Not dancing on the bones of the dead – Górecki's 3rd Symphony

Auschwitz: Corpses of women piled up on the floor of Block 11. (February 1945).

 Picture from the Main Commission for the Investigation of Nazi War Crimes,, courtesy of USHMM Photo Archives. Accessed from http://history1900s.about.com/library/holocaust/blprisoner16.htm
Picture from the Main Commission for the Investigation of Nazi War Crimes,, courtesy of USHMM Photo Archives. Accessed from http://history1900s.about.com/library/holocaust/blprisoner16.htm

Is poetry possible after Auschwitz?

"Kulturkritik findet sich der letzten Stufe der Dialektik von Kultur und Barbarei gegenüber: nach Auschwitz ein Gedicht zu schreiben, ist barbarisch, und das frißt auch die Erkenntnis an, die ausspricht, warum es unmöglich ward, heute Gedichte zu schreiben. (The critique of culture is confronted with the last stage in the dialectic of culture and barbarism: to write a poem after Auschwitz is barbaric, and that corrodes also the knowledge which expresses why it has become impossible to write poetry today.)" - Theodore Adorno. Published in Prism in 1955. First written in 1949.

Auschwitz and all that name stands for looms over the 20th Century like a malign being, poisoning all who would reason with it, spreading the fumes of the gas chambers and the smoke of the crematoriums into our minds.

There is a great danger in this, a danger that our creativity will be stifled, our consciences dulled, our hopes extinguished. It is easy to feel with Adorno that it is “impossible to write poetry today.”

And when we add to Auschwitz all the terrors and horrors that have happened in the world since that frightful time, it seems even more barbaric to write poetry, or to sing songs, because to do so seems like dancing on the bones of the dead.

In the light of humanity's continuous search for expression and knowledge, how do we cope with this dark miasma that hangs over us, this deadening past that will not let us rest? How do we find appropriate means of communication, of making art that will satisfy us, without dishonouring the dead, the victims of our shameful lapses in humanity?

Cover of the Nonesuch CD
Cover of the Nonesuch CD

Górecki on the Internet

Górecki's music can be found on YouTube - I found references to about 470 videos of his music uploaded there, of which some are included in this Hub.

About 15 albums of his music can be found on www.emusic.com for download at reasonable rates.

Two responses

There seem to me to be two possible responses to this dilemma – either we try to ignore the past and the evidence of the vast cruelty of humanity, or we take into our very beings that cruelty and transform it with dignity and care into something which will transcend the past, something which will help us to regain our shattered dignity and lay the ghosts of the past with love and understanding.

One of the reasons perhaps why Henryk Górecki's now-famous 3rd Symphony, the Symphony of Sorrowful Songs, struck such a deep chord with so many in the mid-1990s when Nonesuch released its 1991 version with soprano Dawn Upshaw and conductor David Zinman is that the composer chose the second response in writing this amazing work of art.

The symphony was actually written by Górecki in 1976 and he built it around three texts relating to motherhood, loss and death. It was premièred in the French town of Royan at the International Festival in 1977 with Stefania Woytowicz as soprano and Ernest Bour as conductor.

The choice of Royan for the première is sadly apt for the town, which during World War II was the site of a German fortress, was bombed by the Allies towards the end of the war killing half ot the 3000 French citizens of the town.

Górecki had started thinking about the symphony in 1973 and looked around for suitable texts. He did not want the symphony to be about war specifically but to address the more general issues of death and sorrow.

He eventually found the three texts he wanted and structured a symphony of three movements, all of them marked “Lento”, around the texts.

The unaware last walk to the gas chamber at Birkenau. Accessed from http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/unaware.html
The unaware last walk to the gas chamber at Birkenau. Accessed from http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/unaware.html
"Let your mother share your wounds." Detail from the Isenheim Alterpiece by Matthias Grunewald
"Let your mother share your wounds." Detail from the Isenheim Alterpiece by Matthias Grunewald
"Speak to your mother, make her happy," Detail from the Isenheim Alterpiece by Matthias Grunewald
"Speak to your mother, make her happy," Detail from the Isenheim Alterpiece by Matthias Grunewald

First movement - Let your mother share your wounds

The text in the first movement is from a text, Lysagóra Songs, from a monastery in the Świętokrzyskie Mountains. These mountains are the oldest in Europe and some of the earliest forms of dinosaurs left their fossils in the area.

