the biggest-selling jazz LP up to that time. Now handling all of the synthesizers himself, Hancock's heavily rhythmic comping often became part of the rhythm section, leavened by interludes of the old urbane harmonies.

Hancock recorded several electric albums of mostly superior quality in the '70s, followed by a wrong turn into disco around the decade's end. In the meantime, Hancock refused to abandon acoustic jazz. After a one-shot reunion of the 1965 Miles Davis Quintet (Hancock, Ron Carter, Tony Williams, Wayne Shorter, with Freddie Hubbard sitting in for Miles) at New York's 1976 Newport Jazz Festival, they went on tour the following year as V.S.O.P.

The near-universal acclaim of the reunions proved that Hancock was still a whale of a pianist; that Miles' loose mid-'60s post-bop direction was far from spent; and that the time for a neo-traditional revival was near, finally bearing fruit in the '80s with Wynton Marsalis and his ilk. V.S.O.P. continued to hold sporadic reunions through 1992, though the death of the indispensable Williams in 1997 cast much doubt as to whether these gatherings would continue.

Hancock continued his chameleonic ways in the '80s: scoring an MTV hit in 1983 with the scratch-driven, proto-industrial single "Rockit" (accompanied by a striking video); launching an exciting partnership with Gambian kora virtuoso Foday Musa Suso that culminated in the swinging 1986 live album Jazz Africa; doing film scores; and playing festivals and tours with the Marsalis brothers, George Benson, Michael Brecker, and many others.

After his 1988 techno-pop album, Perfect Machine, Hancock left Columbia (his label since 1973), signed a contract with Qwest that came to virtually nothing (save for A Tribute to Miles in 1992), and finally made a deal with Polygram in 1994 to record jazz for Verve and release pop albums on Mercury.

Well into a youthful middle age, Hancock's curiosity, versatility, and capacity for growth showed no signs of fading, and in 1998 he issued Gershwin's World. His curiosity with the fusion of electronic music and jazz continued with 2001s Future 2 Future, but he also continued to explore the future of straight-ahead contemporary jazz with 2005s Possibilities.

An intriguing album of jazz treatments of Joni Mitchell compositions called River: The Joni Letters was released in 2007. In 2010 Hancock released his The Imagine Project album, which was recorded in seven countries and featured a host of collaborators, including Dave Matthews, Anoushka Shankar, Jeff Beck, the Chieftains, John Legend, India.Arie, Seal, P!nk, Juanes, Derek Trucks, Susan Tedeschi, Chaka Khan, K'NAAN, Wayne Shorter, James Morrison, and Lisa Hannigan.

He was also named Creative Chair for the New Los Angeles Philharmonic. ~ Richard S. Ginell, Rovi

Herbie Hancock - Hang Up Your Hang Ups

Herbie Hancock - Dis is da drum & Shooz

Herbie Hancock - Juju

Herbie Hancock- Bo Ba Be Da

Herbie Hancock - Vibe Alive

Jazz/Funk and Rare Grooves MasterMixes and Vibes

Jazz Rare Grooves/Vibes Mastermixes
Jazz Rare Grooves/Vibes Mastermixes | Source

The Internet and The Jazz Artist

It seems that online music distribution has become a viable factor in the 2005 mainstream music industry. Most serious musicians recognize the value of having a website these days. Where many of the jazz musicians I know did not even use a computer very much at all, most are now at least using email to announce their gigs. All of the major record labels have pretty cool websites now that allow streaming of songs, buying downloads, and the purchasing of actual CDs online. Most of the major jazz writers, publications, venues and festivals have websites to promote respective offerings and information. All of these developments are very positive for most all jazz artists across the spectrum - signed or unsigned. And it is somewhat amazing, when you consider the fact that all of this has actually been realized in a relatively short period of time. I recall that it was not too long ago that many of my friends were giving me a hard time about using the Internet to promote my music, services and activities. However, I don't get much ribbing these days about my websites. Most musician friends don't necessarily view it as an unproductive waste of time now, especially when those iTunes Music Store and iPod commercials started airing on network television during some major prime time events quite a while back.

MUSIC NOW AVAILABLE AT

So, when did online music and its digital distribution become so cool with the mainstream cats? Well, I believe that the Internet and World Wide Web have just now actually become viable as a business model, more than anything else. Online music and digital distribution have always been pretty cool - at least in concept. But, the real businesses in our industry were relatively slow to warm to the digital realm. I understand such caution as best I can. However, I would have to say that the last two years have been most significant, because it was around the middle part of 2003 when Apple Computer announced selling 150 million songs over their popular online music store. And according to an article that was published at CNet on October 14, 2004, Apple had sold this amazing number of songs within the first six months that the iTunes Music Store was opened back in April of 2003.

Today, sites like Apple's iTunes, Real Network's Rhapsody, Microsoft, eMusic, and Sony's Connect, have proven that people are buying music using this new technology and patronizing those credible companies. Peer-To-Peer networks of the old Napster model have been replaced by these same legit services, which in effect are their own P2Ps within themselves as well. Online music has come a very long way, in a relatively short time. It is here to stay as a means to market and sell digital musical products and other artist services. The coolest thing is that both, independent and major label artists are still able to participate in this platform for distribution. And just think, as early as the beginning of the millennium, it would have been difficult to visualize the current landscape where online music distribution is concerned.

JAZZERS BEWARE

There are still some music sites out there that are not suited to the serious musician, regardless of genre. However, most of those sites are actual remnants from the days of the old free advertising revenue supported MP3 music sites that basically still have no means to develop or maintain a customer base for the artists. It is also a lot easier for a serious artist to discern legitimate opportunities from the numerous other situations that prey upon the ignorance of most jazz musicians where the Internet is concerned. If you visit any online music distribution website where there is no company information to be found, owner contact information is dubious at best, or it looks like your 12 year old neighbor built it and there are no recognizable mainstream artists in your field on the site - uh, it is probably not a good place for a serious musician to trust with their music. The last sentence sounds like common sense, but hey, there are folks still selling those types of situations to musicians today. And, if there is money involved, the artist won't likely see their fair share.

MUSIC NOW AVAILABLE AT

So, when did online music and its digital distribution become so cool with the mainstream cats? Well, I believe that the Internet and World Wide Web have just now actually become viable as a business model, more than anything else. Online music and digital distribution have always been pretty cool - at least in concept. But, the real businesses in our industry were relatively slow to warm to the digital realm. I understand such caution as best I can. However, I would have to say that the last two years have been most significant, because it was around the middle part of 2003 when Apple Computer announced selling 150 million songs over their popular online music store. And according to an article that was published at CNet on October 14, 2004, Apple had sold this amazing number of songs within the first six months that the iTunes Music Store was opened back in April of 2003.

Today, sites like Apple's iTunes, Real Network's Rhapsody, Microsoft, eMusic, and Sony's Connect, have proven that people are buying music using this new technology and patronizing those credible companies. Peer-To-Peer networks of the old Napster model have been replaced by these same legit services, which in effect are their own P2Ps within themselves as well. Online music has come a very long way, in a relatively short time. It is here to stay as a means to market and sell digital musical products and other artist services. The coolest thing is that both, independent and major label artists are still able to participate in this platform for distribution. And just think, as early as the beginning of the millennium, it would have been difficult to visualize the current landscape where online music distribution is concerned.

JAZZERS BEWARE

There are still some music sites out there that are not suited to the serious musician, regardless of genre. However, most of those sites are actual remnants from the days of the old free advertising revenue supported MP3 music sites that basically still have no means to develop or maintain a customer base for the artists. It is also a lot easier for a serious artist to discern legitimate opportunities from the numerous other situations that prey upon the ignorance of most jazz musicians where the Internet is concerned. If you visit any online music distribution website where there is no company information to be found, owner contact information is dubious at best, or it looks like your 12 year old neighbor built it and there are no recognizable mainstream artists in your field on the site - uh, it is probably not a good place for a serious musician to trust with their music. The last sentence sounds like common sense, but hey, there are folks still selling those types of situations to musicians today. And, if there is money involved, the artist won't likely see their fair share.

When I first went online with my music, I mainly wanted to level the field a bit for myself as an independent jazz artist and producer. If I were primarily interested in working as a sideman for other leaders, I wouldn't necessarily even need to own a computer. But, I compose and record my own music, therefore the Internet has helped me significantly. Over time, I soon realized that hooking up with an established major label and having that type of extensive organizational backing was going to be highly unlikely and unrealistic in terms of the type of control that I wanted to have over my own music. Before online music distribution opportunities became viable for serious independent musicians too, I guess I could see some validity to some aspects of the commonly held and various conspiracy theory paradigms that essentially pitted the big record labels against the independent artist communities back then.

STILL NO SHORT CUTS

Today, I realize more fully (and in much clearer context, I must admit too) that an artist has to handle their own business. Whether signed to a label or not. There must be an organizational type of business plan in application. You've got to cover all of the bases for yourself, or hire someone to perform necessary functions related to your music business as a recording artist and leader. Performing live at quality venues is still the key ingredient to a successful jazz career. The Internet is not a short cut around, or substitute for, playing live as much as possible. Having one's music online at iTunes or your own website is also going to provide marginal effect without qualified promotion of your music. The early deceptions I witnessed of the Internet-only artists achieving great success and earning hundreds of thousands of dollars for amassing downloads has been destroyed with the demise of the old MP3.com site. No careers were ever made among strictly online artists'

I simply see that appropriate distinctions are once again drawn - between the serious artist using the Internet as a supplemental marketing tool; and, the hobbyist musician who is mostly interested in simply having their songs up on the web to get feedback. Is this a good thing? The musician in me thinks so, but you never know with the Internet, consumer demographic trends and advances in music delivery technology though. Having exclusive quality controlled sites like iTunes, sure makes things easier for the serious artists to present their work to the online public; and, it is more considerate to serious jazz fans online toward finding established artists and discovering new artists. But, someone simply putting your music into digital distribution without promotion is almost another exercise in futility, due to the enormous amount of music on those sites. Your music may be on iTunes, but who is telling others about it besides you?

THE NEW CREDIBILITY FACTOR

If there is something to watch out for as a serious recording artist with music online these days, I would say it would be the digital distribution deals offered to independent artists. Since this is the "hot ticket" now in online music distribution, it must also be considered that there are likely to be a lot of companies springing up all over the web, who promise to put your music on iTunes, give you free barcodes, etc. Such angles of exploitation have always been with us and never seem to end on the Internet, so watch out. Try to ensure that your digital distributor provides you with a detailed accounting of your earnings, along with a listing of all of the music stores and services where they have placed your music. This is often a difficult proposition with the independent web-based defacto labels who provide this service. Nothing against any of these guys, just good business sense from the musician perspective.

Do the old style free MP3 sites have a purpose? Yes, those types of artist communities actually fill an existing need for some musicians and also serve a marginal purpose for marketing samples of one's work to another segment of the online community. Mainstream online super stores versus tiny independent MP3 sites - are choices that each person must make on their own. I still think that both types of situations are cool, depending upon one's own goals and purposes. However, the delusions of being marginally engaged in an active performing career and still appearing to succeed in the professional arena of music have been hopefully exposed forever for what they are - delusional and online fantasy. There are no short cuts to making a living by creating one's art as a musician. The Internet has helped independent jazz artists like me, but it has not substituted for the work in the real world that I must do each and every day as an artist and composer.

IT IS ALL GOOD

A positive thing happened in online music distribution when experienced businesses such as Apple Computer, along with the major record labels, began to take the Internet seriously. By doing so, these entities brought legitimate business experience and adequate funding to support their online ventures that had been sorely missing. Such established industry and business firms also brought with them, a much needed music consumer confidence. This factor alone has benefited just about every one of us who is directly or indirectly involved in most any aspect of the online music scene. In effect of the major corporations marketing online music, my independent music has benefited as well. More people know that music is available online today, and they are displaying more confidence in doing transactions over the Internet as well.

My website is serving the purpose for which it was developed. However, I don't spend much time online these days because I am more busy doing work away from the web now. And besides, there are still only a few viable jazz places online in the context that I see things now. Visiting the few sites of today does not take as long as managing my affairs at the numerous MP3 sites once did back in the day. So, I am able to spend most of my time now preparing things for what I do offline as a musician. Speaking of which... I got to go practice'

Thanks for reading this article. I am actually quite busy with offline activities as of late - a good thing for a musician. I will write again when I have the time and a musing comes along. Peace, (Chris Burnett)

Jazz/Funk Master-Jams in the Mix!

The following Jazz/Funk tracks below are a a collection of various artists, because there are so many of them, I decided to select those I think I could feature here. There are too many artists left out, and this Hub would not be able to accommodate them all.

What I did, was give the listener/viewer/reader a chance to just play the songs as they see fit and they are specifically setup in a way that one could listen to them continuously without interruption. I will be working on a Volume II of this Jazz Funk and this time I will feature some of the newest artists on the in the decade before and during the Y@K jazz era. There are many fascinating artists that have come up the ranks of jazz in its various genres and I know there are many people who will want to listen to their best tunes. The Vibe and Jazz/Funk below, I hope, will satisfy those who need to have this music put in A Hub like this one, and so that they do not have to look for some of their favorite songs.

The most difficult thing for Huber's like me is that we are using the music of artists to expose them to the world through the Internet. In the case like mine and many other who are posting this music, it is not for material or monetary gain. All is done in the spirit of entertainment and keeping the music of jazz in the forefront of the burgeoning and emerging technologies. This has its pitfalls.

One of the major problems one faces for posting the music of jazz musicians is that it gets taken off due to 'copyright' issues. I understand the issue of copyright if one is using other people's/artist's products(compositions in this case, in order to gain and make a profit out of the music. What really has me perplexed is the fact that there is a roving detector of which I think that is not wrong.

Knowing and given the fat that the music of jazz is no more the 'it' factor' on the music scene, and the reality that there are some of us who are still using the music in order to give the listeners/appreciators a heads up of the music that used to rule the ether, it is also important that, at the least, we be given some leeway to project and post music, not for monetary gains, but to expose the genre of music that is truly struggling to hold its own given the amount of music that is on the YouTube video sites.

There also has to be new ways through which the music of Jazz can be kept alive. Streaming various tunes in a Hub like the one above, is also important in making sure that people remember and have within their listening and appreciating proximity the music that they pine for and would like to see played the viral stream. The Internet is a new medium, and it is full of many problems and good things. One of the good thing that the Internet does for us, through the YouTube videos, is expose us to rare Jazz/Funk grooves that many think or find it very hard to listen to or find.

Here Are some quotes from two great Jazz artists:

I can only hope that one day America will recognize that our indigenous music — jazz — is the heart and soul of all popular music, and that we cannot afford to let its legacy slip into obscurity." — Quincy Jones

“The spirit of jazz is the spirit of openness.” — Herbie Hancock

The role played by this Hub is not to profit, but to entertain and give the reader.viewer/listener another chance or perspective of what their artists have been doing, done and left us in the form of their music. There are still artists that are still recording in their old age and those who are young and upcoming. I believe these need some form of exposure and that shows that some of us still appreciate the genre and the artists, old and young, for their efforts to give us music and make money from their compositions.

The section below is designed to give the music appreciators a chance to listen, non-stop to various artists at their best. Also, it is an effort at trying to mimic the way music of other genres, other than jazz, are being presented to their listeners. I have tried to do this, below, in attempting to give a collection of various artists without interrupting with their bios and photos.

One of my specialities is Media/communications, and I recognize that as the appreciators of Jazz music, need to explore and utilize the music of jazz the best way one can without infringing upon the copyright of the artist. I think I am in total agreement in giving credit to musicians, which I have tried to do in my own paltry way. I have given the music lover the picture of the artist, their short or somewhat lengthy bio, and in the cases of the posted music above, various tracks from artist, that is, the music I think and hear as being one of their best.

Some of the artists' tunes I have selected above are no more played in a regular pattern that they once were. The very artists themselves are no more paid attention to-one finds even grown-up listening to Rap or Hip Hop, and it used to be hip to know these artist, their music and style, and of course, their signatures. Older and grown up people are not yet as Internet savvy as the young people today. So, Hubs like this one can be shared, if found, by those who prowl such sites, and be given to the older people who are deluged with so many genres, either than jazz.

The jazz/funk below might not be the old and classical jazz of yesteryears, but it nonetheless is a bit of respite from the 'sampling' and other types of music that dominate the YouTube world, and it is also important to redirect those who will listen to it, back to jazz, and hopefully, to even older composition of jazz known as classical jazz. I have dubbed the section below as a Mastermix jazz presentation of various artists-and in the process, am bringing up to date some of the latest jazz/sounds that are good in presenting and promoting, if not showing the evolution of jazz. throughout the ages.

As I have said elsewhere in the Hub, I am not going to pretend that this is the best Hub on Jazz music. Far from it. It is only an attempt on my part to present, in a Hub format the music of jazz, and the story of the artists, along with the photos to the music lovers, and in so doing, keeping the memories and music alive in the new technological society, rather than be left out of the musical loop. I do not have any intention to gain from doing so, and will always and also want to see the jazz artist receive the exposure and appreciation they have worked for so hard.

