Images of Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. 1964

Martin Luther King Jr. - Leaning on a lectern in 1964.  Photo taken by Trikosko, Marion S., and in the public domain.
Martin Luther King Jr. - Leaning on a lectern in 1964. Photo taken by Trikosko, Marion S., and in the public domain. | Source

Remembering Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. - A Gallery

Martin Luther King Jr was an amazing American that we can never forget. My hope here is to help us remember him through some images which hopefully trigger some memory of even just a fraction of what this man accomplished. It is also to remember what drove him to want to in the first place.

How fitting that he received a Nobel Peace Prize for fighting racial inequality using non violent methods, in 1964. This is the same year that is represented in most of the photos below. Considering that his life was cut short, I am so glad he received that and other honors, and was able to see much of his dream realized. Of course, there was so much further to go at that time, and there still is. You will see a photo toward the end of this, where his eyes seem to say so much. One can't wonder what he was thinking or battling.

What a joy to observe so many still honoring him today. I hope this is always the case, as it should be for such a man that tried to do so much good. It isn't too often you get to see that commended and rewarded. I hope we can do justice to his memory and all he hoped to accomplish with his dream as we continue on in this 21st century. We are certainly not out of the woods yet, and encountering new challenges all the time with humanity. Perhaps taking another look at what his own values and morals were can help us in this regard.

Martin Luther King Jr. at Freedom Rally

Martin Luther King Jr. at a freedom rally.  Located at Washington Temple Church.  Photo taken by O. Fernandez, and in the public domain.
Martin Luther King Jr. at a freedom rally. Located at Washington Temple Church. Photo taken by O. Fernandez, and in the public domain. | Source

Martin Luther King Jr. at a Freedom Rally in 1962

This photo was taken while at a Freedom Rally in 1962. It took place at Washington Temple Church. A fitting place for a common kind of message he shared which included his ideals and beliefs, which helped to shape his dreams. Part of that message was from Christianity, or Jesus Christ himself, who taught the two greatest commandments. It included loving God above all, but also included things like loving your enemies and blessing them. No wonder he loved to promote non violent change like he did. This wasn't the only influence on King, but one of the strongest based upon what we know. He was known to almost always quote the gospels in meetings, speeches and all kinds of public discourses. Turning the other cheek, and putting the sword back in its place were a couple other of his favorite portions of the gospels to talk about. It gives a unique view into what drove him to accomplish great things.

It didn't surprise me at all to find that he respected Mahatma Gandhi and the ways he promoted non violent activism. In fact, he had wanted to visit India for a very long time, and finally got the opportunity to do that in April 1959. After his time in India, he was convinced more than ever, that non violent resistance is the most potent weapon available for people that are oppressed as they struggle for justice and human dignity. This is a lesson that not ought to be easily forgotten, and we need to remember it always lest we repeat history.

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Luther King Jr.

What a lovely looking couple, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and wife Coretta Scott King. Image in the public domain. Taken 1964
What a lovely looking couple, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and wife Coretta Scott King. Image in the public domain. Taken 1964 | Source

Martin Luther King Jr. With His Wife Coretta Scott King

A lovely image of both Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his Wife, Coretta Scott King. She is simply beautiful. They are both very beautiful people inside and out. One of many photos taken in 1964. They married on June 18th, 1953 on the lawn of her parents house in Heiberger, Alabama. They had four children, Yolanda King, Martin Luther King III, Dexter Scott King, and Bernice King. He wanted her to have a limited role in the Civil Rights Movement.

Martin Luther King Jr. is showing a medallion he received from Mayer Wagner in 1964
Martin Luther King Jr. is showing a medallion he received from Mayer Wagner in 1964 | Source

Martin Luther King Jr. Receives a Medallion from Mayor Wagner

Here we see a proud Martin Luther King showing his medallion from Mayor Robert F. Wagner. It was a special Medallion of Honor, that was given in New York. New York City had played a significant role in King's life and his legacy. It was great for him to receive such a public display of support for his causes. He more than deserved such an award.

The National Urban League and Harlem churches were some of his earliest supporters from New York. In time, others followed in suit. He traveled to New York City regularly to met with Civil Rights Leaders.