The movement opens with a sombre and very slow melody first stated by the double basses and then taken up canonically by all the strings in turn, rising through eight modes in the order:

  1. Aeolian on E (double basses, 2nd part)

  2. Phrygian on B (double basses, 1st part)

  3. Locrian on F# (cellos, 2nd part)

  4. Lydian on C (cellos, 1st part)

  5. Ionian on G (violas, 2nd part)

  6. Mixolydian on D (violas, 1st part)

  7. Dorian on A (2nd violins, 2nd part)

  8. Aeolian on E (1st violins, 2nd part)

In the second section the soprano enters singing the words of the Virgin Mary lamenting the death of her Son:

My son, chosen and loved,

Let your mother share your wounds

And since, my dear son,

I have always kept you in my heart,

And loyally served you,

Speak to your mother,

make her happy,

Though, my cherished hope,

you are now leaving me.

The third section of the movement sees the canon introduced again by all eight parts with each part dropping out sequentially in reverse order of their appearance in the first section, until the whole movement ends with the basses stating the melody alone again.

This movement, typically about 27 minutes long, is as long as the second and third movements together.

Lemminkinen's Mother (1897) by Akseli Gallen-Kallela. This work depicts a scene from the Finnish epic poem Kalevala. Image from Wikipedia
Lemminkinen's Mother (1897) by Akseli Gallen-Kallela. This work depicts a scene from the Finnish epic poem Kalevala. Image from Wikipedia

Second movement - No, Mother, do not weep

The text of the second movement is a prayer scratched on the wall of a Gestapo cell in Southern Poland. The words were a simple prayer scratched into the bricks of the wall by an 18-year-old woman, Helena Wanda Błażusiakówna, who was imprisoned there in 1944. She wrote these simple words:

No, Mother, do not weep,

Most chaste Queen of Heaven

Help me always.

Hail Mary.

Gorecki said of this little sentence: "I have to admit that I have always been irritated by grand words, by calls for revenge. Perhaps in the face of death I would shout out in this way. But the sentence I found is different, almost an apology or explanation for having got herself into such trouble; she is seeking comfort and support in simple, short but meaningful words".

He continued, “She does not think about herself; whether she deserves her fate or not. Instead, she only thinks about her mother: because it is her mother who will experience true despair. This inscription was something extraordinary. And it really fascinated me."

Mother and Child by Hugues Merle
Mother and Child by Hugues Merle

Third movement - Oh, sing for him God's little song-birds

Upper Silesia in Southern Poland was disputed territory, scene of much troubled history and a site of especially difficult relations between Poles and German-speakers. This situation was exacerbated after the First World War when the interests of the two groups were so opposed as to be expressed in a series of armed uprisings and repressions.

A series of three uprisings occurred between 1919 and 1921. The words of the song used by Górecki date from those troubled times.

Where has he gone
My dearest son?
Perhaps during the uprising
The cruel enemy killed him

Ah, you bad people
In the name of God, the most Holy,
Tell me, why did you kill
My son?

Never again
Will I have his support
Even if I cry
My old eyes out

Were my bitter tears
to create another River Oder
They would not restore to life
My son

He lies in his grave
and I know not where
Though I keep asking people
Everywhere

Perhaps the poor child
Lies in a rough ditch
and instead he could have been
lying in his warm bed

Oh, sing for him
God's little song-birds
Since his mother
Cannot find him

And you, God's little flowers
May you blossom all around
So that my son
May sleep happily

Image from Wikipedia
Image from Wikipedia
Detail from the Isenheim Altarpiece by Matthias Grunewald
Detail from the Isenheim Altarpiece by Matthias Grunewald

The documentary

Tony Palmer made a documentary of an interview with Górecki interspersed with video from the Upshaw/Zinman recording and footage from World War II and other terrible things. This documentary was released on DVD in early 2008.