Voices And Opinions From the Jazz appreciators

bostonron writes:

I studied music history in college (Americana, evolution, origins, impact on society (and/or vice versa), etc. A HUGE focus on Jazz, the Blues and Folk).

"Kind If Blue" is not only a top Jazz album for me, but an all time album for me (#1 or #2). Miles drew me into Jazz but it was 1950s NYC Hard Bop that hooked me for life. While Birds material may be short due to a shortened life, it's all quality. The "Earl the Pearl" of Jazz.

Miles, Bird, Monk, Trane, Corea, Herbie (acoustic and electric), Donald Byrd, Bille, my girl Etta James, Marc Ribot (hard to label him Jazz. he's more fusion ), Grant Green, Max Roach, Chet Baker (everyone MUST listen to "White Blues" and his Paris sessions), Dizzy, Louis are some of my many, many favorites (I could go on and on...)

I feel like contemporary jazz is almost like the heavyweight division. It used to be really good. We're all waiting for the next big thing to bring the "genre/sport" back up. And while boxing has MMA to battle against, current Jazz has too much fusion and not enough young artists shooting for that "classic" sound. Contemporary Jazz vocalists are killing it though. Cassandra Wilson comes to mind. This lady has "IT". Lotta soul and love coming out of that woman.

CannedWalrus posted this comment:

Way to mention Ribot - I'd say a guy that prolific qualifies as a part of at least 10 or 12 genres, not just fusion!

What you said about contemporary jazz is difficult to argue with, unless you define contemporary as anything being written and produced at this time. Otherwise I would argue that avant-jazz, especially for bands that utilize a Bitches Brew-esque instrumentation, is in a golden age right now. On that note, progressive downtown stuff is flourishing as well. I would agree, though, that the "classic" technique and timbre is hard to find nowadays. I think that might be a result of the fear jazz artists constantly speak about of being plagiaristic or derivative.

bostonron added:

I guess technically, you're right about contemporary. I use that term (unfairly and ignorant) too often. I got too comfortable using it to describe the one genre of music I truly do not like. And that's contemporary Country (like Jazz, it's a blanket term for the "mainstream" cookie cutter music). Unfortunately, Jazz has a really hard time finding a meaning niche in this department. In a lot of ways, the genre has become a joke. The elevator music, safe, Wynton Marsalis (even though I respect the hell out of him) brand of Jazz (admittedly, I know little about the avant-jazz. Would love for some recs if you could PM me with some artists to check out). It's like, Jazz artists spend so much time trying to pay homage to their heroes. In doing so they create this plastic, generic and flaccid stale Jazz. Like many genres, you gotta be pushing the envelope to create new and exciting music. Which is why I'm drawn to Hard Bop of the 1950s. Guys like Dizzy and Bird blowing hard in after hours clubs, with no audiences, playing to impress each other and for the love. Musicians playing for musicians is what usually creates these hugs musical breakthroughs. One guy I forgot to mention is Cecil (sh*t, I forget his last name), pianist (I'm trying hard not to say Cecil Fielder).

mgh2001 said:

Hold on. You knock today's jazz for not sounding like it did, and then don't enjoy Wyntons work or think it travels down that road of using older timbres and popular New Orleans jazz to swing to bop to fushion techniques...I don't get it is all.

bostonron replied:

my knock on current Jazz isn't that it doesn't sound classic. It's that it doesn't sound like anything. It sounds emotionally empty, cold, dead (general statement). Wynton is probably the most well respected artists artist out there right now. I could (maybe) argue, that while you could probably never put a price on Louis Armstrong contributions (which are immense) Wynton could be the second biggest Jazz voice we've ever had. He's a Pulitzer winner, Lincoln Center regular...he defines class, intelligence, grace and respect. Obviously, I respect the hell out of him. My "beef" with him are as much about my praise too. It's that he is everywhere. He is THE voice for Jazz this generation, but he values paying homage to the past more then he cherishes progressive growth. Like I mentioned, I value and respect his stance to remain "forever classic". But when a genre as rich as Jazz struggles for mainstream acceptance (with real musicians as well as the masses) he seems to advocate stale, generic copycat music then to promote moving Jazz forward. The guy is an amazing musician, highly educated man on the music and comes from a rich family background rooted in the music. You (I) can't dislike him. It's more disappointment with how he's handled being the spokesperson for the genre. He should straddle the line for progressive growth and being true to your heroes, past, etc. Tough thing to achieve, but music as rich as Jazz deserves nothing less then just that.

CannedWalrus replied:

I think your beef is not with the intellect of the music itself (unless you really are irked by sophistication) but with the grandiose pompousness of modern jazz culture. I would argue that the musicians have nothing to do with that, and that the audience is the real culprit in turning the genre into an overly erudite club for music professors and PhD students. When Giant Steps was recorded Coltrane was regarded by many as a musical genius in a very literal sense. To write the augmented modulation is one thing, but to solo cleanly and interestingly over such a progression is astounding. At the time, I am sure many people also regarded this sort of playing as overly intellectual as well.

You mentioned fusion - there is a prime example of an unequivocally intellectual genre. The vast majority of the population would be either vexed or intimidated by a mid-70s McLaughlin recording, and would probably make the very argument you're making about the "unlistenability" of modern jazz, about his admittedly self-indulgent style. But would you let anybody get away with saying McLaughlin isn't a jazz musician? Years have gone by since the fusion heyday and he is now and forever a permanent barnacle on the genre's face.

You also have to consider that you are an American in the 21st century. "Listenability," whatever that means, is essentially subjective. This is a truth that studying ethnomusicology solidifies like nothing else - many Middle Easterners would rather listen to microtonal clusters than to a handsome tonal chorale. Liberians would rather play repetitious 12/8 patterns, which I find off-puttingly awkward, than groove in 4/4 or adventure into asymmetric time. My point is that we tend to grant amnesty to the music that is endemic to our environment, regardless of its potential faults or "listenability."

I don't think that dubbing something as "jazz" has to be arbitrary at all. In fact, I think that as the genre has grown, we've actually become more methodical in terms of pegging a particular piece as part of the jazz realm and another as non-jazz. Most of all, jazz is not dead. It is absolutely still gaining steam and it will continue to. You take issue with the intellect of modern jazz - this argument has existed in music forever, from critics of the Romantic era's grandiloquence, to the audience who chucked trash at the premiere of The Rite of Spring, to the people who felt too musically inferior to enjoy the fusion of the 70s. At some point I think we all become one of these people who are cynical about the art of today, but that does not mean it is dead. Maybe it's just surpassed us.

bostonron elaborated further:

First off, I want to say I am loving this thread. Intelligent musical discussion being had. Different perspectives, theories, thoughts, ideas, all being taken at face value, digested with respectful opinions returned...so on and so forth. I have a ton I would like to add but it's late and I'm on my phone getting ready for some sleep. I will touch upon something someone above commented about Jazz being a bit of a pompous elite country club. I have to agree to some extent with that. Serious Jazz heads can be difficult to discuss music with. Students of the genre can sometimes get way too defensive (I'm not saying anyone here is acting like this. Just a general statement) with strong opinions, and a very protective attitude towards musicians they are fond of. This makes having intelligent discussions difficult because you can't have a decent conversation with people like this. I feel like this is a tone that has "plagued" the scene probably since the very beginning. Look, it's no secret Jazz musicians are among the most musical of all genres (classical being the only ones I can think that can rival them. But even with the rich history European classical has, it is extremely limited to strict composition. Jazz uses compositions but with the twist of added improvisation (the spine of good Jazz). With that kind of educated musician, you're gonna come across people with strong opinions. Opinions are great. It's the lack of ability to see things from others perspective that creates problems. My point being, Jazz has always had this "us vs them" mentality. What's truly ironic is within this secret club of Jazz musicians there is a lot of in fighting (passive aggressive). A rolling of the eyes back stabbing type of passive aggressive in fighting. It must be disconcerting to outsiders to venture into the genre and see this first hand. Solidarity when others are watching, especially when the genre has been in trouble for 30+ years, should be more important then it has been. I think that tone that has been set creates an uncomfortable atmosphere right off the rip. Simply put, because Jazz is so difficult to play, being a Jazz musician, more so in the '40s-'50s, you were automatically considered a fringe musician (I don't mean fringe as in not good enough to play with other. But Jazz musicians play with other Jazz musicians. Period. Country artists play with mainstream pop stars. Hip hop merges with metal. Jazz musicians play with other Jazz musicians exclusively because no one else can keep up with them. All of these points has Jazz on an island, alone. That type of natural segregation must breed contempt, for other musicians as well as outsiders. None of this makes it any easier to understand the genre. In fact, it pushes people away.

w-axbanks added this point:

@CannedWalrus stated: "the vast majority of people from those generations do not have any connection with jazz. I'm talking very few actually know, understand, or appreciate vey much about it. Sure, there are some people who probably listen to Sinatra or Jamie Cullum or someone comparable (no slight to those musicians) occasionally, but not very many people actually care and explore the genre. They don't care because the music isn't aimed at them. It's aimed at other performers."

i agree with the overall sentiment here but disagree with the last sentence. there's plenty of cerebral jazz, but there's plenty of filthy late-night swing too. and there is an audience for contemporary jazz; it's just...

* tiny
* old
* generally into jazz as *distinct* from (danceable) contemporary music, so edging toward the pop/rock/hiphop 'mainstream' isn't likely to play well w/paying jazz audiences
* wealthy
* foreign

that last is a big deal, actually. there's a festival circuit in europe that keeps jazz bands in suits and bourbon, but there's no comparable support over here. it sucks.

wynton marsalis, by the way, is living proof that crowds will come out to see name jazz players -- they just won't come out to see NEW jazz. support for young musicians means having a circuit of venues and audiences who'll take a chance on no-name players...but there isn't one of those for jazz, anymore. doesn't really matter WHAT they're playing. marsalis didn't turn jazz into Nostalgia Corner.

without institutions -- not academic ones, the kind that serve drinks and encourage f***ing -- willing to book jazz bands and do some of the work of getting people to see them, jazz won't ever again be a living popular art. (spoiler: this will never again happen. it's protools or jazz, basically.) a really burning small group couldn't show up here in boston and find a living jazz scene to plug into, and it's goddamn boston!

bostonron commented:

@waxbank brings up and interesting point. Whether Jazz is "dead" (of which I fully disagree with. It is certainly a lull period. But no art will remain forever dead. Art lives, infinitely) because of the audience. Not the content. I think this raises and interesting "chicken before the egg" question.

(disclaimer: I do not believe Jazz is dead. My language here is strictly for discussion purposes)

Is Jazz dead because there is no audience? Or is there no audience because the content sucks? It's a simple "does environment affect humans or vice versa" argument. But with a complex answer.

I think both questions/answers feed off each other. Like all peaks and valleys, content within the music began to suffer, thus losing the audience. You can find an audience for just about anything these days. Absolutely anything. The problem may lie in Jazzs ability to market itself (which has proven difficult). The very nature of Jazz, to be a secret elitists club, leaves the genre vulnerable to alienation. What seems to prolong this massive drought would be the lack of ability to self sustain. Wynton has been brought up a lot in this thread (of which I'm guilty of), and this may seem like a contradiction to some of my earlier comments, but some credit should be given to him for taking the reigns and trying to salvage the genre. Whether there was someone in wait ready to do so before Wynton did so will forever remain a mystery. He stepped up. And for better or worse, it would seem that the genre is squarely on his shoulders. While I think he could have done more to push for more progressive music (or at least endorse those that do) at least he is holding onto the roots (like an old man clinging to life on his death bed) and educating a generation or two in the process. Modern Jazz is indeed watered down, to an almost non existent substance. We will never know where the genre would be if he hadn't stepped up (also, his motives for stepping up should be questioned. Was it for love of the music, or love of himself and his families name? A little of both, perhaps...)

Then again, there is always the possibility that Jazz was dying anyway. With music taking so many twists and turns the last 2 or 3 decades, the movement towards a more sterilized music is the antithesis to what Jazz really is. Teh Blues has certainly declined over the last 30 years. I think what's kept the Blues relevant is it's relationship to modern Rock music (which seems to be dying as well). Modern Bluesman like Clapton, BB King, Robert Cray are alive and well in Americas sights. They appear in commercials, television shows, movies. There are countless music specials documenting these guys and, you guess it, their relationship to rock and roll. People fail to realize (or refuse to admit) that Jazz is a direct offshoot of the Blues, in America, and relatively speaking, not that long ago. One problem is that Jazz makes you work for that love. It's not an easy music to play, listen to or follow. You either "get" the Blues, or you don't. And while this may be generalizing on a grand scale, you basically have two type of Blues: Delta (acoustic) and Chicago (electric). Jazz has many more sub genres. Someone new to Jazz may not be able to tell the difference between west coast cool and NYC hard bop. The you start getting into dissonance, avant garde Jazz and intense fusion...that's a whole lot harder to understand then Huddie Leddbetters 12 string vs Muddys growling voice and simple electric licks.

I can't help but get on these rambling rants on this subject. I wanted to touch on how music education in schools could actually reverse this horrible trend, and possibly inject some new found love and energy into a "dying" genre. But that's an entirely different "rant".

i'm leaving aside the deeper cultural question of how you connect with a mass audience without shared vocabulary -- e.g. a library of popular songs, or shared teenage experience of picking up an instrument and trying to do what the players onstage are doing (to find out yes, you could play rock or blues, but no you couldn't play bop)...


leaving aside, too, the fact that you can't walk down a city street listening to jazz on over-the-ear headphones (the ambient noise alone destroys any subtle colours in the music), but hip hop was practically born for that setting, so in a pure logistical clash, less informationally dense music will always win...

so yes, it's over. jazz will never again be a mass art form, but it's not because of the content of the music, it's that there's nowhere in the wider culture for the music to go. sucks.

There is more to this type of discourse and discussions in the Jazz world and those who appreciate Jazz. That is why I did not want to go int the rigmaroles of what is true jazz and so forth. I know one thing for sure, it is the feeling that is engendered by jazz that makes me listen to it in all its outlays and jazz genres. What I have presented here, is for entertainment, not discussion. I think the read/listener/ viewer can make up their minds about the music above, and the one in the JazzMixJams below. I went for the simplest thing that jazz is capable of bringing out: Feeling the Feel for Jazz. Hope the rest is just talk- but let us let the music evolve and play on so as to reach new peoples and audiences.

Ralph McDonald

Ramsey Lewis - Sub dude

Ronnie Laws - Always there

Spyro Gyra - Havana Moonlight

The Crusaders - Dont let it get you down.

Ramsey Lewis - Intimacy (Full Version)

Leon Spencer - Where I'm Coming From

Ramsey Lewis - Tequila Mockingbird (1976)

Jimmy SMITH "Oh, No, Babe" (1965)

Billy Paul - War Of The Gods

The Three Sounds - Repeat After Me

Andy Narell - Lift It Up

Wes Montgomery

Miles Davis - Live At the Isle Of Wight Festival (!979) ~ "Call It Anything..

Down to the Bone - Staten Island Groove

Jimmy Smith - The Organ Grinders

Hiroshim - One Wish

Andy Narell - Canboulay

Andy Narell - Chakalaka

Stanley Clarke- passenger 57 - At Movies

Eddie Harris and Les McCann - Set Us Free

Hiroshima - "Midtown Hagashi/East

Ralph McDonald - Jam On The Groove

Lee Oscar - Our road (Also aka "Now That It feels so Good, Tell Everybody") - 1980

The Impact of the Global Digital Music Economy on the Music Business Paradigm

The Office of National Statistics said more Britons now use MP3s than the once-popular personal CD player. Dixons, a chain of electronics stores, said it sold an MP3 player every three seconds last Christmas season. "The MP3 player has become the default amongst music devices," said Hamish Thompson, a Dixons spokesman. "It is definitely the format of the future." The statistics office also added flat-screen televisions, digital camcorders and Internet music downloads to its "shopping basket" of goods.

These types of advances in the area of multi-media entertainment products will continue for quite some time also. For example, most products related to Digital Music (from the music files to the portable media players) are now so first-rate that every serious entity engaged in the retail or commercial aspects of the recorded music sales business, offers digital products along with their sale and distribution of physical music CDs or DVDs. Even the notion of hardcore jazz collectors using an MP3 audio device to play (and archive) their music collections is a consideration that likely exists more commonly today too. So, the Global Digital Music Economy is the defacto standard being used to develop the various modern business models in our industry. It is also safe to say that most music business plans include a digital distribution and sales division as a matter of course these days...

As artists, we now live in the time of unprecedented equal access to the music product consumer market place. This is due to the developments in Internet and eCommerce related technologies. The empowerment potential is truly unlimited for thousands of first-rate artists whose work might otherwise go undocumented, unconsidered, or unnoticed by jazz fans, if not for the new music business and distribution models which we use today.

So, despite all of the advances in producing recordings relatively inexpensively, and then having access to the global market place toward delivering the music to our fans; it is still relatively easy for the typical jazz artist to get "ripped off by another business. The problem with B2B eCommerce dealings is that there is no way for any artist (who is content provider) to actually audit sales done digitally.

If you sell a CD at a live show or at a local record store using some type of consignment arrangement, there is no doubt about the transparency of the retail flow throughout the life of such transactions. You do not have such comforts with digital eCommerce business dealings. You have to take the word of whoever collected the money first from the customer.