King Meets with US President Lyndon B. Johnson and other Civil Rights Leaders

January 18th, 1964.  President Lyndon B. Johnson is meeting with civil rights leaders, including James Farmer, Whitney Young, and Martin Luther King Jr. In the Public domain, and credit to Yoichi R. Okamoto.
January 18th, 1964. President Lyndon B. Johnson is meeting with civil rights leaders, including James Farmer, Whitney Young, and Martin Luther King Jr. In the Public domain, and credit to Yoichi R. Okamoto. | Source

Photo of US President Lyndon B. Johnson, King and others - Seeking Support on Initiative

This photo is of President Lyndon B. Johnson with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, Whitney Young, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer. He was meeting them to seek support for his War On Poverty Initiative. Dr. Martin Luther King gave his support, which makes sense and is in keeping with his other views. I wonder what King would think today of our country. With all the strides we have made as a country, we have also had some set backs. I am sure he would be proud in many regards of the United States currently, but also discouraged for other reasons. I thought this was a neat picture of these men. This photo was taken January 18th, 1964.

Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X

Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X waiting for a press conference, taken March 26, 1964 by Marion S. Trikosko, and in the public domain.
Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X waiting for a press conference, taken March 26, 1964 by Marion S. Trikosko, and in the public domain. | Source

Martin Luther King Jr.'s One Time Meeting With Malcolm X

This meeting between Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X took place after a press conference at the United States Senate. It was a brief and one time meeting only. When speaking of their meeting, King said that Malcolm X was very articulate, but then also added that he totally disagreed with many of his political and philosophical views. He said that what he said was true insofar as how his views were at that time. Photo taken March 26, 1964.

Martin Luther King Jr. at One of Many Press Conferences

Martin Luther King Jr, photo taken on June 8, 1964.  He is at a press conference, and photo is taken by photo by Walter Albertin, and in the public domain.
Martin Luther King Jr, photo taken on June 8, 1964. He is at a press conference, and photo is taken by photo by Walter Albertin, and in the public domain. | Source

The Signing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act

A neat image of the signing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.  Lyndon B. Johnson and others are looking on. Photo by Cecil Stoughton, White House Press Office (WHPO) and in the public domain.
A neat image of the signing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Lyndon B. Johnson and others are looking on. Photo by Cecil Stoughton, White House Press Office (WHPO) and in the public domain. | Source

King Attends the Signing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act

This is a photo showing the 1964 Civil Rights Act as it was signed into law. You can see Lyndon B. Johnson. and Martin Luther King Jr. in the photo along with many others. An incredibly important document stating that discrimination based on race, color, religion or national origin in public establishments,that have a connection to interstate commerce, or is supported by the state, is prohibited. These establishments could include restaurants, gas stations, bars, hotels, motels, taverns, trailer parks, and places of entertainment.

Another Press Conference for Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. photo taken July 30, 1964.  Gracie Mansion, Rev. Martin Luther King press conference (World Telegram, and Sun photo) by Dick DeMarsico.
Martin Luther King Jr. photo taken July 30, 1964. Gracie Mansion, Rev. Martin Luther King press conference (World Telegram, and Sun photo) by Dick DeMarsico. | Source

Martin Luther King Jr. on November 6, 1964

Martin Luther King Jr. during a press conference.  Taken November 6, 1964, by Dick DeMarisco and in the public domain.
Martin Luther King Jr. during a press conference. Taken November 6, 1964, by Dick DeMarisco and in the public domain. | Source

August 6, 1965 President Johnson Meets with Martin Luther King Jr.

Lyndon Baines Johnson meets with Martin Luther King Jr..  Taken August 6, 1965, also by By Yoichi R. Okamoto [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Lyndon Baines Johnson meets with Martin Luther King Jr.. Taken August 6, 1965, also by By Yoichi R. Okamoto [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 - Signed Into Law

This Voting Rights act was signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson on August 6, 1965. The bill empowers the United States government to oversee voter registration, and to ban discriminatory literacy tests. it is amazing to me that this wasn't really that long ago.