I found it intensely moving when I first saw it, though it could be said that the extraneous footage detracts from both the performance and the interview.

Well worth watching.

The composer Henryk Mikołaj Górecki

“Before I die, I want to know what music is.” - Henryk Górecki.

Górecki was born in the small Silesian village of Czernica on 6 December 1933 to music-loving parents of modest means, Roman and Otylia. Otylia died when Henryk was two and his father remarried.

In 1943 Górecki began taking violin lessons from a local chłopski filozof (peasant philosopher) and musician called Paweł Hajduga.

As a result of a fall two years later Górecki contracted a tubercular bone infection which required a two-year hospitalisation and led to almost permanent ill-health.

Górecki continued his music studies at the Katowice Academy of Music where he studied under composer Bolesław Szabelski and graduated with honours in 1960.

Szabelski had a great love of the music of the Podhale region, the Polish Highlands, which he imparted to Górecki who,when asked about a planned trip to Paris, told an interviewer in 1962: "Paris can wait. First Podhale."

In the same interview, with interviewer Leon Markiewicz, Górecki said: "I particularly value artistic honesty, which is based on one's ethics, psyche and interests." Perhaps it is that commitment to a holistic view of the artistic process which shines through all of Górecki's music and enables a direct connection between composer, player and listener which I experience in listening to even his more atonal and difficult works.

There is a feeling of immediacy and humanity in all, a feeling that I get of the man's empathy and lack of concern with fashion and popularity.

In a 1994 interview with Bruce Duffie Górecki said:

"I do not choose my listeners. What I mean is, I never write for my listeners. I think about my audience, but I am not writing for them. I have something to tell them, but the audience must also put a certain effort into it. But I never wrote for an audience and never will write for one because you have to give the listener something and he has to make an effort in order to understand certain things. The same thing is true of poetry, of paintings, of books. If I were thinking of my audience and one likes this, one likes that, one likes another thing, I would never know what to write. Let every listener choose that which interests him. I have nothing against one person liking Mozart or Shostakovich or Leonard Bernstein, but doesn't like Górecki. That's fine with me. I, too, like certain things"

Górecki did not exploit the incredible success of the Nonesuch CD of the Third, he was not swayed by worldwide sales of more than 1 million or the high positions on the pop and classical charts. He just patiently went on with doing what he did best, expressing his deep humanity in music of exceptional power and grace.

His commitment to music was total. As he expressed it to Bruce Duffie: "If you can live without music for two or three days, then don't write – it might be better to spend the time with a girl or with a beer."

During his career as a composer Górecki developed from his early serialist style to a more tonal and rich musical canvas which did not always endear him to the avant garde who regarded him as rather a sell-out.

He was also not completely within the "holy minimalist" school of, for example, Arvo Pärt and John Tavener.

Górecki remained an individualist, a highly original composer whose works were infused with his Catholic sensibility but never became dogmatic.

If you have not heard some of his other works I encourage you to listen to the music in the videos here with an open and receptive ear - you will hear much to delight and enlighten!

Górecki died on 12 November 2010.

Perhaps he can best be remembered, apart from his wonderful music, by his commitment to humanity and his art: "All my life I've done what I've wanted and I've always fought for what I wanted to fight for, and I will continue to fight for those ideals. Some people take an automatic gun and shoot. I can only fight with my notes on the page."


Copyright Notice

The text and all images on this page, unless otherwise indicated, are by Tony McGregor who hereby asserts his copyright on the material. Should you wish to use any of the text or images feel free to do so with proper attribution and, if possible, a link back to this page. Thank you.

© Tony McGregor 2011

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Comments 67 comments

Mentalist acer profile image

Mentalist acer 5 years ago from A Voice in your Mind!

The Symphony no 3,Op 36 is a theme usurped in some movie themes...the tradgedy is we do not learn.;)


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

I cannot comment, apart to say, "What a magnificent hub". I thought I was going to listen to really dreadful atonal music, but it was beautiful. Thank you for opening my ears and eyes (now unashamedly tearful) to this music, and the composer.