It is only logical that the various businesses engaged in digital distribution also be regulated and required to apply and qualify for a license like any other legitimate business does. Any formal digital distribution service agreements (verbal or written) offered and accepted should be legally binding, and finally, there should also be an actual conduct of periodic accounting audits that occur to ensure that all monies are being distributed properly.

As it stands now at this original writing of March 22, 2006, there is no way for an independent jazz artist to "audit most of the firms who digitally distribute music. Some may think the above sentences of requirements are harsh. However, the reality in most cases is that there is no way to audit most digital distributors. Any Digital Distributors (or firm that an artist relies upon to sell digital content through an eCommerce system) can tell you that you sold music or you did not. It is up to them to decide whether or not to be honest because you can't check up on them as things stand at this writing... (Chris Burnett)

Jazz In Retrospect - Jazz Today - Just Jazz

The Hub above does not purport to be the ultimate presentation of jazz as genre. That would be very presumptuous of to think or say so. What it is is a Hub that is for those who love music and appreciate it as I do. I have composed the Hub above in order to meet the challenging need that jazz is no more viewed as a musical form that is very important. It is important and it is evolving as the times and technology change, too.

It has been now several years that I have been prowling around the YouTube videos, and one of the things that I like doing is reading the comments of the listeners. It is worth noting that there are still people out there who still love and appreciate jazz. For some it brings back memories of times long gone. Others it is a great discovery of the songs or music that they thought they would never hear again. To some it brings back memories of their fathers, mothers, friends, and relative. In many cases some get to relieve the festivals, clubs and setting where they first heard, seen or participated in the presentation of the music, or part of the crowd in the music session.

So that, having read so many comments from many people all over the world, it is apparent that Jazz, because of the Internet and YouTube, has reached, the old cats who appreciate the music, the new crowd that is rediscovering the music they heard as children, and also, it is also important because it advances, the Internet and the YouTube videos, the jazz musical genres. Some of the comments are from people who know the music from hearing it from being sampled by many artist in the Hip Hop genres. This has made them to be sent to or recommended to listen to the original artist, and they further hare it with their groups or friends.

The Hub above does not give the many artists that are out there in the jazz world, but it is a start. It is a start whereby the the bios of the artists are given, and interpretation as to what the music meant for the people of South Africa during the hell days of Apartheid. But today, it is a musical genre that is being celebrated. I stated by giving those artist of old and as the Hub progressed and ended, those artists that came up in the 1970s to the Y2K era. This Hub, in all its shortcomings, is one way in which we can celebrate and revive the jazz music that so many people are worried is dead or irrelevant. It is not dead and it is still relevant, although it has morphed into many other genre. It still has classical jazz artists who are young, neo-jazz players and Funk. Soul and what had come to be known as Jazz Fusion in it.

My hope is that many people who discover this Hub will tap, dance and revel in the beats, vibes and grooves that the selected tunes above bring to the listener/viwer. Jazz appreciation is important and I grew up as a very serious listener to different types of artist playing their jazz interpretation. This is why I have written/composed this Hub,just for pure enjoyment, and nothing else. Just like in the jackets of the Vinyls/CD covers, where-in we would find the date of the music when it was composed, we were also given the life history of the artist/band in order for us to know something about the artist we were listening to and how, if possible, they made the composition of their music possible. The Hub above follows in the same vein and rhythm.

Like I said, this is not an ultimate creation of a Jazz Hub, but the hope is that it will entertain and edify the lovers of Jazz music wherein they can find some of the artists that made our days and times. Towards the end of the Hub I present a stream and string of songs so as to give a sense of uninterrupted and easy listening to the music that so many people love and would love to see more "Likes" of it on the Hub ad more comments from various people that come to listen to the Jazz. My hope is that those who listen to this Jazz Musical Hub, wiil find it not wanting, but very satisfying and entertaining, and hope this carries over into the next millenium. Enjoy...

Rodney Franklin - The Groove

Just Jazz - That's The Bottom Line

The problem with Jazz today is that there are people who talk too much about the past Classical Jazz as heir domain and the "Main Jazz Music> Well, I differ and I say, that is why Jazz is lacking in so many ways as an art that is reaching out to the new audiences around the world. I believe that which is sweet to the ear and is played by artists we 'all' call Jazz musicians or 'Jazz Artists'.

What really irks me, it is those who appreciate Jazz that are the loudest critics of the various forms of jazz music as it is presented by different Jazz Artists. I love Bebop; I love Big Bands; in fact, I am an ardent follower of Miles, who dismissed these artists and did his thing. Miles unchained the music from the decrepit chains that held it back, and played to all audiences in different sounds. He was harshly criticized for that, but he did not give a rats ass about all that. He played, and if one listens to all the music his critics criticized him for, it is some of the best and most progressives sounds of Jazz today.

What I like about the music I have presented above is that the musicians have no hangups that the 'jazz-appreciators' are hollering about. I still buy and do not download Jazz music. I use YouTube because I consider the fact that the music I chose to showcase will serve as an advert for the musicians and their skills and art. I like the article that was written by CappitalBop below:

"The droplets of sweat congeal on my forehead. Nervous chuckles spill out with every uncomfortably spot-on observation. With Linnean precision and Dowdian snark, the column before me, written by Nate Chinen of Jazz Times, is characterizing, or perhaps rather caricaturing, a particular type of music fan — a new species, if you will. His subject is the “jazzbro,” what Chinen describes as “a self-styled jazz aficionado, overwhelmingly male and usually a musician in training himself, who expresses a handful of determinative social behaviors.”

“Oh God,” I think to myself. “I’m not one of those, am I?”

First, am I jazz aficionado? Look above this column, which is published on a website devoted to jazz coverage, and you’ll see a pencil sketch of my face. So the answer is probably yes. I also possess a Y chromosome and pursue music in a more-than-a-hobby-but-less-than-a-career sort of way. Things aren’t looking good at first glance.

Maybe a saving grace lies among the “determinative social behaviors” that identify the jazzbro. First, let’s talk about how Chinen reports that surveyed specimens vocalize their appreciation in a live jazz setting. Apparently, the jazzbro’s distinctive call is an enthusiastic cry of “Wooooo!,” made at certain climactic moments during a performance. Overuse of the word “killing” is also a readily detected trait. In my defense, I tend to drop the “g” when I use “killing” in a jazz context, but I don’t think the jury would find that to be a persuasive argument. Sigh. Guilty as charged on both counts, your honor.

There are other behavioral traits that are associated with the jazzbro, of which complicated handshakes are one. My question for Chinen is whether my guy greeting of choice, the “bro hug” falls into this rubric. Probably so, if for no other reason than reoccurrence of the term “bro” in the classification. Chinen says that other activities may include — but are apparently not limited to — drinking beer, attending parties, occasional social awkwardness and sometimes displaying elitist qualities. Check. Check. Check. And there are few things more bourgie than arts commentary or criticism, so check.

I continue to peruse the article, finding a couple lifelines to keep myself afloat among the ever-more-treacherous waves of bro-dom. Most promising is that I am a few years past Chinen’s key demographic of 18 to 34, which is the same rationale Chinen uses to grant himself a reprieve.

However, jazzbro is a state of mind, not a number, so my relief is short-lived. The mindset includes a feeling of general superiority, concurrent with a perceived marginalization from the mainstream. I challenge anyone to put two or more jazz-knowledgeable people in a conversation without both these sentiments rising to the surface. There is also a distinction drawn between the jazzbro and the jazz nerd, a term given short shrift in the article when it comes to appropriate descriptors. An earnest and inward-looking mental state is the key quality that puts the jazz nerd in a separate category. That’s not specific enough for me – I need more to feel certain that I’m not just another dude in brown flip flops (those seeking to learn more about the jazz nerd should make it a point to see this funny but biting video by Jason Marsalis).

But wait! According to Chinen’s research, in order to be a jazzbro, one must first be, well, a bro. To verify whether or not I’m a bro, we turn to the expertise of NPR’s Code Switch blog. The Bro-Map is a handy-dandy and downright ingenious tool that the writers developed to identify bros. There are four categories in the venn diagram of bro-ness: stonerish, dude-ish, preppy, and jocky. Maybe two of these categories apply to me – I’m emphasizing maybe here, people – though I’ll refrain from stating which ones. I even conducted a highly scientific survey on Facebook (response sample size: one) to corroborate my hypothesis. Conclusion: I’m not a bro and therefore, not a jazzbro. There it is, my friends. I’m free and this is my ticket home.

All that said, it absolutely does not matter if I or anyone else is labeled a jazzbro. Members of the jazz community are quick to navel-gaze, whine, and otherwise lament the lack of jazz listeners. Making fun of people that are paying good money to see live jazz because they don’t meet some arbitrary notion of coolness not only seems hypocritical, but also counterproductive. Plus, we’re not talking about dilettantes here. If the jazzbro is a student of music, there are few better classrooms than the jazz club. Even if we are talking about audiences who are merely curious, no law exists that says music should be limited to only Serious Listeners.

Chinen spends more than a few words talking about hipsters. Like bros, they are the butt of many jokes nowadays, yet this culture that came out of Brooklyn has produced some amazing indie sounds over the past decade. No one should discount the music because of a distaste for skinny jeans, facial hair or sleeve tattoos. During my high school years, I had no business wearing flannel, yet wear it I did. Authenticity was totally absent but that doesn’t change the fact that Pearl Jam’s Ten or Soundgarden’s Superunknown will be spinning on my mental jukebox for the rest of my years.

Even though Chinen was likely just being comical, there’s an undercurrent there that disturbs me. There’s no reason to be dismissive of people who simply enjoy music and show their affection for it. So jazzbros, unite! The next time I see you at a club, not only do you have my full permission to “Wooo!” to your heart’s content, but I will also join you in solidarity."

I agree very much with the last point made by CapitalBop that there is seriously no need to or reason for people to be dismissive of the music that is known asJazz, no matter its format or Jazz genre, because, if Jazz has to be alive again, it needs to be lauded and encouraged in every which format or style it is played in. I like what George Coles had to say on this particular point:

"The first thing to say is that whenever Miles moved into a new era of music, he was always criticised by fans and critics who wanted him to continue playing the style of music they loved, so this was nothing new. Some felt that Miles was no longer the innovator he once was and to some degree, they were right. The period from 1964-1975 was incredible in terms of Miles's creativity but you have to remember that Miles was younger, healthier, at the peak of his powers and the climate for musical change and innovation was at its zenith. In the 1980s, Miles was older, his health deteriorated and the music industry was more conservative. But Miles never stopped changing or challenging his listeners. He remained musically curious until the day he died and always had open ears to all forms of music. Some say the music of the 1980s will not be as long lasting as that from other periods, but I disagree. Some of Miles's most memorable music was produced in the 1980s and in time, many critics will finally catch up with it, just as they are now doing with the music from the 1970s.

"First of all, Miles's music was always changing. If you listen to an album like Kind Of Blue (recorded in 1959), and then, On The Corner (from 1972), it's hard to believe that the same artist produced both albums. So in that sense, Miles's 1980s music was no different from what he did in earlier periods. But in terms of style, then there was a big difference. You have to remember that Miles more or less dropped out of the music scene between late 1975 and early 1980 - as far as we know, he only stepped into the recording studio once between 1977 and 1980. The music Miles made in the last ten years was more accessible in the sense that much of it followed the traditional music structure of theme-solo-theme, whereas the music just prior to his layoff was often dense, abstract and seamless - listen to the album Agharta and you'll hear what I mean.

Miles's first album of the 1980s, The Man With The Horn, even contained a disco-funk track "Shout" and a pop ballad with vocals (the title track). From the mid-1980s, there was an even bigger shift towards a more commercial sound with albums like Tutu and You're Under Arrest. During the 1980s, Miles also recorded with a number of soul, pop and rock acts including, Prince, Cameo, Chaka Khan, Toto and Scritti Politti."

Below I will showcase some of this music by Miles Davis that Critics felt is no more Jazz and an innovative Miles.

Miles Davis - Jojo - Arsenio Hall Show - w/ Interview - 1989

Miles Davis - E.S.P.

Miles Davis - On The Corner (Full CD)

Miles Davis 'Star People' Concert - Full length.

Miles Davis - Bitches Brew

For The Love Of The Music Of Jazz/Funk

I opened the diatribe above about Jazz with music from one of my favorite artists, Rodney Franklin, and now I a am going to jam right throughout the Hub of this Jazz Fiesta by starting with the Grove of the name "Fiesta" by Rodney Franklin.

Up to this point in my life listening to Jazz, and the years I have been doing it have accumulated to many generations over half-a-century-plus, I really listen to Jazz for the pure magnificence and beauty of the music the musicians give to us. Many artists, especially Jazz musicians, collaborate with so many artists, that I think in my time, whilst on earth, I will make sure that I enjoy music, and forget about this whole stiff-necked approach to over-analyzing music. I want to enjoy, dance, hum-along, sing, and do anything that the music prods in my musical soul/spirit and appreciation mode and mood. I hope all will enjoy the following Master Jam/Jazz-Funk and let the soul rejoice. Come to think of it: life is too short-and more time should at least be spent enjoying it and finding happiness in all what it has to offer. And music is one hell of a vehicle to do just that. Rashid Booker writes:

"What Is So-Called Jazz ?"

"It's no secret that jazz music started in the black ghettos of New Orleans at the end of the 19th century. In the 1920s jazz moved up river to Chicago and New York as African Americans migrated north in search of a better life."

What is so-called jazz ? According Wynton Marsalis jazz is music that swings. According to Pat Metheny jazz is not the music of Kenny G. According to Webster's jazz is characterized by propulsive syncopated rhythms, polyphonic ensemble playing, varying degrees of improvisation, and often deliberate distortions of pitch and timbre. Personally, I prefer the definition found in the old musician's joke about jazz being "better than sex, and it lasts longer."

Certainly, the question is a highly subjective one. Ask 100 different people "What is jazz?" and you're likely to get 100 different answers. The debate becomes even more confusing given the fact that the history of jazz is relatively well documented.

It's no secret that jazz music started in the black ghettos of New Orleans at the end of the 19th century. In the 1920s jazz moved up river to Chicago and New York as African Americans migrated north in search of a better life.

The 1930s saw the evolution of swing bands like those lead by Duke Ellington and Count Basie. At the same time great soloists emerged, virtuosi like Louis Armstrong, Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young. In the 1940s be bop hit, personified in the music of Charlie Parker. The Mozart of his day, Bird took all of the melodic and harmonic information available and crystallized it into bebop. But, even in 1955, at the time of Bird's death, most people could answer with confidence when asked, "What is jazz?"

Why then, less than half a century later, can't we agree on a working definition? Part of the reason is because jazz has always been and remains today a living art form, ever changing and ever growing. Subsequently, after Bird took bebop to its logical conclusion, musicians like Miles Davis and Ornette Coleman invented new forms like modal playing and "free" jazz. In the 1960s musicians began incorporating R&B, rock and new electric instruments into their jazz. John Coltrane gave us "sheets of sound." The Modern Jazz Quartet mixed jazz and classical music. Everything exploded and suddenly jazz was all over the place.
In their effort to market these musical voyages, major record companies have added to the mystification, bombarding us with labels to ponder: Contemporary jazz, mainstream jazz, smooth jazz, alternative jazz, avant-garde jazz, Latin jazz, fusion, etc. At present, it seems that there are almost as many names for jazz as there are jazz groups. Still puzzled? Me too.

But not worried. Once again, each one of us is left with our own purely subjective views on jazz. My guess is that, if asked, even musicians - the men and women who are currently dedicating their life to creating this music - would likely disagree on the meaning of jazz.

So perhaps a better question is: What do you like? From Jelly Roll Morton to Lee Morgan, from James P. Johnson to John Zorn, the answer is out there, preserved on record for our learning and listening pleasure. Yes, experiencing all the different styles of jazz is a daunting task, but the rewards are great; and the more you listen, the more you'll find similarities within the styles. What's more, jazz elements can be heard outside of its own genre - in rock, R&B, Latin music, African music - the list is endless.
Yet, one thing is sure: Jazz remains America's only original living art form. Today, its influence envelops the globe. It's expressive. It's enriching. Call it what you like -So-Called Jazz is here to stay." Miles Davis said, "Call It Anything."

Rodney Franklin - Fiesta

Rachelle Ferrell - Live in Montreux 1997 - Welcome to my Love

Maceo Parker - Children's World (long version)

Andy Narell - Chocolate Fog hsmarlon·131 videos

Donald Byrd - Change [Makes You Wanna Hustle]

Eric Gale - Ginseng Woman (1977)

Jazz is appreciated in different parts of the world in many ways, and American jazz is in the forefront of tis musical impact globally. From the standpoint and exposure of jazz I received and learned from South Africa, jazz is American, South African, African and global in nature, form and manifestation. All the politics and gossip, history and performance involved in appreciating or listening to it, it has its on quaint characteristic which conform to the dictates of different societies and so on. But one thing i s certain, the influence jazz and the artist who play it have affected thus far in the musical sphere and environment of many peoples globally is that it affect us in many different but same ways.