March 18, 1966 - Martin Luther King Jr. and Lyndon B. Johnson

Taken in 1966, this is Martin Luther King Jr. and Lyndon B. Johnson.  They were having a meeting in the White House. Photo taken by Yoichi R. Okamoto, White House Press Office (WHPO), and in the public domain.  This is one of my favorite photos.
Taken in 1966, this is Martin Luther King Jr. and Lyndon B. Johnson. They were having a meeting in the White House. Photo taken by Yoichi R. Okamoto, White House Press Office (WHPO), and in the public domain. This is one of my favorite photos. | Source

Another Meeting in the White House - Johnson and King 1966

This photo makes me wonder about the long, ongoing battle to fight for this cause. It had to be exhausting at times, and heartbreaking. We hear a lot about the many successes, but also many very long days. Perhaps it was just a more serious moment among many. Regardless, I think the photographer really captured the mood here. Look at President Lyndon B. Johnson in the background at one of their many meetings. This might be my favorite photo of King.

Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. - Laid to Rest after His Death

Martin Luther King Jr.'s tomb, at the Martin Luther King Jr. Historic Site.  This was taken prior to the death of Coretta Scott King.
Martin Luther King Jr.'s tomb, at the Martin Luther King Jr. Historic Site. This was taken prior to the death of Coretta Scott King. | Source

Martin Luther King Jr. Tomb

Martin Luther King Jr. was laid to rest after being murdered by James Earl Ray. The murder took place on April 4, 1968. He was arrested for this on June 8, 1968 at London's Heathrow Airport.

You can see on this photo that it reads, 1929-1968 Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. "Free at last, Free at last. Thank God Almighty I'm free at last." Notice the word free is capitalized each time. I noticed this, and couldn't help but think that it had to be very purposeful by his family. He was truly free, never to witness racial inequality like he had in the past. That phrase was part of his "I have a dream" speech. It was originally part of an Old Negro Spiritual.

Martin Luther King Jr. Historic Site - A place I would love to visit one day.  Public Domain
Martin Luther King Jr. Historic Site - A place I would love to visit one day. Public Domain | Source

Martin Luther King Jr. Historic Site Map

A markerMartin Luther King Jr. Historic Site -
Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site, 450 Auburn Avenue Northeast, Atlanta, GA 30312, USA
[get directions]

Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site and Washington D.C. Memorial

A wonderful historic site that commemorates so much of the life of Martin Luther King Jr. I would love to go there some day. These photos and brief information do not begin to cover the amazing life and accomplishments of such a wonderful man. Martin Luther King Jr. would hopefully be so proud of the much needed change he helped to bring to America. We have come so far in so many ways, but there is still much ground to cover. Ideas and morals continue to change and shift as we observe the cause and effect over time. I hope our country will do what it can to help carry on the dream of Martin Luther King Jr. for a very long time to come.

If you are interested in going to the Martin Luther King Jr. Historic Site, there is a map below.

There is also a beautiful memorial to Martin Luther King Jr. located in Washington D.C.

So much more could be said about Martin Luther King Jr. It is hard to know where to begin. I will end with sharing a video that shows a clip of his most amazing speech, the one he is so known for. The "I Have a Dream" speech is in a video below. It so eloquently shares his greatest and most important message of his day and ours. We all need to continue to fight for the rights of all people everywhere.

"I Have A Dream" Speech, by Martin Luther King Jr.

Portrait of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

A portrait of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., By Betsy G. Reyneau.  In the Public Domain
A portrait of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., By Betsy G. Reyneau. In the Public Domain | Source

Martin Luther King Jr. Poll

Do You Think Martin Luther King Jr. is one of the most important and influential people in United States history?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Perhaps
  • I never really thought about it.
See results without voting

© 2014 Paula

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Comments 4 comments

tirelesstraveler profile image

tirelesstraveler 2 years ago from California

Truly a great man. Thanks for honoring him this week.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 2 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Tirelesstraveler, I agree, he was a truly great man. Thanks for your comment.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 22 months ago from sunny Florida

His philosophy of trying to solve issues in a non violent way is so important. I just think and believe that if he were alive today and was seeing all of the violence that was occurring that he would be doing all he could to turn things around

Angels are on the way to you this evening ps


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 22 months ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hi PS, I totally agree about his philosophy about solving issues. You are right, I am sure, that if alive today, he would be doing all he could to turn things around. We need more like him!

You are so sweet to send angel blessings, and i send them back to you today! Paula

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