Voted up, Awesome and beautiful.


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 5 years ago from South Africa

The Holocaust is certainly the most tragic event in recent world history, though I always remember the tragedies of the past as well – remember the year Jesus was born, the killing of all those baby boys under the age of two - and so many others horrors happened all over the world since the beginning of time. Cruelty had, and still has, no boundaries. There will always be unmerciful oppressors and heartless criminals - and why, we may ask?

I love the music of the Israeli’s. Most of it is composed in the (nostalgic) minor key. They also love to utilize the sound of the oboe - an instrument that emphasizes sadness and nostalgia.

Tony, thanks a lot for this interesting hub and all the info about composer Henryk Miko?aj Górecki. I enjoyed the read. Take care. Tot weersiens.


DrumsAcousticMuse profile image

DrumsAcousticMuse 5 years ago from Los Angeles

extremely insightful... i've been to auschwitz and its not something you can just "move on" from


Literary Geisha profile image

Literary Geisha 5 years ago from Philippines

thought provoking. somehow, even without playing the videos, reading the hub alone moved me. thanks for sharing.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Bryan - thanks for stopping by. I know that the music was used in three movies - Maurice Pialat's "Police", Peter Weir's "Fearless", and in the soundtrack to Julian Schnabel's "Basquiat".

Thanks again for the comment.

Love and peace

Tony


Micky Dee profile image

Micky Dee 5 years ago

Very beautiful brother Tony. We have to talk it out, write it out, sing it, dance it out...we have to work it out. God bless you Tony!


SimeyC profile image

SimeyC 5 years ago from NJ, USA

Excellent and provocative hub - I like to think that we can remember terrible events with art - they are part of history and if we can remember them with light as well as dark then that is good.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 5 years ago from Wales

Hi Tony,

A beautiful hub, thank you so much for sharing this rare treat.

Take care

Eiddwen.


Garnetbird 5 years ago

An awesome tribute-I published one Hub about the Holocaust called Heroine of the Holocaust, which has been somewhat ignored. This period of history deserves all the tributes we can give it!!


caretakerray 5 years ago

Tony:

This was awesome! You have reignted my creative side! Thanx for a great Hub.

caretakerray


Ingenira profile image

Ingenira 5 years ago

Another amazing story, Tony. Górecki is such a unique individual.

Life is worth living if one can say,

"All my life I've done what I've wanted and I've always fought for what I wanted to fight for.."

I like the way he did it.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Ian - so glad you enjoyed (?) this Hub. He was such a wonderful man and composer. I have long wanted to write about him and the time seemd right!

Thanks for stopping by and for the wonderful comment.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Martie - thank you my goeie vriend! Ek waardeer jou besoek opreg.

I believe we can never talk enough about these terrible things - we need to learn as much as we can about them to try to prevent them happening again.

Alles van die beste

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

DrumsAcousticMuse - thank you so much. I have not nhad the good fortune to visit Auschwitz but can imagine it is difficult to "move on"!

Love and peace

Tony


Tatjana-Mihaela profile image

Tatjana-Mihaela 5 years ago from Zadar, CROATIA

Never listened Gorecki`s music before but I am glad I did now.

Inspiring music -Simphony No3 is -divine- and I certainly like his attitude towards his audience.

It is not possible to ignore the past, especially after so many victims, unjustice and sorrow - much better is to try to transform this energy through the various art forms.

Thank you so much for teaching us something new and beautiful - love and peace.


Rod Marsden profile image

Rod Marsden 5 years ago from Wollongong, NSW, Australia

Tony, we must be careful how we look upon the holocaust. It was a terrible and tragic event and it was in recent history. What Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge did in Cambodia in the 1970s was just as horrific as what Hitler and the Nazis did though on a somewhat smaller scale. Even so, in Cambodia at least a million people were systematically destroyed and temples desecrated. Small potatoes compared to the holocaust but it happened when I was a kid. It happened at a time when people said about the holocaust, never again.