After the discourse above above views and the politics of Jazz, I would like to give a much more in-depth and very sobering assessment of the craft, but the Music Historian named Ashley Khan.

Jazz Legends and Icons

Miles Davis
Miles Davis
John Coltrane
John Coltrane

Ashely Kahn Talks Jazz

In this exclusive recent conversation with iRock Jazz, Khan shares some of his insights on Davis and Coltrane. He also uses his studies on these pioneers as the foundation for a far-reaching discussion of the state of jazz today.

iRJ: Having done both books, one on Miles and one on Coltrane, how would you now define jazz, based off of those and what you know of the industry at large?

AK: That’s a big question. Jazz is one of those things that defines itself. If a performer, a composer, a bandleader, a record label, anyone wants to define themselves as jazz, usually it’s jazz, because it’s not something that people are running towards. It’s a special kind of music. Of course, it’s defined in a big part by the tradition and legacy that gave birth to it: very serious African-American roots, the blues, the role of improvisation. But I think, for me, the big three are the ideals that you could say are kind of the self-defining ideals of jazz, and that is a balance of tradition, innovation, and individual voice.

And if you think about other musical styles, the balance—especially tradition versus innovation—is different. When you think about music like hip-hop, there’s some amazing music that I grew up with that I just absolutely adored. But, except for Run-DMC, that’s not a style of music that cares too much about who was doing music in the Eighties, whereas classical music is all about tradition and very little about the innovation. So if you’re a 20th-century or 21st-century composer in classical music, good luck trying to go up against Mozart, Beethovenand Bach.

So that’s a very long answer to your short question, but I think that’s a way of defining jazz. When I teach it at NYU, I definitely push this idea of the ideals of jazz and how it helps define what the music is.

iRJ: In doing your research on John Coltrane, what were some of the most unique finds that you were surprised about?

AK: I wouldn’t say “surprised” so much as kind of “heartened” to realize that there really is a kind of cultish reverence for John Coltrane, and I think people would admit it themselves. His sound is so compelling that you can still hear the echoes and resonance of the Coltrane approach to saxophone today on any given night at any club. His story of the dedicated—I mean supremely dedicated—artistic individual, tied in with the spiritual aspect—a very deep, deep sense of universality: All of this adds up to a sort of messianic [chuckle] kind of cult figure.

To realize that he was a guy who had his feet on the ground, who was putting food on the table for his family, who was negotiating business deals, who realized the value of his name, that he was getting popular, that he could renegotiate a contract with a record company, all of a sudden he sounds like jazz cats that I know now and get to talk with all of the time. He was a regular individual who realized his value and was trying to do what was best. He was actually thinking about starting a studio in his home out in Dix Hills [N.Y.], and he actually began that process. He was beginning the process of launching his own record company and having his own record label: Coltrane Records. All the same kind of motivators, the stuff that’s happening today. So he was very much a visionary, yet going through the same paces that today’s jazz musicians are going through. That was a surprise, just getting to kind of respect and revere the guy as a three-dimensional human.

iRJ: With regard to Miles, how close was he related personality-wise and drive-wise to Coltrane, and how different were they?


AK: Well, they were different people, different individuals who had a very different approach to how they did music and how they felt about their career. You just have to open up Miles’s book [Autobiography] to see the way he describesColtrane. He says Coltrane was 100 percent music, that a woman could walk past him with no clothes on while he was practicing and he would not be distracted. And that’s pretty dead on. There was almost an OCD quality in how Coltrane was with music. And Miles was Mr. Super-Cool about it. Showing enthusiasm was kind of the opposite of the cool aesthetic, and even when Miles was doing fusion or rock or funk-influenced music he was still a very cool customer.

iRJ: Hip-hop guys have been able to monetize in a way in which jazz musicians have not. They’re able to succeed in business, they’re in movies. So what happened to the jazz musicians, because it all started with them?

AK: First of all, if you take the long view, the historical view, the hip-hoppers did not invent the idea of monetizing one’s ability to use music, especially popular music. It just happens that we live in a very hip-hop, hard-rocking era right now, and that’s the kind of music that’s getting the attention and getting the funding. But that’s always the case. Styles change, and where the money flows in the music world changes.

But think about the business ventures that African-American musicians have been able to create and monetize their own careers. You know, go back to the Seventies and think about Isaac Hayes. There was a time that he was looked upon as having created this incredible empire of money-making. Before that,Berry Gordy; before that, Ray Charles—Ray Charles owning his own masters—and James Brown. And then you look back further, in what we would call jazz, and you’ve got bandleaders like Lionel Hamptonand Cab Calloway who are pretty much recording themselves and running their own businesses. The way that they ran their bands, there was a lot of monetizing going on way back then too. And there was a lot of economic independence and control that was being asserted.

So what we’re describing here is the number of zeros more so than the idea of why can’t jazz do this. If there was that much money coming in, we’d be praising jazz guys the way we talk about Jay-Z. But, when you think about it, what I just described about Coltrane’s efforts at creating a sort of economic independence for himself, creating a nest egg for his family, et cetera, it’s the same motivation, the same issue of “what else can I do to change the system to make it work better for myself as an artist and the kind of economic support that I need to create my music?”

iRJ: I talked with Robert Glasper some time ago, and he said that in making new music today he felt as though he was always competing with some past great. So when he makes new music, he’s always bumped off the top of the charts when they reissue another John Coltrane or Miles set, and this groove only happens in jazz . Do you think it’s fair that new musicians compositions compete with reissues from these past greats?

AK: Well, listen, if Robert Glasper says it’s there, it’s there. And if you open up Billboard and you believe the numbers that are in Billboard, and you see that Kind of Blue is still selling 2,000 physical units a week or whatever it does, then I can’t argue with that. And if you go to jazz festivals and you see that a Milestribute draws a packed house whereas a new set of artists—Christian Scott, Ambrose Akinmusire, et cetera—is having trouble with the same venue just playing their own music, I would say, “Absolutely.”

But, like I said earlier, jazz is a music that is trying to work out a balance—and, at its best, it does work out that balance—between tradition and innovation. When an artist gets up there and suddenly pulls out aDuke Ellington ballad and there’s that spark of familiarity, there’s a sense of connection to the jazz history, to its legacy, that cannot be denied. And I think this is all part and parcel of the same kind of impetus within jazz to look back and celebrate the history. It’s like driving forward while keeping at least one eye on the rearview mirror. It’s something that you’ve got to work out.

Is it there? Absolutely! But do we want innovation? Do we want to be celebrating new heroes as well? Look at someone like Esperanza Spalding—or Robert Glasper, getting the Grammy for R&B album of the year. There is this idea that there is a new generation all the time, taking it forward. Does it create competition for new artists, where they’re not only competing with their colleagues and other people who are out there but also the sense of history? Absolutely! But it ain’t like classical music. There’s a lot more room for new in jazz than in some other musical styles.

iRJ: A lot of people refer to jazz as American classical music. Do you think this title has hurt or helped jazz?

AK: That’s a good question. You can’t help but reach out for a parallel with jazz to try to explain it to the rest of the world. And that’s why I think that term—America’s classical music—is used, because the rest of the world understands the sort of status or idea of unquestioned entrenchment, for lack of a better term, that classical music enjoys: government funding, private funding, and societal comfort with it. It starts with “Mommy and Daddy are going to the opera.” That’s the highest cultural thing that people can do. It’s very middle class, in a way.

So does jazz want to be compared with that? I don’t know, to be quite honest. There are good things and bad things about it. But I think, once again, this push for respect, for acceptance, for jazz wherever it goes—what it’s been and the incredible legacy and historical weight that it’s carrying—should raise it up to that level of awareness and appreciation. But do we in the jazz scene want to be compared with that sense of almost static movement within the classical world where, as I mentioned before, no modern artist is going to be compared to Mozart or Beethoven? I’m not sure. That’s where I think the comparison kind of falls short.

iRJ: Jazz today isn’t as popular with the younger generation. Do you that’s because the music isn’t necessarily danceable?

AK: Alice Coltrane once told me that when you lose a regular beat or a regular pulse in the rhythm, which is usually associated with dancing, and get into irregular rhythms, which is what John Coltrane was doing, that’s when the audience starts leaving. It really becomes more like art music.

I would say that dance is a very important social function of music. If you’re creating the music that everyone is dancing to, you’re creating the music that men and women are meeting each other to, that is sort of the soundtrack to important social interaction—Friday night get-togethers, Saturday night parties—there’s no higher reach than being able to create music that hits that function. So if you can create jazz, like Jimmy Smith did in the Fifties, where suddenly you’re creating music that is on juke boxes, that people are drinking to and partying to, it starts to reach at a whole other level.

Should jazz do that? Jazz should be whatever it wants to be, whatever the jazz player, composer, or bandleader wants it to be. And if they want to include that kind of function in it, I’m not gonna be looking down on that. So if Lou Donaldson still wants to get up there and hit “Alligator Boogaloo,” or Robert Glasper’s gonna bring Chris Dave into the band and they’re gonna use hip-hop rhythms and hip-hop beats as part of their music, I say, “God bless.” I think that’s great. Jazz has always been connected to all sorts of other music, whether or not people like that.

iRJ: Where do you see the music industry going today?

AK: [Chuckles] If I knew the answer to that question, I’d probably be sitting behind some desk in some office somewhere getting paid a big weekly salary. But I don’t know where the music industry’s going. There will always be a music business, but even more than that there will always be music. The need to create music—the need to play, compose, lead bands, perform—is timeless. It’ll always be there. But how all of that gets monetized, to borrow your term—it’ll figure itself out. The music industry was a very small part of the general economic landscape up until the Seventies, and then it just exploded and it kept on exploding. And to this day it’s sort of interwoven with the entertainment industry in such a big way that you have someone like Jay-Z owning [a share of] the Barclays Center. [Ed. note: Jay-Z sold his share in September 2013 for $1.5 million.]

For me, the question is where is creative music going? Will there always be space and support and an environment that encourages creative music? And jazz is a huge part of that. The idea of getting up there with instrumental music and improvising: as I said before, these are sort of like the defining elements of jazz, and will there be a place for that? And I think in the future there will be. One of the effects of the Internet and of digital music—downloads and sharing of music—which has taken away so much economic clout from the industry is also creating the freedom for individuals to create their own websites, to create their own labels, to create their own situations.

The thing is that jazz has always been a live music, a form of music that relies on live performance, on the meeting of the performer and the audience. Will there always be jazz clubs? Will there always be clubs dedicated to supporting this kind of music? I damn well hope so. I’m not totally convinced, but at least here in New York City we have the advantage of many clubs where, any night of the week, you still have choices of where you can go to hear some great jazz. And that, I hope, will always be there.


John Coltrane - Giant steps full jazz album

John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues 1962...

Miles Davis Ballads and Blues full jazz album

Charlie Parker - The Original Bird ( Savoy 1944-49 - Vinyl Album)

Philly Joe Jones

Miles Davis - Kind Of Blue [Full Album] (1959)...

Miles Davis - Cookin' (Full Album)

Jazz As Seen, Understood and Played In Mzantsi

The music of Jazz has affected many people around the world. Africans in south africa were not left unscathed by t its influence. There are many stories that can be written about Jazz in South Africa, and these are very important to show that Jazz, even though it was an American tradition, the Africans of South Africa SouthAfricanized the music of jazz adding to it ample accents from the African traditional music and singing.

The culture of Africans and American jazz fused effortlessly,but the music of jazz from South Africa was African accentuated. This means, certain african musical traditions and culture embedded within the African musical/dance/theaters, were amalgamated into the Jazz Idiom, and this is what makes the jazz from South Africa interesting. Below I will shhowcase some of the music of Jazz from Africans of South africa

Winston "Mankunku" Ngozi - Yakhal' Inkomo

Allen Kwela Octet - Stormy - 05

South African Jazz

Hugh Masekela - Part of a Whole -Home Is Where The Music..

Hugh Masekela - Part of a Whole -Home Is Where The Music..

Zim Ngqawana "Ebhofolo" ...

Abdullah Ibrahim - Woza Mtwana...

Zim Ngqawana - "Kubi"..

Ndikho Xaba & the African Echoes : Zulu Lunchbag (Song Composed By Gideon Nxumalo

The Heshoo Beshoo Group - Amabutho / From : Armitage Road (1971)

Dudu Pukwana - "Ezilalini"

Hugh Masekela - "African Secret Society"

Pat Matshikiza - Kippie Moeketsi : Tshona!

West Nkosi - Wedding Vibes

A South african African Cultural Autonomy And Historical Edification

In the cities, differences among African in degree and quality of urbanization and rural-urban contact have been significant in directing cultural process. Among the several patterns of urban life and categories of urban Africans, there are relationships structured by rural as well as urban resources and experiences. Understanding the patterns of urbanization of Africans of South Africa and the their music is important towards listening to and understand their music. The music of Africans of South Africa should be understood in it correct political, social and cultural context. And until the day Africans of South Africa begin to tell their story from that perspective and from its African-centered content and content their music and history will forever be misinterpreted by all the 'johnny-come-latelies ' into the South African Historical, political, social, cultural, customary and traditional point of view.

For Africans, urbanization involves commitment to permanent urban residence, and participation in relations centered in the urban social system. Culturally, urbanization means adoption of modes of interaction and expression developed in, but not confined to, urban situations.

Mayer says that an urbanized person is one fully confirmed in these modes and in valuing them positively. Yet, the cities have been exporting these patterns to the rural areas for more than a century through the system of labor migration, leading tot he growing phenomenon of rural urbanization. Yet, it is equally important to recognize that all the processes in urban settings are not necessarily initiated there.

Urbanization is not identical with Westernization, acculturation, or other kinds of change associated with contact between alien cultures or unequal material power. Missionary influence, colonial conquest and White settlement in South Africa initiated fundamental patterns of change in rural areas as well. When those affected migrated to the growing towns, those patterns were not only modified by urban experience, but exerted considerable influence over the forms that urban social relations and cultural patterns took.

The analysis of African status relations in urban South Africa involves oppositions - urban/migrant-rural, Westernized/Traditional, and petty bourgeois/unskilled - but that these relations have been ambiguous. The school-educated middle class viewed their White counterparts as a preliminary reference group. Yet also many, admired, at a distance, the cultural vitality and social accountability or rural traditional Africans, who they otherwise saw as a threat to the 'civilized' status.

Middle class Africnas' ability to command some of the resources of White culture made them a positive reference group for the working class and increased their social standing.

So that,African American performance culture figures importantly in this account not only for its comparative value, but also because of its powerful influence on the African South African culture. African American music and dance, and the very ambience of communities like New York's Harlem, communicated through traveling performers and and educators, print media, recordings , and films, have constituted a challenge, a model and a resource for African South Africans for than a century.

The blending of American music into African south african culture represents neither slavish imitation of a glamorous but foreign popular culture not the unthinking rejection of a a subjugated but precious African heritage. It is rather the result of a creative syncretism in which innovative performers combine materials from cultures in contact into qualitatively new forms in response to changing conditions, needs, self-images, and aspirations. In South Africa, stylistic elements from many sources have been recomposed into new frameworks of meaning, reflecting changing moral relations, systems of identity and value, and realities of power. This is the reality in which the music of South Africa was composed and performed.

The role of performing arts in creating such a basis, however, was primarily ideological.African performing arts helped to bring about ideological change as part of the process of urbanization. Yet it is uncertain whether this enhanced consciousness can become a source of solidarity clarifying the goals of cultural identity and social movement.

Those in the South African cultural struggle believe it can: Africans have tried to use performance to attain these ends, while White power structure has used it to inculcate a separate and subordinate African self-image. As Richard Adams pointed out,however, "cultural images" and symbolic action do not so much create the potential for control as bring about the collective recognition of that potential, turning it into actual social power. Expressive culture can become a source of power, but only in conjunction with the existing and increase of the material potential for control on other levels.

Interpenetrating with these social processes are parallel cultural processes whose range and variability for individuals makes their articulation even more complex. Hence, domination and autonomy produce opposed but interactive processes of acculturation and cultural retrenchment, Westernization and cultural nationalism. It would be possible to add other processes, and this is mostly related to South Africa, and its musicians, specifically.

The production and reproduction of performances must be located within the set of political, economic, social and cultural, relations between performers and the total context in which they perform. (W. d'Azevedo) These relationships depended on the distribution of power in the environment, economic and returns gained from different performances, demands of the sponsors and participants, available stylistic resources and performance training, along with cooperation and competition amongst the performers. In this case, the performer is the cultural broker, who promotes his autonomy whilst in the process linking all spheres of social reality with the consciousness by emotional meaningful expression of continuity and change. Then musicians and other arts performers bring life to a people, which the people can relate to and understand. they play the role of the djali, in the African Senegalese sense.

Amiri Barak, in explaining the role of the Djali amongst the Senegalese people, describes him this way:

"We talk about griot. six o'clock and all's well, the town crier. The Djali had a different fucntion. It was literally to make you jolly. We get the term glee, glee man, glee club. When Louis Armstrong, for instance, used to sing, "Just because my hair is curly, just because my teeth are pearly, just because I wear a smile on my face all the time, that's why they call me shine." We're talking about history that not understood by those upon which it was shaped.

