Rhythm and Musical Pie

Source

Rhythm and Musical Pie

There are many ways to teach children the basic elements of rhythm. With the use of audio and visual aids, children grasp concepts faster and remember them easier through association.

What You Need

Paper, pencils, a wooden spoon to tap out rhythms

Rhythm

Explain: Today we are going to learn how pies can be musical and that every kind of pie has its own special ingredient: RHYTHM (Write RHYTHM on the blackboard)

Explain: There are many kinds of pie in this world but before we talk about your favorite, let’s look at the word, pie.

Do: Clap while speaking the word four times: pie, pie, pie, pie and ask children to clap with you.

Clap once for every syllable.

clap once for every syllable
clap once for every syllable
The word, pie, moves in quarter notes.
The word, pie, moves in quarter notes.
Source

The word, pie, has only one syllable.

Explain: The word, pie, has only one syllable and that rhythm can be compared to a quarter note.

A quarter note looks like this:




Quarter Note Rhythms

Ask: What kind of pie has the same rhythm as the word, "pie"? (peach pie, meat pie)

Peach and meat pie - quarter notes

two quarter notes
two quarter notes

A quarter note can be compared to a one syllable word.

Quarter notes can fill one measure of music.
Quarter notes can fill one measure of music.

The rhythm for peach pie is the same as the word, "pie".

Peach Pie - quarter notes
Peach Pie - quarter notes
Meat Pie - quarter notes
Meat Pie - quarter notes
We speak in highs and lows.
We speak in highs and lows.

Rhythm is an important element of music.

Explain: Let's talk more about the different kinds of pie and their rhythm patterns.

Can you guess?

Explain: I have a favorite kind of pie and as I tap out the rhythm, see if you can guess the name?

● Tap the rhythm for strāw-ber-ry pie

● How many syllables are there in the word, strawberry? (3)

● Do the syllables for strawberry move faster or slower than the word, pie? (faster)

● Have children clap the rhythm together.


Rhythm pattern: Strawberry Pie

Straw-ber-ry pie
Straw-ber-ry pie
Strawberry pie is one of my favorites.
Strawberry pie is one of my favorites.

Some syllables move faster.

Ask: What did you notice about the rhythm? (Some syllables move faster.)

● “Straw” has the same rhythm as “pie,” but “ber-ry” has two syllables so they move faster; clap to demonstrate.

● Ask children to think of another kind of pie that has the same rhythm as strawberry pie. If necessary, show photos of other kinds of pie.

Blackberry pie has the same rhythm as strawberry pie.
Blackberry pie has the same rhythm as strawberry pie.

We speak in highs and lows.

Explain: When we speak, there are highs and lows in our voice patterns. Without those inflections, language would not be very interesting and neither would music.

Do: Speak in a monotone voice while saying each syllable slowly without pausing: "If we could take the rhy-thm a-way from words they would be ve-ry bor-ing to lis-ten to."

Ask: How would you like to hear everyone speak that way?

Explain: In normal speech, some words move faster and some move slower and the same is true with music.

  • Rhythm is a very important element of music.
  • Melody and rhythm go hand in hand and together they make music more interesting.

Eighth notes
Eighth notes
Blueberry pie has the same rhythm as strawberry pie.
Blueberry pie has the same rhythm as strawberry pie.

Eighth notes move faster than quarter notes.

Eighth notes move twice as fast as quarter notes and usually get 1/2 count.

  • Show photo of 8th notes
  • Explain that 8th notes have a flag which makes them move faster
  • Explain that two 8th notes equal one quarter


Some syllables move slower.

Explain: We just talked about syllables that move faster but we also have some that move slower.

  • Clap the rhythm for apple pie.
  • Can you guess what kind of pie I was clapping? Remember, there is one note for every syllable.
  • Can you guess other kinds of pie that have the same rhythm pattern? (lemon, pumpkin, cherry)

two 8th notes and one quarter note
two 8th notes and one quarter note
Two 8th ntoes and one quarter note
Two 8th ntoes and one quarter note | Source

Can you guess?

"Ap - ple" has two syllables
"Ap - ple" has two syllables

More Kinds of Pie

Explain: Has anyone every eaten mince meat pie or pizza pie?