The music is appropriate. It has a soulful, haunting quality.

There were at least two really bad lapses in humanity in the 20th Century. Let us hope there will not be lapses of such magnitude in the 21st Century.

I have no wish to visit Auschwitz. It would just be too depressing. I have seen the film footage of what the Russians and the Americans found and that is enough.

I have also checked out and actually have a copy of Art Spiegelman's Maus which is a unique biography of the author's father, a Polish Jew, and his experiences during the holocaust. It is the only graphic work I know of to win a Pulitzer Prize. It is rather a haunting read and somewhat disturbing.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 5 years ago from Southern Illinois

Tony, Listening to the music, brings a chill, esp. Sonata # 1, op 6 and the symphony # 3. I love the piano. I listen to Opera that i've downloaded. The picture of the boy standing with hands raised is so terrifying. Gorecki's music made the pictures more vivid. What a horrible act and the world seemed to look away. I'm so happy that you brought this story to life. Hitler's order to exterminate millions of Jewish people should never be forgotten.

Love and Peace


sligobay profile image

sligobay 5 years ago from east of the equator

Tony my friend you are a humanitarian and an artist of the highest caliber. I am very uninformed about music but your descriptions were sonorous and melodic as you dissected the work. Of course I listened to all of the videos. Your words compelled me to take the time to listen - reflect - and meditate. Thank you for a spiritual journey.


K. Burns Darling profile image

K. Burns Darling 5 years ago from Orange County, California

My great-grandparents were Eastern European Jews who fled the pogroms of what was then White Russia, and settled in the United States, where their only child, a girl named Ruth, was born on the sixth of January in 1908. Ruth was my Bubbie, a strong, independent, and fierce woman, who was always ahead of her time. She passed away on 30 December 2007, one week before her 100th birthday. She was the wisest woman I have ever known....Why am I telling you this? Because, as I read and listened to this amazing hub of yours, one thought kept entering my mind, it was like a whisper of something I remember her saying to me a very long time ago, "and out of the ashes rose the mighty and beautiful phoenix.....even in the ugliest of things, there is beauty to be found." (or something like that). She would have loved this hub just as much as I have. So thank you Tony, for sharing this amazingly beautiful phoenix with us, for reminding us that even in the most horrific and painful circumstances, there is hope and beauty to be found, and on a personal note....thanks for facilitating a beautiful moment with a cherished memory...

Wonderful and amazing hub!


Storytellersrus profile image

Storytellersrus 5 years ago from Stepping past clutter

Thank you for the inclusion of all these bits of music. I will return to this hub again to hear more. The poetry and music touched me equally. I believe creativity is the only sane response to evil. Hugs, Barbara


lionel1 profile image

lionel1 5 years ago

Your hubs are just amazing; you bring things that I would never have looked at right in front of my face. Thank you for another incredible hub.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

LG - thanks so much for those kind words and I hope you do get to listen to the music sometime!

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Micky - indeed we have to work these things out in whatever ways we can! Evil must not prevail! Thanks so much for your always welcome visit!

Love and peace, my brotherman!

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

SimeyC - that is my belief too! Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Eiddwen - thanks so much for stopping by and leaving such kind words. Glad you liked the Hub.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Garnetbird - thanks so much for stopping by. I remember reading your Hub about Irena Sandler and subsequently researching her story. It's a great Hub. Will visit again.

Thanks again for the comment.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Ray - glad to here your creativity is burning again! Thanks for the visit and the very kind words.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Ingenira - thank you for those kind words. He was indeed one of a kind. And he did make a difference in his own unique way.

Thanks again for stopping by

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Tatjana - thanks so much for stopping by and for the wonderful comment. I'm glad you liked the music. I'm listening again to the Third right now!

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Rod - thanks so much for stopping by and especially for the very thoughtful comment.

I think for me the Holocaust stands as a powerful symbol of the dreadful things we do to each other in the name of nation, race, ideology or religion. We should never forget these things and use whatever peaceful means are to hand to stop them happening again. Art and in particular music I think can send powerful messages.