"We talk about the griot vs. the Djali. What is the Djali's function" Griot is a word that comes into use through colonialism. If you go to Senegal, Mali, great places to go to, Ras, my second son, and I went there to visit the old slave castles. That's a hell of an experience. It's like the Jews when they go back to the concentration camps. It's something that breaks you down. We didn't say anything. I wrote my name inside an old castle. they said, "You mean there a a Baraka here many years ago?" But you know, when you see it, you go to the French possessions, you know, number one, nobody's there. You travel for miles, there's nobody in Senegal.

"You see the baobab trees and empty villages. Where are they? Maybe in Denver or LA or Oakland. But that strength of that French -African connection meant that the words coming out of Africa,, like Djali would become griot. What is the job of the Djali? Storyteller. That makes it abstract. Poet. Historian. Musican. Storyteller. Because if it's not a story, if it hasn't stored something, that's what a story is. It's a storage place. You store stuff in there. There's something interesting. So, it's a historian.

"The Djali was supposed to go to each place and tell the history of the joint.[They do so from the beginning. In so-and-so we did so and so. Why? Because everybody is not up to speed on that]. When the Djali comes, the first thing they do is say, "You know the world begins and this happened. It used to be this. to get the point . And now this is the case."

"Also, when the Djali gets down you call that Djeliaw. Billy Eckstein's most famous hit was "Jelly, Jelly, Jelly." There was a great pianist from New Orleans named Jelly Roll Morton. We always hook up jelly with sex. Why? You'll have to reason that out yourself. Must be jelly because jam don't shake like that. we could go on with these associations.

"Jam comes from djama, which means family, which ultimately means socialism, cooperative, ujama. so, when he says, Jelly, Jelly, Jelly drove my old man crazy, made my mama wild. The point is that the Djeliaw their job is to light up the mind, to make the mind shine, to make the mind smile, to make the mind laugh, to understand history as a revelatory story."

The musicians in South Africa act like Djeliaw who light up the peoples sprits and souls with music that they, the people, can dance to and relate to in many sing-a-kings with carry-o as can be seen in some video belown-out with the singers/artists/band

In order to understand both performance and the behavior underlying it as parts of a total system, We must examine these roles in regards to: how and in what ways relationships among elements are reordered in performance; how the usage of particular procedures is restricted to one group of performers or participants as opposed to others; how particular expressive choices shift the definition of a performance situation; the means a performer uses to articulate his position in the context of social conflict.(Blum)

In south Africa, as in elsewhere, but speaking specifically of South Africa, arts/music performance made a major contribution to the quality of life of the Africans.Many of the White philanthropists, scholars and so forth have confirmed this assertion. It is interesting to look at those that are concerned with the workforce.

From Johannesburg's earliest days, mine compound managers, municipal officers, missionaries, and some industrial employers have taken special interest in providing 'healthful' leisure-time occupations. Mine dancing, choir competitions, brass bands and cultural clubs helped ease tension, soften hardship and divert energies that might otherwise have been directed against them. Mine dancing had the added benefit from a manager's viewpoint, of promoting 'ethnic diverse industrial labor system itself. Performance played an important role in the total process of urbanization among Africans in part because it had a central focus of activity in ceremonies of the life-cycle, kinship and family, religion and even political and military organization in the African traditional society

Performances provided images for the reshaping and reordering of cultural categories underlying the organization of networks and communities. So that, performance is important for and to Africans in their attempt to find places for communities and personalized interaction to exist in South African cities for Africans. (Schechner)

African performances cannot therefore, be regarded as "mere" entertainment, since they are essential to the self-pursuit of African Cultural Autonomy. Cultural self-definition is in turn but an aspect of the effort to create informal connections needed to unify African people in practical ways, as the south African Black(African) Consciousness Movement has long been aware. Biko in this case come up into the discussion here.

In talking about musical, cultural, dramatical or other types of performances in South Africa, we must identify the material resources and imposed limitations of the historical environment. Also, we must specify the power relations and interactional patterns of the social field in which performance activity takes place. These realities provide the context of cultural adaptation.

After almost four centuries of settler colonialism in South Africa, for example, Schapera could speak of "the development of a specifically south african culture, shared in both the Africans and many other Europeans in South Africa and the presented certain peculiarities based directly upon the fact of their juxtaposition."(Schapera)

We also must understand the development and function/meaning/reality of African social roles, culture and traditions involved with the performances rendered by the Africans of Mzantsi(South Africa) The culture and traditional/customary principles of the Africans of South Africa. It is through these cultural practices, principles and performances shared by members of a the culture of Africans that meanings are embedded and embodied in the performance, dancing, singing etc.


Soul Brothers: Mama Ka Sibongile (Live in Concert)

Umlazi Maskandi

Stimela - Whispers In The Deep Live 2010

Phillip Tabane and Malombo Live at The Market Theatre

South African Music (Dikgomo remix)

GUM BOOTS - Northampton -South African - Dance-Singer

South African Music (Uya kwini ka rose remix)

Trussel - "I Love It"

Trussel - "Love Injection"

Amaqwati! By Blues Ntaka And The Daveyton Choir....

Xhosa - Uya wa pheteni Ngomlomo (This Is Mine!)

Some Jazz Discs For The Readers References

1945 (age 19)

Miles Davis - First Miles (Savoy SJL 1196)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Herbie Fields (clarinet, tenor saxophone) Teddy Brannon (piano) Al Casey (guitar) Leonard Gaskin (bass) Eddie Nicholson (drums) Rubberlegs Williams (vocals)WOR Studios, Broadway, NYC, April 24, 1945S5805-1That's The Stuff You Gotta Watch (alt. take 1)S5805-2That's The Stuff You Gotta Watch (alt. take 2)S5805-3That's The Stuff You Gotta Watch (mst. take 3)S5806Pointless Mama BluesS5807Deep Sea BluesS5808-1Bring It On Home (false start take 1)S5808-2Bring It On Home (alt. take 2)S5808-3Bring It On Home (mst. take 3)

Charlie Parker Story (Savoy MG 12079)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Dizzy Gillespie (piano -1/7) Sadik Hakim (piano -8,9) Curly Russell (bass) Max Roach (drums)WOR Studios, Broadway, NYC, November 26, 19451. S5850-1Billie's Bounce (new-take 1)2. S5850-2Billie's Bounce (short-take 2)3. S5850-3Billie's Bounce (new-take 3)4. S5850-4Billie's Bounce (new-take 4)5. S5851-1Now's The Time (short-take 1)6. S5851-2Now's The Time (short-take 2)7. S5851-3Now's The Time (new-take 3)8. S5852-1Thriving On A Riff (new-take 1)9. S5852-2Thriving On A Riff (short-take 2)

Charlie Parker Memorial, Vol. 2 (Savoy MG 12009)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Dizzy Gillespie (piano -1) Sadik Hakim (piano -2) Curly Russell (bass) Max Roach (drums)WOR Studios, Broadway, NYC, November 26, 19451. S5850-5Billie's Bounce (orig.-take 5)2. S5852-3Thriving On A Riff (orig.-take 3)Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Bud Powell (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)Harry Smith Studios, NYC, May 8, 1947S3420-4Donna Lee (new-take 4)S3421-3Chasin' The Bird (new-take 3)S3423-1Buzzy (new-take 1)Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (tenor saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Nelson Boyd (bass) Max Roach (drums)Harry Smith Studios, NYC, August 14, 1947S3440-2Milestones (new-take 2)S3442-2Half Nelson (orig.-take 2)S3443-1Sippin' At Bells (short-take 1)S3443-2Sippin' At Bells (orig.-take 2)Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Max Roach (drums)Harry Smith Studios, NYC, September 18, 1948B900-2Barbados (short-take 2)B900-3Barbados (new-take 3)B902-3Constellation (short-take 3)B902-4Constellation (orig.-take 4)same personnelHarry Smith Studios, NYC, September 24, 1948B908-2Perhaps (short-take 2)B908-3Perhaps (new-take 3)B909-11Marmaduke (take 11)

The Immortal Charlie Parker (Savoy MG 12001)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Dizzy Gillespie (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Max Roach (drums)WOR Studios, Broadway, NYC, November 26, 1945S5851-4Now's The Time (orig.-take 4)Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Bud Powell (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)Harry Smith Studios, NYC, May 8, 1947S3420-2Donna Lee (new-take 2)S3420-3Donna Lee (new-take 3)S3421-1Chasin' The Bird (new-take 1)S3422-1Cheryl (short-take 1)S3422-2Cheryl (orig.-take 2)S3423-2Buzzy (short-take 2)S3423-3Buzzy (new-take 3)Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (tenor saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Nelson Boyd (bass) Max Roach (drums)Harry Smith Studios, NYC, August 14, 1947S3440-3Milestones (orig.-take 3)S3441-1Little Willie Leaps (short-take 1)S3441-2Little Willie Leaps (new-take 2)S3441-3Little Willie Leaps (orig.-take 3)S3442-1Half Nelson (new-take 1)S3443-4Sippin' At Bells (new-take 4)Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Max Roach (drums)Harry Smith Studios, NYC, September 24, 1948B909-6Marmaduke (orig.-take 6)B909-7Marmaduke (orig.-take 7)B909-8Marmaduke (orig.-take 8)

1946 (age 20)

Charlie Parker - Yardbird In Lotus Land (Spotlite (E) SPJ 123)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Joe Albany (piano) Addison Farmer (bass) Chuck Thompson (drums)"Finale Club", Los Angeles, CA, early March, 1946Blue 'N' BoogieAnthropologyBillie's BounceOrnithologyAll The Things You Are

Charlie Parker On Dial, Vol. 1 (Spotlite (E) SPJ 101)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Lucky Thompson (tenor saxophone) Dodo Marmarosa (piano) Arvin Garrison (guitar -3/6) Vic McMillan (bass) Roy Porter (drums)Radio Recorders, Hollywood, CA, March 28, 19461. D1010-1Moose The Mooche2. D1010-3-3. D1011-1Yardbird Suite4. D1012-1Ornithology5. D1012-4-6. D1013-4A Night In Tunisia

Charlie Parker - Alternate Masters, Vol. 2 (Dial LP 905)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Lucky Thompson (tenor saxophone) Dodo Marmarosa (piano) Arvin Garrison (guitar -2/5) Vic McMillan (bass) Roy Porter (drums)Radio Recorders, Hollywood, CA, March 28, 19461. D1010-2Moose The Mooche2. D1011-4Yardbird Suite3. D1012-3Ornithology (Bird Lore)4. D1013-1A Night In Tunisia (excerpt) (The Famous Alto Break)5. D1013-5A Night In TunisiaMiles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Duke Jordan (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)WOR Studios, NYC, October 28, 1947D1101-BDexterityD1103-CDewey Squareadd J.J. Johnson (trombone)WOR Studios, NYC, December 17, 1947D1151-BDrifting On A Reed (Giant Swing)D1153-BCharlie's WigD1155-CCrazeology

Charles Mingus - The Young Rebel (Swingtime (E) ST 1010)

Vern Carlson, Miles Davis (trumpet) Henry Coker (trombone) Boots Mussulli (alto saxophone) Lucky Thompson (tenor saxophone) Buddy Collette (tenor saxophone, flute) Herb Carol (baritone saxophone) Buzz Wheeler (piano) Charles Mingus (bass, cello) Warren Thompson (drums) Herb Gayle (vocals -1)Hollywood, CA, March or August, 1946 or 1947 or January, 19491. O-189He's Gone2. O-190Story Of Love

Baron Mingus - God's Portrait / unknown title (not released) (Fentone 2001)

Vern Carlson, Miles Davis (trumpet) Henry Coker (trombone) Boots Mussulli (alto saxophone) Lucky Thompson (tenor saxophone) Buddy Collette (tenor saxophone, flute) Herb Carol (baritone saxophone) Buzz Wheeler (piano) Charles Mingus (bass, cello) Warren Thompson (drums) Herb Gayle (vocals -1)Hollywood, CA, March or August, 1946 or 1947 or January, 19491.God's Portrait2.unknown title

Various Artists - Jazz Off The Air, Vol. 3 (Spotlite (E) SPJ 147)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Al Grey, Candy Ross (trombone) Benny Carter (alto saxophone) Hubert "Bumps" Meyers, Lyle Parker (tenor saxophone) Sonny White (piano) Jimmy Cannady (guitar) Tom Moultrie (bass) Percy Brice (drums)Los Angeles, CA, May-June, 1946Just You, Just MeJump CallUntitled Original (Polishing Brass)

Various Artists - Boning Up The 'Bones (EmArcy MG 36038)

Miles Davis, Hobart Dotson, Leonard Hawkins, King Kolax (trumpet) Water Knox, Chippy Outcalt, Gerald Velentine (trombone) John Cobbs, Sonny Stitt (alto saxophone) Gene Ammons, Arthur Sammons (tenor saxophone) Cecil Payne (baritone saxophone) Linton Garner (piano) Connie Wainwright (guitar) Tommy Potter (bass) Art Blakey (drums) Billy Eckstine (vocals, valve trombone)Radio Recorders, Hollywood, CA, October 5, 1946NSC164Oo Bop Sh' Bam

Miles Smiles

Miles Backstage at the Berkeley Community Theater, 1971.
Miles Backstage at the Berkeley Community Theater, 1971.

Charlie Parker - Encores (Savoy SJL 1107)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Bud Powell (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)Harry Smith Studios, NYC, May 8, 1947S3420-1Donna Lee (new-take 1)S3421-2Chasin' The Bird (short-take 2)

The Genius Of Charlie Parker (Savoy MG 12014)

same sessionHarry Smith Studios, NYC, May 8, 1947S3420-5Donna Lee (orig.-take 3)S3421-4Chasin' The Bird (short-take 4)Duke Jordan (piano) replaces PowellUnited Sound Systems, Detroit, MI, December 21, 1947D831-3Bluebird (orig.-take 3)D832-1Klaunstance (orig.-take 1)D833-3Bird Gets The Worm (orig.-take 3)Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Max Roach (drums)Harry Smith Studios, NYC, September 18, 1948B900-4Barbados (orig.-take 4)same personnelHarry Smith Studios, NYC, September 24, 1948B908-1Perhaps (new-take 1)B911-2Merry-Go-Round (orig.-take 2)

Charlie Parker Memorial, Vol. 1 (Savoy MG 12000)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Bud Powell (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)Harry Smith Studios, NYC, May 8, 1947S3423-4Buzzy (short-take 4)S3423-5Buzzy (orig.-take)Duke Jordan (piano) replaces PowellUnited Sound Systems, Detroit, MI, December 21, 1947D830-1Another Hair Do (short-take 1)D830-2Another Hair Do (short-take 2)D830-3Another Hair Do (orig.-take 3)D831-1Bluebird (new-take 1)D833-1Bird Gets The Worm (new-take 1)Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Max Roach (drums)Harry Smith Studios, NYC, September 18, 1948B900-1Barbados (new-take 1)B901-1Ah-Leu-Cha (short-take 1)B901-2Ah-Leu-Cha (orig.-take 2)B902-1Constellation (new-take 1)B902-2Constellation (short-take 2)same personnelHarry Smith Studios, NYC, September 24, 1948B908-5Perhaps (new-take 5)B908-6Perhaps (orig.-take 6)B908-7Perhaps (orig.-master)B909-2Marmaduke (new-take 2)B909-5Marmaduke (short-take 5)B910-2Steeplechase (take 2)B911-1Merry-Go-Round (new-take 1)

Coleman Hawkins/Howard McGhee/Lester Young - A Date With Greatness (Imperial LP 9188-A)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Kai Winding (trombone) Howard Johnson (alto saxophone) Coleman Hawkins (tenor saxophone) Hank Jones (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Max Roach (drums)NYC, June, 1947215-3 | IM-3818Bean-A-Re-Bop216-2 | IM-3817Isn't It Romantic217-2 | IM-3819The Way You Look Tonight218-1 | IM-3820Phantomesque** also issued on Imperial LP 12188-A.