Ask: Which kind of musical pie has the same rhythm? (apple, lemon, pumpkin)

Lemon pie has the same rhythm as apple pie.
Lemon pie has the same rhythm as apple pie.
Cherry pie has the same rhythm as apple pie.
Cherry pie has the same rhythm as apple pie.
Pumpkin pie has the same rhythm as apple and cherry pie.
Pumpkin pie has the same rhythm as apple and cherry pie.

The rhythm for chocolate pie is more complicated.

Explain: Chocolate pie has more syllables than some other types of pie.

  • Clap out the rhythm.
  • Have the children clap back the rhythm.
  • How many syllables are the word, "chocolate?" (3)

Explain: Chocolate pie has three syllables in one word. In other words, there are three notes for just one count.

  • Have the children clap the rhythm for "pie" while you clap the rhythm for "chocolate".
  • Have the children clap the rhythm for "chocolate" while you clap the rhythm for "pie."

Explain: When three notes move to one count, this is called a "triplet" which means three.

  • Show triplet
  • Have children write out a triplet and explain a "3" is written above the grouping of notes.

A triplet is a grouping of 3 notes that equal 1 count.

Triplets and one quarter
Triplets and one quarter

The rhythm for "chocolate pie" is a triplet.

Cho-co-late has 3 syllables.
Cho-co-late has 3 syllables.
Chocolate pie has a different rhythm pattern of notes.
Chocolate pie has a different rhythm pattern of notes.

What other kinds of pie have a triplet for the rhythm?

Ask: Can you think of another kind of pie that has the same rhythm as chocolate? (coconut)


Coconut pie has the same rhythm as chocolate pie.

"Co-co-nut" Pie has three syllables.
"Co-co-nut" Pie has three syllables.
Four sixteenth notes equal one quarter note.
Four sixteenth notes equal one quarter note.

Some kinds of pie have 4 syllables to one count.

Explain: We have talked about one, two, and three syllable words, but there is one more we need to learn about.

  • Show picture of huckleberry pie.


Huckleberry Pie

Explain: Not everyone might know what huckleberry pie is. Huckleberry pie looks a lot like blueberry pie. However, the berries are more tart. When I was young, I used to pick huckleberries when went to Canada. We would take them back to my grandmother's house and she would make jam, syrup, or huckleberry pie with the fruit.

Do: Clap the rhythm: 4 sixteenth notes

Ask: How many syllables do we have? (huck-le-ber-ry has 4 syllables and 4 notes move to one count (quarter).

Explain: These are called 16th notes.

  • 16th notes have two flags instead of one and they move even faster.
  • Show picture of 16th notes

Huckleberries grow wild on bushes.
Huckleberries grow wild on bushes. | Source
Huck-le-ber-ry has 4 syllables.
Huck-le-ber-ry has 4 syllables. | Source

More Ideas

  • Follow the same steps when naming other kinds of pie.
  • Clap out rhythms and have children guess the name of the pie,
  • Let children take turns clapping the name of their favorite pie.
  • Show photos of pie and have them clap the name in rhythm.
  • Examples are shown below with rhythm patterns.
  • Have the children clap continuously the rhythm of "pie" (quarter note) while you say the names of pies of other kinds.

We have many kinds of pie and each has its own rhythm pattern.

There are many kinds of pie.
There are many kinds of pie.

Conclusion: Music is My Legacy

Music has been a part of my life as long as I can remember. I have many wonderful memories as a child as I grew up with a very musical mother who was my inspiration. As I sat on her lap and placed my fingers on top of hers while she played the piano, we sang songs such as "Would you like to swing on a star . . . carry moonbeams home in a jar . . " or "I'll Take You Home Again Kathleen."

At the age of 5, I began taking piano lessons and it became my passion in life. I loved to practice so much my mother had to tell me to stop because I could play for hours. If I am ever discouraged, I turn to music. It lifts my soul and helps me to soar!

Through the years, I have taught music on many levels and whenever my grandchildren come to visit, I love teach them about music. Music fills my life, buoys me up, and I want everyone I know to love and appreciate it as I do. Therefore, anything I can do to instill a desire to learn is my motivation for sharing and writing hub ages. Music allows me to express my feelings in a way that words can never speak. Music IS my legacy!