Thanks again

Love and peace

Tony


Rod Marsden profile image

Rod Marsden 5 years ago from Wollongong, NSW, Australia

tony, I guess I respond to art more than I do music. Call it a quirk. That's why I mentioned Maus.

Yes, the holocaust that happened in Europe and the one in Cambodia should never be forgotten.

The reasons for the holocaust in Europe are many.

I think things started to go wrong in 1919 in Versailles. I put together a hub about it.

When you are desperate to find meaning in life plus the old three square meals a day you can be more easily manipulated.

Given a choice between the Nazis and the Communists the industrialists of Germany chose to support the Nazis.

The fledgling democracy, the Weimer Republic, didn't stand a chance of holding on to power after signing the treaty. It took time but the Republic went the way of all things and the people of Germany gave up democracy for a dictatorship that promised to give the people back their self respect. Hitler wouldn't have stood a chance of getting into power and persecuting the Jews the way he did if not for the events of 1919. The French in particular wanted to punish the Germans for WW1. President Woodrow Wilson thought it a bad idea and laid down a better plan for continuous peace in Europe. He was pretty much ignored and in the end he was pressured back to Washington by an American people who had had enough of bloodshed and intrigue in Europe. And so you get WW2 and you get the death camps.


De Greek profile image

De Greek 5 years ago from UK

We humans can be extremely cruel and it has nothing to do with nationality or religion. It is not just the Holocaust. It may be the most known atrocity, but it is by no means unique. A father’s heart will be torn at the loss of his son irrespective of the father’s or the killer’s origins. If poetry was to stop because of atrocities, it had sufficient cause to do so centuries ago. Wonderful music…


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Ruby - thanks so much for stopping by with such a thoughtful comment. We should indeed never forget.

Thanks again

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Gerry - I so appreciate your comment! Your kind words uplift me and I am full of gratitude. So glad you found this a good experience.

Thanks again for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Kristen - I am really touched by your comment which means so much to me, truly. When I write I am always hoping that what I write will somehow mean something deep and personal to another person. It is that kind of connection which makes the effort of writing worthwhile to me, and so I am very grateful for your reading of my piece, and for your comment.

Thaks for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Barbara - while writing this I hoped you would be along to enjoy the music and the poetry! So glad you did. And I agree that the only repsonse to evil is to try to create something beautiful to counter it.

Thanks for stopping by.

Love, peace and hugs to you, dear friend.

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Lionel - thanks so much for those very kind words and I'm happy that you found this useful.

Thanks for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Rod - thanks for coming back with that interesting perspective. Your comments have added a great deal to this Hub and I thank you for that.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Dimitris - thanks for the perceptive comment. I agree - I think Adorno overreacted and overstated the position. Glad you enjoyed the music.

Love and peace

Tony


Sally's Trove profile image

Sally's Trove 5 years ago from Southeastern Pennsylvania

Hubs like this are the reason HubPages will exist in the future. You illuminated this composer through words, music, visuals, bringing life not only to the works but to the man, and thus touched this reader deeply. What a gift you gave.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Sally - thank you so much for that comment. I needed to hear that just now.

Thanks for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


toknowinfo profile image

toknowinfo 5 years ago

Thank you Tony for this amazing hub. Your hub is very important in that it helps us all remember the atrocities man will do against man. Yet you show that through art, music, and poetry, goodness can and does exist.


kimh039 profile image

kimh039 5 years ago

Oh, Tony, how moving! I will want to come back here again and again. I liked Paco Chile the best. Thanks so much for stirring up some dormant feelings that are more conveniently locked away, but better brought to the surface from time to time - as a reminder of what we humans are capable of if our emotions lie dormant too long! I am revived.


mysterylady 89 profile image

mysterylady 89 5 years ago from Florida

KBurns' comment said it better than I could. This is a beautifully written hub. I rated it up and awesome.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Toknowinfo - thanks for the kind words. I appreciate them very much.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Kim - thanks so much for sommenting and so kindly!

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Mysterylady - thank you so much. Your visit and words are much appreciated.