Charlie Parker - The Complete Savoy Studio Sessions (Savoy SJL 5500)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (tenor saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Nelson Boyd (bass) Max Roach (drums)Harry Smith Studios, NYC, August 14, 1947S3440-1Milestones (orig.-take 1)S3443-3Sippin' At Bells (short-take 3)Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Duke Jordan (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)United Sound Systems, Detroit, MI, December 21, 1947D830-4Another Hair Do (orig.-take)D831-2Bluebird (take 2)D833-2Bird Gets The Worm (orig.-take 2)Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Max Roach (drums)Harry Smith Studios, NYC, September 18, 1948B902-5Constellation (take 5)same personnelHarry Smith Studios, NYC, September 24, 1948B908-4Perhaps (short-take 4)B909-1Marmaduke (short-take 1)B909-3Marmaduke (short-take 3)B909-4Marmaduke (new-take 4)B909-9Marmaduke (take 9)B909-10Marmaduke (take 10)B910-1Steeplechase (orig.-take 1)

Charlie Parker On Dial, Vol. 4 (Spotlite (E) SPJ 104)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Duke Jordan (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)WOR Studios, NYC, October 28, 1947D1101-ADexterityD1103-ADewey Square (Air Conditioning) (Prezology)D1103-BDewey SquareD1104-BThe Hymn (Superman)D1105-BBird Of ParadiseD1106-AEmbraceable You

Charlie Parker - The Bird Blows The Blues (Dial LP 901)

same sessionWOR Studios, NYC, October 28, 1947D1102-ABongo BopD1102-B-

Charlie Parker - Alternate Masters, Vol. 1 (Dial LP 904)

same sessionWOR Studios, NYC, October 28, 1947D1104-AThe HymnD1105-ABird Of ParadiseD1105-C-D1106-BEmbraceable You (Embraceable)same personnelWOR Studios, NYC, November 4, 1947D1112-BKlactoveedsedsteneD1113-CScrapple From The AppleD1115-BOut Of Nowhere (Nowhere)D1116-ADon't Blame Meadd J.J. Johnson (trombone)WOR Studios, NYC, December 17, 1947D1151-DDrifting On A ReedD1152-BQuasimadoD1153-ECharlie's WigD1154-BBongo Beep (Dexterity)D1156-AHow Deep Is The Ocean (How Deep)

Charlie Parker On Dial, Vol. 5 (Spotlite (E) SPJ 105)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Duke Jordan (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)WOR Studios, NYC, November 4, 1947D1111-CBird FeathersD1112-AKlactoveedsedsteneD1113-BScrapple From The AppleD1114-AMy Old Flame (Blue Lamp)D1115-AOut Of NowhereD1115-C-

Charlie Parker On Dial, Vol. 6 (Spotlite (E) SPJ 106)

Miles Davis (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Duke Jordan (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)WOR Studios, NYC, December 17, 1947D1151-EDrifting On A Reed (Prezology) (Air Conditioning)D1152-AQuasimadoD1153-DCharlie's WigD1154-CBongo Beep (Habanera Mambobop) (Bird Feathers)D1155-ACrazeology (excerpt)D1155-B-D1155-DCrazeologyD1156-BHow Deep Is The Ocean

Charlie Parker - Crazeology / Crazeology II: 3 Ways Of Playing A Chorus (Dial 1034)

same sessionWOR Studios, NYC, December 17, 1947D1155-ABXCrazeology II: 3 Ways Of Playing A Chorus

Charlie Parker, Vol. 4 (Dial LP 207)

same sessionWOR Studios, NYC, December 17, 1947D1155-DDDCrazeology

1948

Gene Roland Band Featuring Charlie Parker - The Band That Never Was (Spotlite (E) SPJ 141)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Duke Jordan (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums) Kenny Pancho Hagood (vocals -4)"Three Deuces", NYC, March 31, 19481.52nd Street Theme I2.Dizzy Atmosphere3.My Old Flame4.All The Things You Are5.Half Nelson6.52nd Street Theme II7.Drifting On A Reed (Big Foot)8.52nd Street Theme III

Charlie Parker - Bird's Eyes, Vol. 6 (Philology (It) 214 W 29)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Duke Jordan (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)NYC, March, 1948The Way You Look TonightA Night In TunisiaGroovin' High

Charlie Parker - Bird On 52nd St. (Jazz Workshop JWS 501)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Duke Jordan (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums) Kenny Pancho Hagood (vocals)"Onyx Club", NYC, July 6, 194852nd Street Theme IShaw 'NuffOut Of Nowhere IHot HouseThis Time The Dream's On Me IA Night In TunisiaMy Old FlameThe Way You Look TonightChasin' The BirdDizzy AtmosphereHow High The Moon** also issued on Fantasy LP 6011, LP 86011; Original Jazz Classics OJC 114, OJCCD 114-2; America (F) 30 AM 6061.

Charlie Parker (Prestige PR 24009)

same session"Onyx Club", NYC, July 6, 194852nd Street ThemeOut Of Nowhere IIThis Time The Dream's On Me II52nd Street Theme II

Charlie Parker - Bird At The Roost, Vol. 1 (Savoy ZDS 4411/12)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Al Haig (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)"Royal Roost", NYC, September 4, 1948MC: Symphony Sid, Bob GarrityMC: Symphony Sid talking about 52nd Street ThemeMC-same personnel"Royal Roost", NYC, December 11, 1948MCMC: Charlie Parker, Al Heig takeingMC--same personnel"Royal Roost", NYC, December 12, 1948MC--same personnel"Royal Roost", NYC, December 18, 1948MCChasin' The BirdMC-

Newly Discovered Sides By Charlie Parker (Savoy MG 12186)

same personnel"Royal Roost", NYC, September 4, 194852nd Street Themesame personnel"Royal Roost", NYC, December 11, 1948Groovin' HighBig Footsame personnel"Royal Roost", NYC, December 12, 1948Hot House

Charlie Parker - The 'Bird' Returns (Savoy MG 12179)

same personnel"Royal Roost", NYC, September 4, 1948Ko-Kosame personnel"Royal Roost", NYC, December 11, 1948Ornithology (Thriving On From A Riff)

Miles Davis - Nonet 1948 - Jam 1949 (Royal Jazz (D) RJD 514)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Mike Zwerin (trombone) Junior Collins (French horn) John Barber (tuba) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) Gerry Mulligan (baritone saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Al McKibbon (bass) Max Roach (drums) Gil Evans (arranger, conductor)"Royal Roost", NYC, September 4, 1948MoveMiles Davis (trumpet -1,2,5) Kai Winding (trombone -1,2,5) Buddy DeFranco (clarinet -1,2,5) Lucky Thompson (tenor saxophone -1,2,5) Charlie Ventura (tenor,baritone saxophone -1/3,5) Al Haig (piano) Oscar Pettiford (bass) Shelly Manne (drums)WPIX Studios, NYC, January 17, 19491.The Squirrel2.Anthropology3.Body And Soul4.Fine And Dandy5.How High The Moon

Charlie Parker - Miles Davis - Lee Konitz (Ozone 2)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Mike Zwerin (trombone) Junior Collins (French horn) John Barber (tuba) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) Gerry Mulligan (baritone saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Al McKibbon (bass) Max Roach (drums) Kenny Pancho Hagood (vocals -5) Gil Evans (arranger, conductor)"Royal Roost", NYC, September 4, 19481.Godchild2.S'il Vous Plait3.Moon Dreams4.Hallucinations (Budo)5.Why Do I Love You

The Persuasively Coherent Miles Davis (Alto AL 701)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Ted Kelly (trombone) Junior Collins (French horn) John Barber (tuba) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) Gerry Mulligan (baritone saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Al McKibbon (bass) Max Roach (drums) Kenny Pancho Hagood (vocals -4) Gil Evans (arranger, conductor)broadcast, "Royal Roost", NYC, September 18, 19481.Move (Mood)2.Moon Dreams3.Hallucinations (Budo)4.Darn That DreamMiles Davis (trumpet) Fats Navarro (trumpet -2) J.J. Johnson (trombone -1) Brew Moore (tenor saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Art Blakey (drums)"Birdland", NYC, June 30, 19501.Wee (Rambunctious Rambling)2.Ow! (Chubbie's Blues)Miles Davis, Fats Navarro (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Walter Bishop Jr. (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Art Blakey (drums)Conception/Deception (Poobah)

Hooray For Miles Davis, Vol. 1 (Session Disc 101)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Max Roach (drums) Kenny Pancho Hagood (vocals -4)"Royal Roost", NYC, September 25, 19481.52nd Street Theme (The Broadway Theme)2.Half Nelson3.Chasin' The Bird4.You Go To My HeadMiles Davis (trumpet) Fats Navarro (trumpet -1) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Brew Moore (tenor saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Art Blakey (drums)"Birdland", NYC, June 30, 19501.Hot House (Miles' Midnight Breakaway)2.Embraceable You

Charlie Parker - Bird's Eyes, Vol. 1 (Philology (It) 214 W 5)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Duke Jordan (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)"Three Deuces", NYC, fall 1948Big Foot52nd Street ThemeHow High The Moon52nd Street Theme (Short Version)same sessionIndianaOut Of NowhereFine And DandyAll The Things You Are

Charlie Parker - Bird's Eyes, Vol. 5 (Philology (It) 214 W 19)

same session"Three Deuces", NYC, fall 1948Ornithology

Charlie Parker - Live Performances (ESP-Disk' ESP 3000)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Al Haig (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)"Royal Roost", NYC, December 11, 1948On A Slow Boat To China** also issued on ESP-Disk' ESPCD 3000.

Charlie Parker On The Air, Vol. 1 (Everest FS 214)

same personnel"Royal Roost", NYC, December 12, 1948Salt Peanutssame personnel"Royal Roost", NYC, December 18, 1948Out Of NowhereHow High The Moon

Miles's Catalogue.. Continued..

1949

The Metronome All-Star Bands (RCA Camden CAL 426)

Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Fats Navarro (trumpet) J.J. Johnson, Kai Winding (trombone) Buddy DeFranco (clarinet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Charlie Ventura (tenor saxophone) Ernie Caceres (baritone saxophone) Lennie Tristano (piano) Billy Bauer (guitar) Eddie Safranski (bass) Shelly Manne (drums)RCA Studios, NYC, January 3, 1949D9VB0021-1Overtime (shorter take)** also issued on RCA Camden (E) CDN 112.

Various Artists - The Be-Bop Era (RCA Victor LPV 519)

same sessionRCA Studios, NYC, January 3, 1949D9VC0021-2Overtime (longer take)D9VC0022-3Victory Ball (longer take)

Various Artists - Great Jazz Reeds (RCA Camden CAL 339)

same sessionRCA Studios, NYC, January 3, 1949D9VB0022-2Victory Ball (alt. take)

Miles Davis - Birth Of The Cool (Capitol T 792)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Kai Winding (trombone) Junior Collins (French horn) Bill Barber (tuba) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) Gerry Mulligan (baritone saxophone, arranger) Al Haig (piano) Joe Schulman (bass) Max Roach (drums) John Lewis (arranger)NYC, January 21, 19493395-3EJeru3396-3DMove3397-2EGodchild3398-1DHallucinations (Budo)Miles Davis (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Sandy Siegelstein (French horn) Bill Barber (tuba) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) Gerry Mulligan (baritone saxophone, arranger) John Lewis (piano) Nelson Boyd (bass) Kenny Clarke (drums) John Carisi, Gil Evans (arranger)NYC, April 22, 19493764-D7Venus De Milo3765Rouge3766-2EBoplicity3767-2EIsraelMiles Davis (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Gunther Schuller (French horn) Bill Barber (tuba) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) Gerry Mulligan (baritone saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Al McKibbon (bass) Max Roach (drums)NYC, March 9, 19504346Deception4347Rocker4348Moon Dreams** also issued on Capitol M 11026 entitled "Capitol Jazz Classics, Vol. 1: The Complete Birth Of The Cool".

Miles Davis - Capitol Jazz Classics, Vol. 1: The Complete Birth Of The Cool (Capitol M 11026)

add Kenny Pancho Hagood (vocals)NYC, March 9, 19504349Darn That Dream** reissue of Capitol T 792 entitled "Birth Of The Cool" + 1 bonus track.

Various Artists - Tadd Dameron Big 10 And Royal Roost Jam (Beppo (E) BEP 503)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Kai Winding (trombone) Sahib Shihab (alto saxophone) Benjamin Lundy (tenor saxophone) Cecil Payne (baritone saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano) John Collins (guitar) Curly Russell (bass) Kenny Clarke (drums) Carlos Vidal (congas)radio broadcast, "Royal Roost", NYC, February 19, 1949FocusApril In ParisGood BaitWebb's Delightsame personnelradio broadcast, "Royal Roost", NYC, February 26, 1949Miles (Milano)Casbah

Charlie Parker - Rara Avis Avis, Rare Bird (Stash STCD 21)

Miles Davis, Max Kaminsky (trumpet) Will Bradley, Kai Winding (trombone) Joe Marsala (clarinet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Mike Caluccio, Joe Sullivan (piano) unknown (bass) Specs Powell, Max Roach (drums) Ann Hathaway (vocals -1)television broadcast, "Adventures In Jazz", CBS TV Studios, NYC, March 4, 19491.I Get A Kick Out Of You2.Big Foot (Blues Jam #2)

Various Artists - Bebop Professors (Capitol (J) CR-8812)

Miles Davis (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Sahib Shihab (alto saxophone) Benjamin Lundy (tenor saxophone) Cecil Payne (baritone saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano, arranger) John Collins (guitar) Curly Russell (bass) Kenny Clarke (drums) Kay Penton (vocals -3)NYC, April 19, 19491. 3760-4John's Delight2. 3761-1What's New3. 3762-3Heaven's Doors Are Wide Open4. 3763-2Focus** also issued on Capitol (J) ECJ 50073.

The Miles Davis/Tadd Dameron Quintet In Paris Festival International De Jazz, May, 1949 (Columbia JC 34804)

Miles Davis (trumpet) James Moody (tenor saxophone -1,2,4) Tadd Dameron (piano) Barney Spieler (bass) Kenny Clarke (drums)"Salle Pleyel", Paris, France, May 8, 19491.Rifftide2.Good Bait3.Don't Blame Me4.Lady BirdMiles Davis (trumpet) James Moody (tenor saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano) Barney Spieler (bass) Kenny Clarke (drums)"Salle Pleyel", Paris, France, May 9, 12, 14 & 15, 1949Perdido (Wahoo)Allen's AlleyEmbraceable YouOrnithologyAll The Things You Are

Miles Davis/Tadd Dameron - Sensation '49: A Document From The Paris Jazz Festival 1949 (Phontastic (Swd) PHONT 7602)

same session"Salle Pleyel", Paris, France, May 9, 12, 14 & 15, 1949The Squirrel

Charlie Parker - Bird In Paris (Bird In Paris CP 3)

Aime Barelli, Bill Coleman, Miles Davis, Kenny Dorham, Hot Lips Page (trumpet) Big Chief, Russell Moore (trombone) Hubert Rostaing (clarinet) Sidney Bechet, Pierre Braslavsky (soprano saxophone) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Don Byas, James Moody (tenor saxophone) Hazy Osterwald (vibraphone) Al Haig (piano) Toots Thielemans (guitar) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)"Salle Pleyel", Paris, France, May 15, 1949Farewell Blues (Blues)

Various Artists - Stars Of Modern Jazz Concert At Carnegie Hall (IAJRC 20)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Bennie Green (trombone) Sonny Stitt (alto saxophone) Serge Chaloff (baritone saxophone) Bud Powell (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Max Roach (drums)"The Stars Of Modern Jazz", "Carnegie Hall", NYC, December 25, 1949Symphony Sid's RemarksMoveHot HouseOrnithology (incomplete)

1950

Charlie Parker - Birth Of The Bebop: Bird On Tenor 1943 (Stash ST 260)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) unknown or Al Haig (piano) unknown (bass) Roy Haynes (drums)"Hotel Diplomat", NYC, early 1950Billie's BounceCaravanDrifting On A Reed** also issued on Stash STCD 260.

Miles Davis - Dick Hyman - Sonny Stitt (Ozone 1)

Miles Davis (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Stan Getz (tenor saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano) Gene Ramey (bass) Art Blakey (drums)WNYC radio broadcast, "Birdland", NYC, February 18, 1950ConceptionRay's IdeaMax Is Making WaxWoody'n You

Here Are Stan Getz And Miles Davis (Kings Of Jazz (It) KLJ 20013)

same sessionWNYC radio broadcast, "Birdland", NYC, February 18, 1950That Old Black Magic

Sarah Vaughan In Hi-Fi (Columbia CL 745)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Bennie Green (trombone) Tony Scott (clarinet) Budd Johnson (tenor saxophone) Jimmy Jones (piano) Freddie Green (guitar -1,2) Billy Taylor (bass) J.C. Heard (drums) Sarah Vaughan (vocals)Columbia Studios, NYC, May 18, 19501.Ain't Misbehavin'2.Goodnight My Love3.It Might As Well Be SpringMiles Davis (trumpet) Bennie Green (trombone) Tony Scott (clarinet) Budd Johnson (tenor saxophone) Jimmy Jones (piano) Mundell Lowe (guitar) Billy Taylor (bass) J.C. Heard (drums) Sarah Vaughan (vocals)Columbia Studios, NYC, May 19, 1950Mean To MeCome Rain Or Come ShineNice Work If You Can Get It

Miles Davis - The Last Bebop Session (Jazz Music Yesterday (It) JMY ME 6401)

Miles Davis (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Brew Moore (tenor saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Art Blakey (drums)"Birdland", NYC, June 30, 1950band warming upMax Is Making Wax

Miles Davis All Stars And Gil Evans (Beppo (E) BEP 502)

Miles Davis, Fats Navarro (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Brew Moore (tenor saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Art Blakey (drums)"Birdland", NYC, June 30, 195052nd Street ThemeEmmett Berry, Johnny Coles, Louis Mucci, Clyde Reasinger, Ernie Royal (trumpet) Miles Davis (flugelhorn, trumpet) Jimmy Cleveland, Bill Elton, Frank Rehak (trombone) Rod Levitt (valve trombone) Bob Northern, Julius Watkins (French horn) Bill Barber (tuba) Eddie Caine, Romeo Penque (flute) Danny Bank (bass clarinet) John Coltrane (tenor,alto saxophone) Wynton Kelly (piano) Paul Chambers (bass) Jimmy Cobb (drums) Robert Herridge (announcer) Gil Evans (arranger, conductor)television broadcast, "The Robert Herridge Theater Show", CBS Studios 61, NYC, April 2, 1959New Rhumba

Hooray For Miles Davis, Vol. 2 (Session Disc 102)

Miles Davis, Fats Navarro (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Brew Moore (tenor saxophone) Walter Bishop Jr. (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Art Blakey (drums)"Birdland", NYC, June 30, 1950Eronel (Overturia)52nd Street Theme (Slow Broadway Theme)Miles Davis (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone) Kenny Drew (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Art Blakey (drums)"Birdland", NYC, June 2, 1951Move (Moo/Mod)Half Nelson (two)Down (Mick's Blues)Jumpin' With Symphony Sid

1951

Miles Davis And Horns (Prestige PRLP 7025)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Bennie Green (trombone) Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone -1,2,4) John Lewis (piano) Percy Heath (bass) Roy Haynes (drums)Apex Studios, NYC, January 17, 19511. 128AMorpheus2. 129BDown3. 130BBBlue Room4. 131AWhisperingMiles Davis (trumpet) Sonny Truitt (trombone -3) Al Cohn, Zoot Sims (tenor saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Leonard Gaskin (bass) Kenny Clarke (drums)Beltone Studios, NYC, February 19, 19531. 423Tasty Pudding2. 424Willie The Wailer3. 425Floppy4. 426For Adults Only** also issued on Prestige PRLP 7168 entitled "Early Miles 1951 & 1953". Prestige PR 7674 entitled "Early Miles". Original Jazz Classics OJC 053, OJCCD 053-2.