Children's CDs by Kathleen Holyoak

World on a String and Kitchen Parade, by Kathleen Holyoak, were written in the effort to spark the imagination of young children and help them to discover the magic of music through rhythm and song.

"Flowers in Heaven," is one of the many children's songs by Kathleen Holyoak


Kathleen Holyoak

Kathleen Holyoak
Kathleen Holyoak
Holyoak grandchildren - 2014
Holyoak grandchildren - 2014

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Comments 23 comments

Kathleen Holyoak profile image

Kathleen Holyoak 2 years ago from Paradise Valley, Arizona Author

Thank you, Maureen, for taking the time to review my hubpage. It gives me great satisfaction knowing if I can help someone learn a little more about what I love so much.


maureen 2 years ago

Reviewed it yet again! the world is a better place because of YOU


Maureen 2 years ago

U are the most creative thinker I know. I love you and what u do SO much


Kathleen Holyoak profile image

Kathleen Holyoak 2 years ago from Paradise Valley, Arizona Author

Thank you, Janice. I always appreciate hearing from readers.


Janice 2 years ago

Really clever way to teach children about rhythm.


Kathleen Holyoak profile image

Kathleen Holyoak 2 years ago from Paradise Valley, Arizona Author

Thank you for your comments.


Sharon 2 years ago

Loved learning how to relate rhythm in music to food.


Kathleen Holyoak profile image

Kathleen Holyoak 2 years ago from Paradise Valley, Arizona Author

Thank you, Justine. Keep studying and practicing but you have to take it step by step. As the old saying goes, "You can't eat the elephant in one bite."


justine 2 years ago

Thank you G'ma for the effort you are putting in that's is so inspiring , indeed you are a great teacher .


Kathleen Holyoak profile image

Kathleen Holyoak 2 years ago from Paradise Valley, Arizona Author

Thank you, Maureen! Please feel free to share with your beautiful grandchildren.


Maureen 2 years ago

You are a wonder, you are!!!!!! Just keep on making the world a better place! I love you tons!


Kathleen Holyoak profile image

Kathleen Holyoak 2 years ago from Paradise Valley, Arizona Author

GW: Thanks for your comments. My goal is to help people help themselves learn music any way they can.


GW 2 years ago

Great article! I learned a new way to help children learn rhythm.


Kathleen Holyoak profile image

Kathleen Holyoak 2 years ago from Paradise Valley, Arizona Author

I would love to hear back from any of you who are willing to try these ideas for teaching children about music. If anyone would like pdf files of some of the photos or the rhythm patterns, just let me know and I will send them to you. Thanks for taking the time to read and learn and good luck!


Nicole Coulter 2 years ago

Thanks for sharing your ideas! I'm going to use them with my three children, and MYSELF!


Zelma Kinnison 2 years ago

Wonderfully clever and creative! An excellent method for keeping children interested in music and wanting more.


Ashley 2 years ago

What great content and ideas! Love knowing better ways to get kids involved with music!


Kathleen Holyoak profile image

Kathleen Holyoak 2 years ago from Paradise Valley, Arizona Author

Thanks, Dan. I appreciate your comments.


Daniel Carter profile image

Daniel Carter 2 years ago from Western US

Not only well presented, but clearly a great and valuable article to so many people! Teachers, parents, siblings, grandparents—you name it! Great work, Kathleen!


Kathleen Holyoak profile image

Kathleen Holyoak 2 years ago from Paradise Valley, Arizona Author

Thank you! Children learn more quickly when they can see and touch. Even eating a piece of pie and associating it with a rhythm pattern helps them to remember and learn more quickly. You have to be creative when teaching children and that's part of the challenge to keep those young minds from being distracted.


peachpurple profile image

peachpurple 2 years ago from Home Sweet Home

that pie looks cute and funny


Kathleen Holyoak profile image

Kathleen Holyoak 2 years ago from Paradise Valley, Arizona Author

Thank you so much. Check out my other hubpages about teaching music to children. This is another one . . . .

http://hubpages.com/entertainment/Teaching-Childre...


LailaK profile image

LailaK 2 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

My nieces are over from out of state and I am seriously thinking about doing this activity with them after reading your hub! Thanks for taking the time to write it. Voted up and away!

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