Love and peace

Tony


nifty@50 profile image

nifty@50 5 years ago

Very inspirational & thought provoking. To live one's life to the fullest with joy in your heart, is not dancing on the bones of dead, but is paying great homage to them. Exemplified by the Mexican people in "Dia de Los Muertos", or The "Day of The Dead" which is a celebration of dancing and singing in honor of the dead. Great hub tonymac04!


ralwus 5 years ago

That was a horrible time from our past that is still present. I hope it is never forgotten. One could ask; Well, since Ezra Pound became a facist and later lost his mind, shall we dance on his bones? I think the dead would want us to write poetry, sing, dance and live. Up and awesome Tony. Blessings, Charlie


kathryn1000 profile image

kathryn1000 5 years ago from London

Thank you Tony .I'm speechless.


Ninon 5 years ago

Its almost 6 in the morning and I must confess I only skimmed very drunkenly your writing but being drunk I still want to comment. Forgive me people, my intentions are good.

Poetry is a condesement of beauty but also thought whichout the dry academic explanation to back up its verity - its a hotwire to the heart.

Sadly poetry has been poorly hijacked for loose thoughts begiinning with teenage angst and then continuing with some emotive people who are deluded knowing it is a complex thought process - re:Celan, a man who lived his words and working of them to somehow chip away at something to immense for words.

Poetry - as is philospophy is the last bastion of our civilisation - we need them more than we know yet we treat them as suplerfluous and a whim devoid from this worlds practical things.

The Holocaust is sadly not the last atrocity, they go on today in many different ways, the press only cherry picks wars to highlight and our superior reasons for intervention.

if thats the only recording history we are doomed.

Hic

Sorry. rant over


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Nifty - thanks for the wonderful comment and the interesting info about the "Dia de Los Muertos". I was not aware of that and it adds a great perspective to what I was trying to say here. Thank you.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Charlie - I really appreciate your comment, thank you. And yes, I will not dance on anyone's bones, but I will dance!

Enjoy your "hiatus" and the novel - I look forward to reading it!

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Kathryn - thanks so much for stopping by and I hope you have recovered your speech!

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Ninon - thanks so much for your meaningful if slightly less than sober rant! I appreciate the meaning and intention.

Thanks for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


prasetio30 profile image

prasetio30 5 years ago from malang-indonesia

Wonderful. I really love reading this hub from word by word. Thanks for let me know about this. Very well written, my friend. God bless you!

Love and peace, prasetio


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Prasetio - thank you, my brother! Appreciate your stopping by and commenting very much, and the kind words.

Love and peace

Tony


kathryn1000 profile image

kathryn1000 5 years ago from London

It was so moving and sad that it is hard to speak.Also I like that music so much.I shall come back to it again and again.Thank for the work you did to bring this to our minds and attention.You make life wortth living for those overwhelmed by too much knowledge and not knowing what to do.

I'm so glad I found it/The best thing I've read for ages.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Kathryn - I truly appreciate your words so much, thank you.

Love and peace

Tony


kathryn1000 profile image

kathryn1000 5 years ago from London

Thank you,Tony


Granny's House profile image

Granny's House 5 years ago from Older and Hopefully Wiser Time

Tony, fantastic hub. Thank you for sharing the music. It was beautiful.

voted up


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Granny's House - thank you for the gracious words. Much appreciated.

Love and peace

Tony


kathryn1000 profile image

kathryn1000 5 years ago from London

I feel better knowing Tony is alive in South Africa writing,thinking,liistening to music.Thinking about the tough challenges and the suffering so helping others to do the same.Thanks,Tony.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Thank you, Kathryn! Those words mean very much to me indeed!

Love and peace

Tony


katiem2 profile image

katiem2 5 years ago from I'm outta here

Thank you for voicing this all to often forgotten tragedy. You've honored it well. Not dancing on the bones of the dead is a fitting message and reminder we can still learn from this. :) katie


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Katie - thanks for stopping by and commenting. I do appreciate it very much. Thanks for the kind words.

Love and peace

Tony

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