Miles Davis - Early Miles (Prestige PR 7674)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Bennie Green (trombone) John Lewis (piano) Percy Heath (bass) Roy Haynes (drums)Apex Studios, NYC, January 17, 1951130BBlue Room (alt. take)** reissue of Prestige PRLP 7025 entitled "Miles Davis And Horns" + 1 bonus track.

Sonny Rollins With The Modern Jazz Quartet, Art Blakey, Kenny Drew (Prestige PRLP 7029)

Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone) Miles Davis (piano) Percy Heath (bass) Roy Haynes (drums)Apex Studios, NYC, January 17, 1951132I Know** also issued on Prestige PRLP 7269 entitled "Sonny And The Stars". Prestige PR 7856 entitled "First Recordings!". Original Jazz Classics OJC 011, OJCCD 011-2.

The Genius Of Charlie Parker #8 - Swedish Schnapps (Verve MGV 8010)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Walter Bishop Jr. (piano) Teddy Kotick (bass) Max Roach (drums)NYC, January 17, 1951489-2Au Privave490-3She Rote

The Magnificent Charlie Parker (Clef MGC 646)

same sessionNYC, January 17, 1951489-3Au Privave490-5She Rote491-1K.C. Blues492-2Star Eyes** originally intended as Clef MGC 733.

Various Artists - The History Of Jazz, Vol. 4: Enter The Cool (Capitol T 796)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Kai Winding (trombone) John LaPorta (clarinet) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) Stan Getz (tenor saxophone) Serge Chaloff (baritone saxophone) Terry Gibbs (vibraphone) George Shearing (piano) Billy Bauer (guitar) Eddie Safranski (bass) Max Roach (drums)NYC, January 23, 19516252Early Spring

The Metronome All Stars/The International Jazzmen/The Just Jazz All Stars - Capitol Jazz Classics, Vol. 6: All Star Sessions (Capitol M 11031)

same sessionNYC, January 23, 19516253Local 802 Blues

Various Artists - Conception (Prestige PRLP 7013)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) Sal Mosca (piano) Billy Bauer (guitar) Arnold Fishkin (bass) Max Roach (drums -1/3)NYC, March 8, 19511. 140BOdjenar2. 141BEzz-Thetic3. 142BHi-Beck4. 143BYesterdaysMiles Davis (trumpet) Jackie McLean (alto saxophone -1) Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone) Walter Bishop Jr. (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Art Blakey (drums)Apex Studios, NYC, October 5, 19511. 228Conception2. 233My Old Flame** also issued on Original Jazz Classics OJC 1726, OJCCD 1726-2.

Miles Davis - Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis - Art Blakey (Ozone 7)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis, Big Nick Nicholas (tenor saxophone) Billy Taylor (piano) Charles Mingus (bass) Art Blakey (drums)"Birdland", NYC, September 29, 1951Move (Mod)The SquirrelLady Bird

Miles Davis - Dig (Prestige PRLP 7012)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Jackie McLean (alto saxophone -1/4) Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone) Walter Bishop Jr. (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Art Blakey (drums)Apex Studios, NYC, October 5, 19511. 229Out Of The Blue2. 230Denial3. 231Bluing4. 232Dig5. 234It's Only A Paper Moon** also issued on Prestige PRLP 7281 entitled "Diggin' With The Miles Davis Sextet". Original Jazz Classics OJC 005, OJCCD 005-2.

1952

Jimmy Forrest And Miles Davis Live At The Barrel (Prestige PR 7858)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Jimmy Forrest (tenor saxophone) Charles Fox (piano) John Mixon (bass) Oscar Oldham (drums) unknown (congas)"The Barrel", St. Louis, MO, spring 1952Ray's IdeaA Night In TunisiaWee DotWhat's New

Miles Davis/Jimmy Forrest - Lady Bird (Jazz Showcase LP 5004)

same session"The Barrel", St. Louis, MO, spring 1952Perdido (Wahoo)All The Things You AreOur DelightLady BirdOh, Lady Be Good (Ow!)

Miles Davis - Rare Unreleased Broadcasts (Yadeon (J) 502)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Don Elliott (vibraphone) Beryl Booker (piano) Chuck Wayne (guitar) Clyde Lombardi (bass) Connie Kay (drums)"Birdland", NYC, April 25, 1952piano solo (incomplete) / Lady Be Good / All The Things You AreMiles Davis (trumpet) John Coltrane (tenor saxophone) Red Garland (piano) Paul Chambers (bass) Philly Joe Jones (drums) Steve Allen (announcer)NBC television broadcast, "The Steve Allen Tonight Show", "Basin Street East", NYC, October 18, 1955Steve Allen IntroMax Is Making WaxIt Never Entered My MindMiles Davis (trumpet) Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone) Red Garland (piano) Paul Chambers (bass) Art Taylor or Philly Joe Jones (drums)radio broadcast, "Cafe Bohemia", NYC, July 13, 1957Walkin' (incomplete

1949

The Metronome All-Star Bands (RCA Camden CAL 426)

Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Fats Navarro (trumpet) J.J. Johnson, Kai Winding (trombone) Buddy DeFranco (clarinet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Charlie Ventura (tenor saxophone) Ernie Caceres (baritone saxophone) Lennie Tristano (piano) Billy Bauer (guitar) Eddie Safranski (bass) Shelly Manne (drums)RCA Studios, NYC, January 3, 1949D9VB0021-1Overtime (shorter take)** also issued on RCA Camden (E) CDN 112.

Various Artists - The Be-Bop Era (RCA Victor LPV 519)

same sessionRCA Studios, NYC, January 3, 1949D9VC0021-2Overtime (longer take)D9VC0022-3Victory Ball (longer take)

Various Artists - Great Jazz Reeds (RCA Camden CAL 339)

same sessionRCA Studios, NYC, January 3, 1949D9VB0022-2Victory Ball (alt. take)

Miles Davis - Birth Of The Cool (Capitol T 792)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Kai Winding (trombone) Junior Collins (French horn) Bill Barber (tuba) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) Gerry Mulligan (baritone saxophone, arranger) Al Haig (piano) Joe Schulman (bass) Max Roach (drums) John Lewis (arranger)NYC, January 21, 19493395-3EJeru3396-3DMove3397-2EGodchild3398-1DHallucinations (Budo)Miles Davis (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Sandy Siegelstein (French horn) Bill Barber (tuba) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) Gerry Mulligan (baritone saxophone, arranger) John Lewis (piano) Nelson Boyd (bass) Kenny Clarke (drums) John Carisi, Gil Evans (arranger)NYC, April 22, 19493764-D7Venus De Milo3765Rouge3766-2EBoplicity3767-2EIsraelMiles Davis (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Gunther Schuller (French horn) Bill Barber (tuba) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) Gerry Mulligan (baritone saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Al McKibbon (bass) Max Roach (drums)NYC, March 9, 19504346Deception4347Rocker4348Moon Dreams** also issued on Capitol M 11026 entitled " Capitol Jazz Classics, Vol. 1: The Complete Birth Of The Cool".

Miles Davis - Capitol Jazz Classics, Vol. 1: The Complete Birth Of The Cool (Capitol M 11026)

add Kenny Pancho Hagood (vocals)NYC, March 9, 19504349Darn That Dream** reissue of Capitol T 792 entitled " Birth Of The Cool" + 1 bonus track.

Various Artists - Tadd Dameron Big 10 And Royal Roost Jam (Beppo (E) BEP 503)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Kai Winding (trombone) Sahib Shihab (alto saxophone) Benjamin Lundy (tenor saxophone) Cecil Payne (baritone saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano) John Collins (guitar) Curly Russell (bass) Kenny Clarke (drums) Carlos Vidal (congas)radio broadcast, "Royal Roost", NYC, February 19, 1949FocusApril In ParisGood BaitWebb's Delightsame personnelradio broadcast, "Royal Roost", NYC, February 26, 1949Miles (Milano)Casbah

Charlie Parker - Rara Avis Avis, Rare Bird (Stash STCD 21)

Miles Davis, Max Kaminsky (trumpet) Will Bradley, Kai Winding (trombone) Joe Marsala (clarinet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Mike Caluccio, Joe Sullivan (piano) unknown (bass) Specs Powell, Max Roach (drums) Ann Hathaway (vocals -1)television broadcast, "Adventures In Jazz", CBS TV Studios, NYC, March 4, 19491.I Get A Kick Out Of You2.Big Foot (Blues Jam #2)

Various Artists - Bebop Professors (Capitol (J) CR-8812)

Miles Davis (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Sahib Shihab (alto saxophone) Benjamin Lundy (tenor saxophone) Cecil Payne (baritone saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano, arranger) John Collins (guitar) Curly Russell (bass) Kenny Clarke (drums) Kay Penton (vocals -3)NYC, April 19, 19491. 3760-4John's Delight2. 3761-1What's New3. 3762-3Heaven's Doors Are Wide Open4. 3763-2Focus** also issued on Capitol (J) ECJ 50073.

The Miles Davis/Tadd Dameron Quintet In Paris Festival International De Jazz, May, 1949 (Columbia JC 34804)

Miles Davis (trumpet) James Moody (tenor saxophone -1,2,4) Tadd Dameron (piano) Barney Spieler (bass) Kenny Clarke (drums)"Salle Pleyel", Paris, France, May 8, 19491.Rifftide2.Good Bait3.Don't Blame Me4.Lady BirdMiles Davis (trumpet) James Moody (tenor saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano) Barney Spieler (bass) Kenny Clarke (drums)"Salle Pleyel", Paris, France, May 9, 12, 14 & 15, 1949Perdido (Wahoo)Allen's AlleyEmbraceable YouOrnithologyAll The Things You Are

Miles Davis/Tadd Dameron - Sensation '49: A Document From The Paris Jazz Festival 1949 (Phontastic (Swd) PHONT 7602)

same session"Salle Pleyel", Paris, France, May 9, 12, 14 & 15, 1949The Squirrel

Charlie Parker - Bird In Paris (Bird In Paris CP 3)

Aime Barelli, Bill Coleman, Miles Davis, Kenny Dorham, Hot Lips Page (trumpet) Big Chief, Russell Moore (trombone) Hubert Rostaing (clarinet) Sidney Bechet, Pierre Braslavsky (soprano saxophone) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Don Byas, James Moody (tenor saxophone) Hazy Osterwald (vibraphone) Al Haig (piano) Toots Thielemans (guitar) Tommy Potter (bass) Max Roach (drums)"Salle Pleyel", Paris, France, May 15, 1949Farewell Blues (Blues)

Various Artists - Stars Of Modern Jazz Concert At Carnegie Hall (IAJRC 20)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Bennie Green (trombone) Sonny Stitt (alto saxophone) Serge Chaloff (baritone saxophone) Bud Powell (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Max Roach (drums)"The Stars Of Modern Jazz", "Carnegie Hall", NYC, December 25, 1949Symphony Sid's RemarksMoveHot HouseOrnithology (incomplete)

1950

Charlie Parker - Birth Of The Bebop: Bird On Tenor 1943 (Stash ST 260)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) unknown or Al Haig (piano) unknown (bass) Roy Haynes (drums)"Hotel Diplomat", NYC, early 1950Billie's BounceCaravanDrifting On A Reed** also issued on Stash STCD 260.

Miles Davis - Dick Hyman - Sonny Stitt (Ozone 1)

Miles Davis (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Stan Getz (tenor saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano) Gene Ramey (bass) Art Blakey (drums)WNYC radio broadcast, "Birdland", NYC, February 18, 1950ConceptionRay's IdeaMax Is Making WaxWoody'n You

Here Are Stan Getz And Miles Davis (Kings Of Jazz (It) KLJ 20013)

same sessionWNYC radio broadcast, "Birdland", NYC, February 18, 1950That Old Black Magic

Sarah Vaughan In Hi-Fi (Columbia CL 745)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Bennie Green (trombone) Tony Scott (clarinet) Budd Johnson (tenor saxophone) Jimmy Jones (piano) Freddie Green (guitar -1,2) Billy Taylor (bass) J.C. Heard (drums) Sarah Vaughan (vocals)Columbia Studios, NYC, May 18, 19501.Ain't Misbehavin'2.Goodnight My Love3.It Might As Well Be SpringMiles Davis (trumpet) Bennie Green (trombone) Tony Scott (clarinet) Budd Johnson (tenor saxophone) Jimmy Jones (piano) Mundell Lowe (guitar) Billy Taylor (bass) J.C. Heard (drums) Sarah Vaughan (vocals)Columbia Studios, NYC, May 19, 1950Mean To MeCome Rain Or Come ShineNice Work If You Can Get It

Miles Davis - The Last Bebop Session (Jazz Music Yesterday (It) JMY ME 6401)

Miles Davis (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Brew Moore (tenor saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Art Blakey (drums)"Birdland", NYC, June 30, 1950band warming upMax Is Making Wax

Miles Davis All Stars And Gil Evans (Beppo (E) BEP 502)

Miles Davis, Fats Navarro (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Brew Moore (tenor saxophone) Tadd Dameron (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Art Blakey (drums)"Birdland", NYC, June 30, 195052nd Street ThemeEmmett Berry, Johnny Coles, Louis Mucci, Clyde Reasinger, Ernie Royal (trumpet) Miles Davis (flugelhorn, trumpet) Jimmy Cleveland, Bill Elton, Frank Rehak (trombone) Rod Levitt (valve trombone) Bob Northern, Julius Watkins (French horn) Bill Barber (tuba) Eddie Caine, Romeo Penque (flute) Danny Bank (bass clarinet) John Coltrane (tenor,alto saxophone) Wynton Kelly (piano) Paul Chambers (bass) Jimmy Cobb (drums) Robert Herridge (announcer) Gil Evans (arranger, conductor)television broadcast, "The Robert Herridge Theater Show", CBS Studios 61, NYC, April 2, 1959New Rhumba

Hooray For Miles Davis, Vol. 2 (Session Disc 102)

Miles Davis, Fats Navarro (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Brew Moore (tenor saxophone) Walter Bishop Jr. (piano) Curly Russell (bass) Art Blakey (drums)"Birdland", NYC, June 30, 1950Eronel (Overturia)52nd Street Theme (Slow Broadway Theme)Miles Davis (trumpet) J.J. Johnson (trombone) Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone) Kenny Drew (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Art Blakey (drums)"Birdland", NYC, June 2, 1951Move (Moo/Mod)Half Nelson (two)Down (Mick's Blues)Jumpin' With Symphony Sid

1951

Miles Davis And Horns (Prestige PRLP 7025)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Bennie Green (trombone) Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone -1,2,4) John Lewis (piano) Percy Heath (bass) Roy Haynes (drums)Apex Studios, NYC, January 17, 19511. 128AMorpheus2. 129BDown3. 130BBBlue Room4. 131AWhisperingMiles Davis (trumpet) Sonny Truitt (trombone -3) Al Cohn, Zoot Sims (tenor saxophone) John Lewis (piano) Leonard Gaskin (bass) Kenny Clarke (drums)Beltone Studios, NYC, February 19, 19531. 423Tasty Pudding2. 424Willie The Wailer3. 425Floppy4. 426For Adults Only** also issued on Prestige PRLP 7168 entitled " Early Miles 1951 & 1953 ". Prestige PR 7674 entitled " Early Miles". Original Jazz Classics OJC 053, OJCCD 053-2.

Miles Davis - Early Miles (Prestige PR 7674)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Bennie Green (trombone) John Lewis (piano) Percy Heath (bass) Roy Haynes (drums)Apex Studios, NYC, January 17, 1951130BBlue Room (alt. take)** reissue of Prestige PRLP 7025 entitled " Miles Davis And Horns" + 1 bonus track.

Sonny Rollins With The Modern Jazz Quartet, Art Blakey, Kenny Drew (Prestige PRLP 7029)

Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone) Miles Davis (piano) Percy Heath (bass) Roy Haynes (drums)Apex Studios, NYC, January 17, 1951132I Know** also issued on Prestige PRLP 7269 entitled " Sonny And The Stars ". Prestige PR 7856 entitled " First Recordings!". Original Jazz Classics OJC 011, OJCCD 011-2.

The Genius Of Charlie Parker #8 - Swedish Schnapps (Verve MGV 8010)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Charlie Parker (alto saxophone) Walter Bishop Jr. (piano) Teddy Kotick (bass) Max Roach (drums)NYC, January 17, 1951489-2Au Privave490-3She Rote

The Magnificent Charlie Parker (Clef MGC 646)

same sessionNYC, January 17, 1951489-3Au Privave490-5She Rote491-1K.C. Blues492-2Star Eyes** originally intended as Clef MGC 733.

Various Artists - The History Of Jazz, Vol. 4: Enter The Cool (Capitol T 796)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Kai Winding (trombone) John LaPorta (clarinet) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) Stan Getz (tenor saxophone) Serge Chaloff (baritone saxophone) Terry Gibbs (vibraphone) George Shearing (piano) Billy Bauer (guitar) Eddie Safranski (bass) Max Roach (drums)NYC, January 23, 19516252Early Spring

The Metronome All Stars/The International Jazzmen/The Just Jazz All Stars - Capitol Jazz Classics, Vol. 6: All Star Sessions (Capitol M 11031)

same sessionNYC, January 23, 19516253Local 802 Blues

Various Artists - Conception (Prestige PRLP 7013)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Lee Konitz (alto saxophone) Sal Mosca (piano) Billy Bauer (guitar) Arnold Fishkin (bass) Max Roach (drums -1/3)NYC, March 8, 19511. 140BOdjenar2. 141BEzz-Thetic3. 142BHi-Beck4. 143BYesterdaysMiles Davis (trumpet) Jackie McLean (alto saxophone -1) Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone) Walter Bishop Jr. (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Art Blakey (drums)Apex Studios, NYC, October 5, 19511. 228Conception2. 233My Old Flame** also issued on Original Jazz Classics OJC 1726, OJCCD 1726-2.

Miles Davis - Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis - Art Blakey (Ozone 7)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis, Big Nick Nicholas (tenor saxophone) Billy Taylor (piano) Charles Mingus (bass) Art Blakey (drums)"Birdland", NYC, September 29, 1951Move (Mod)The SquirrelLady Bird

Miles Davis - Dig (Prestige PRLP 7012)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Jackie McLean (alto saxophone -1/4) Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone) Walter Bishop Jr. (piano) Tommy Potter (bass) Art Blakey (drums)Apex Studios, NYC, October 5, 19511. 229Out Of The Blue2. 230Denial3. 231Bluing4. 232Dig5. 234It's Only A Paper Moon** also issued on Prestige PRLP 7281 entitled " Diggin' With The Miles Davis Sextet". Original Jazz Classics OJC 005, OJCCD 005-2.

1952

Jimmy Forrest And Miles Davis Live At The Barrel (Prestige PR 7858)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Jimmy Forrest (tenor saxophone) Charles Fox (piano) John Mixon (bass) Oscar Oldham (drums) unknown (congas)"The Barrel", St. Louis, MO, spring 1952Ray's IdeaA Night In TunisiaWee DotWhat's New

Miles Davis/Jimmy Forrest - Lady Bird (Jazz Showcase LP 5004)

same session"The Barrel", St. Louis, MO, spring 1952Perdido (Wahoo)All The Things You AreOur DelightLady BirdOh, Lady Be Good (Ow!)

Miles Davis - Rare Unreleased Broadcasts (Yadeon (J) 502)

Miles Davis (trumpet) Don Elliott (vibraphone) Beryl Booker (piano) Chuck Wayne (guitar) Clyde Lombardi (bass) Connie Kay (drums)"Birdland", NYC, April 25, 1952piano solo (incomplete) / Lady Be Good / All The Things You AreMiles Davis (trumpet) John Coltrane (tenor saxophone) Red Garland (piano) Paul Chambers (bass) Philly Joe Jones (drums) Steve Allen (announcer)NBC television broadcast, "The Steve Allen Tonight Show", "Basin Street East", NYC, October 18, 1955Steve Allen IntroMax Is Making WaxIt Never Entered My MindMiles Davis (trumpet) Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone) Red Garland (piano) Paul Chambers (bass) Art Taylor or Philly Joe Jones (drums)radio broadcast, "Cafe Bohemia", NYC, July 13, 1957Walkin' (incomplete

Charlie Parker 1945

Charlie Parker - Bird The Savoy Recordings full album

Wynton Marsalis - Full Concert - 08/13/05 - Newport Jazz Festival (OFFICIAL)

Jazz Today, Jazz Tomorrow...

The Theolonius Monk Institute Of Jazz gives us the following abridged history of Jann:

I. Jazz Today

A. Three Types of Jazz Artists Today

Today’s jazz artists are basically going in one of three directions: traditional, contemporary mainstream, or "anything goes."

Traditionalists are performing jazz mainly patterned on Blues, Swing, Bebop, and Hard Bop; in other words, they exclude Free Jazz and Fusion.
Traditionalists believe that what they play is "real jazz," not the various hybrids and "add-ons" (according to them) that occurred in the 1960s and since. They are also known as "jazz purists."

Trumpeter Wynton Marsalis is at the forefront of this movement. He is an internationally acclaimed musician and has played a major role in the resurgence of jazz.
Contemporary mainstream jazz artists are influenced mostly by Hard Bop sensibilities.

Contemporary mainstream jazz artists use, for the most part, Hard Bop instrumentation and musical forms.
However, within the Hard Bop framework, contemporary mainstream jazz artists continue to push the music forward, e.g., ever increasing technical proficiency on their instruments, expanded musical harmonies (more difficult and complex chords and chord progressions), and deeper and varied emotions expressed.

Trumpeter Terence Blanchard is one of today’s most important contemporary mainstream jazz artists.

“Anything goes” jazz artists will put all kinds of music into the pot and stir it up; these can include but are not limited to:

all styles of jazz classical music (mostly of the 20th and 21st century variety) world music (i.e., music from other parts of the world), especially from South America and Asia all styles of blues, rock, rhythm and blues, Latin, funk, hip-hop, ska, rap, and popular music
T wo important jazz musicians in the “anything goes” camp include saxophonist Dave Liebman and trumpeter Dave Douglas.

B. "Crossover" Artists

1.

trumpeter Roy Hargrove

2.

bassist Christian McBride

3.

saxophonist Joshua Redman

C. Big Bands Today

Big bands (17-18 piece ensembles) are here to stay, not so much in the professional ranks (very few professional big bands exist), but in America's schools.

There are thousands of middle school, high school, and college/university big bands.
Repertoire consists of all styles of jazz from traditional big band swing to big band arrangements of bebop, cool, hard bop, and fusion; new arrangements are being written and performed all the time (as well as classics from the past).

D. Non-Traditional Instrumentation

Besides the traditional "jazz instruments" (saxophone, trumpet, trombone, piano, bass, drums, guitar, human voice), jazz is increasingly being performed on non-traditional jazz instruments as well, especially violin (an exceptional jazz violinist on the scene today is Regina Carter). Today, jazz can be heard on such "non-jazz" instruments as viola, cello, oboe, bassoon, and French Horn.

E. Women in Jazz

In the past, instrumental jazz has been primarily a male dominated art form; however, today more and more women are studying and performing jazz and becoming an integral part of the jazz scene.

One of the top female jazz trumpet players on the scene today is Ingrid Jensen.

One of today's few steadily working professional big bands is an all female group: DIVA (for a listening example, click "Something's Coming" below).
Audio Snippets speakerspacer Something's Coming - DIVA

F. Vocal Jazz

Jazz vocalists have always been an important part of jazz's rich history. Today, vocal jazz is not only important, it is credited with introducing jazz to many who might not otherwise have given jazz a chance (because there are words, or lyrics, more people can relate to vocal jazz than instrumental jazz)
Popular jazz vocalists on the scene today include Diana Krall, Dianne Reeves, and Cassandra Wilson.

G. Listening Examples

1.

Geri Allen’s “Dolphy’s Dance” on The Instrumental History of Jazz

2.

Danilo Perez’s “PanaMonk” (as in "Panama" and "Thelonious Monk") -- click below to listen

3.

any recent recordings of any of the previously mentioned jazz artists

Audio Snippets
speakerspacer PanaMonk - Danilo Perez

H. Cultural Implications

1.

In our society, we have traditionalists, mainstreamers, and "anything goes" types.

2.

Jazz is better for its diversity, and so is America.

3.

As time goes on, diversity is more and more accepted and cherished as an integral part of this nation.

4.

Many believe diversity is America's most defining characteristic.

The State Of Jazz Today

Music Historian, Ashely Khan provides us with the succinct update on The State Of Jazz Today from Irock Jazz(The Power Of Music)...

Ashley Khan is a journalist, music historian, producer, and adjunct professor at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. In addition to contributions to the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Down Beat, Jazz Times, and Mojo, Khan has authored Kind of Blue: The Making of the Miles Davis Masterpiece (2001), A Love Supreme: The Story of John Coltrane’s Signature Album (2002), and The House That Trane Built: The Story of Impulse Records (2006).

He has also served as road manager for Henry Threadgill, Cassandra Wilson, Paul Simon, Peter Gabriel, Hugh Masekela, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Britney Spears, and others. Khan has also worked as a deejay, video producer, music editor, and concert promoter.

In this exclusive recent conversation with iRock Jazz, Khan shares some of his insights on Davis and Coltrane. He also uses his studies on these pioneers as the foundation for a far-reaching discussion of the state of jazz today.

iRJ: Having done both books, one on Miles and one on Coltrane, how would you now define jazz, based off of those and what you know of the industry at large?

AK: That’s a big question. Jazz is one of those things that defines itself. If a performer, a composer, a bandleader, a record label, anyone wants to define themselves as jazz, usually it’s jazz, because it’s not something that people are running towards. It’s a special kind of music. Of course, it’s defined in a big part by the tradition and legacy that gave birth to it: very serious African-American roots, the blues, the role of improvisation. But I think, for me, the big three are the ideals that you could say are kind of the self-defining ideals of jazz, and that is a balance of tradition, innovation, and individual voice.

And if you think about other musical styles, the balance—especially tradition versus innovation—is different. When you think about music like hip-hop, there’s some amazing music that I grew up with that I just absolutely adored. But, except for Run-DMC, that’s not a style of music that cares too much about who was doing music in the Eighties, whereas classical music is all about tradition and very little about the innovation. So if you’re a 20th-century or 21st-century composer in classical music, good luck trying to go up against Mozart, Beethoven and Bach.

So that’s a very long answer to your short question, but I think that’s a way of defining jazz. When I teach it at NYU, I definitely push this idea of the ideals of jazz and how it helps define what the music is.

iRJ: In doing your research on John Coltrane, what were some of the most unique finds that you were surprised about?

AK: I wouldn’t say “surprised” so much as kind of “heartened” to realize that there really is a kind of cultish reverence for John Coltrane, and I think people would admit it themselves. His sound is so compelling that you can still hear the echoes and resonance of the Coltrane approach to saxophone today on any given night at any club. His story of the dedicated—I mean supremely dedicated—artistic individual, tied in with the spiritual aspect—a very deep, deep sense of universality: All of this adds up to a sort of messianic [chuckle] kind of cult figure.

Trane...

To realize that he was a guy who had his feet on the ground, who was putting food on the table for his family, who was negotiating business deals, who realized the value of his name, that he was getting popular, that he could renegotiate a contract with a record company, all of a sudden he sounds like jazz cats that I know now and get to talk with all of the time. He was a regular individual who realized his value and was trying to do what was best. He was actually thinking about starting a studio in his home out in Dix Hills [N.Y.], and he actually began that process. He was beginning the process of launching his own record company and having his own record label: Coltrane Records. All the same kind of motivators, the stuff that’s happening today. So he was very much a visionary, yet going through the same paces that today’s jazz musicians are going through. That was a surprise, just getting to kind of respect and revere the guy as a three-dimensional human.

iRJ: With regard to Miles, how close was he related personality-wise and drive-wise to Coltrane, and how different were they?

AK: Well, they were different people, different individuals who had a very different approach to how they did music and how they felt about their career. You just have to open up Miles’s book [Autobiography] to see the way he describes Coltrane. He says Coltrane was 100 percent music, that a woman could walk past him with no clothes on while he was practicing and he would not be distracted. And that’s pretty dead on. There was almost an OCD quality in how Coltrane was with music. And Miles was Mr. Super-Cool about it. Showing enthusiasm was kind of the opposite of the cool aesthetic, and even when Miles was doing fusion or rock or funk-influenced music he was still a very cool customer.

iRJ: Hip-hop guys have been able to monetize in a way in which jazz musicians have not. They’re able to succeed in business, they’re in movies. So what happened to the jazz musicians, because it all started with them?

AK: First of all, if you take the long view, the historical view, the hip-hoppers did not invent the idea of monetizing one’s ability to use music, especially popular music. It just happens that we live in a very hip-hop, hard-rocking era right now, and that’s the kind of music that’s getting the attention and getting the funding. But that’s always the case. Styles change, and where the money flows in the music world changes.

But think about the business ventures that African-American musicians have been able to create and monetize their own careers. You know, go back to the Seventies and think about Isaac Hayes. There was a time that he was looked upon as having created this incredible empire of money-making. Before that, Berry Gordy; before that, Ray Charles—Ray Charles owning his own masters—and James Brown. And then you look back further, in what we would call jazz, and you’ve got bandleaders like Lionel Hampton and Cab Calloway who are pretty much recording themselves and running their own businesses. The way that they ran their bands, there was a lot of monetizing going on way back then too. And there was a lot of economic independence and control that was being asserted.

So what we’re describing here is the number of zeros more so than the idea of why can’t jazz do this. If there was that much money coming in, we’d be praising jazz guys the way we talk about Jay-Z. But, when you think about it, what I just described about Coltrane’s efforts at creating a sort of economic independence for himself, creating a nest egg for his family, et cetera, it’s the same motivation, the same issue of “what else can I do to change the system to make it work better for myself as an artist and the kind of economic support that I need to create my music?”

iRJ: I talked with Robert Glasper some time ago, and he said that in making new music today he felt as though he was always competing with some past great. So when he makes new music, he’s always bumped off the top of the charts when they reissue another John Coltrane or Miles set, and this groove only happens in jazz . Do you think it’s fair that new musicians compositions compete with reissues from these past greats?

AK: Well, listen, if Robert Glasper says it’s there, it’s there. And if you open up Billboard and you believe the numbers that are in Billboard, and you see that Kind of Blue is still selling 2,000 physical units a week or whatever it does, then I can’t argue with that. And if you go to jazz festivals and you see that a Miles tribute draws a packed house whereas a new set of artists—Christian Scott, Ambrose Akinmusire, et cetera—is having trouble with the same venue just playing their own music, I would say, “Absolutely.”

But, like I said earlier, jazz is a music that is trying to work out a balance—and, at its best, it does work out that balance—between tradition and innovation. When an artist gets up there and suddenly pulls out a Duke Ellington ballad and there’s that spark of familiarity, there’s a sense of connection to the jazz history, to its legacy, that cannot be denied. And I think this is all part and parcel of the same kind of impetus within jazz to look back and celebrate the history. It’s like driving forward while keeping at least one eye on the rearview mirror. It’s something that you’ve got to work out.

Is it there? Absolutely! But do we want innovation? Do we want to be celebrating new heroes as well? Look at someone like Esperanza Spalding—or Robert Glasper, getting the Grammy for R&B album of the year. There is this idea that there is a new generation all the time, taking it forward. Does it create competition for new artists, where they’re not only competing with their colleagues and other people who are out there but also the sense of history? Absolutely! But it ain’t like classical music. There’s a lot more room for new in jazz than in some other musical styles.

iRJ: A lot of people refer to jazz as American classical music. Do you think this title has hurt or helped jazz?

AK: That’s a good question. You can’t help but reach out for a parallel with jazz to try to explain it to the rest of the world. And that’s why I think that term—America’s classical music—is used, because the rest of the world understands the sort of status or idea of unquestioned entrenchment, for lack of a better term, that classical music enjoys: government funding, private funding, and societal comfort with it. It starts with “Mommy and Daddy are going to the opera.” That’s the highest cultural thing that people can do. It’s very middle class, in a way.

So does jazz want to be compared with that? I don’t know, to be quite honest. There are good things and bad things about it. But I think, once again, this push for respect, for acceptance, for jazz wherever it goes—what it’s been and the incredible legacy and historical weight that it’s carrying—should raise it up to that level of awareness and appreciation. But do we in the jazz scene want to be compared with that sense of almost static movement within the classical world where, as I mentioned before, no modern artist is going to be compared to Mozart or Beethoven? I’m not sure. That’s where I think the comparison kind of falls short.

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